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Page 64

WE HAVE WITH US TONIGHT

course, the best place for your hands is at your sides. They look well there, and they are in position to gesture easily when the urge comes. But if your hands feel like a bunch of bananas hanging at your sides, your mind won't be free and easy. You are trying to make something happen in the other man's head and heart. If you can do that, it doesn't matter what you do with your hands.
"How shall I deliver my talk?" Speak sincerely, from the heart. You may make blunders, but you can hardly fail to make an impression. The most difficult problem I face in training men is to blast them out of their shells and inspire them to speak with genuine earnestness. That is probably the most important rule in delivery. Your audience must feel that you know what you are talking about, that you mean it and have an intense desire to tell about it.
"How can I tell whether I am being heard?" When Abraham Lincoln made the famous speech that he afterward said made him President, he posted a friend in the back row with instructions to signal if Lincoln couldn't be heard. Not a bad idea for you. Remember, your voice can't carry unless you have plenty of air in your lungs. So breathe deeply. Talk to the people at the back. Speak with energy. Open your mouth. You don't have to shout. Even a whisper, when made correctly, will carry to the back of a large theater.
"Shall I tell funny stories?" No! In the whole realm of speechmaking, humor is the most difficult thing to achieve. If you try to be funny-you may easily fail. And if you fail, you will only afflict your audience with pity and embarrassment.
"How long shall I talk?" Stop when people are eager to have you go on. Stop before they want you to. Lincoln made the most famous speech in the world at Gettysburg; and he did it with ten sentences and spoke less than five minutes. Unless you are very much better than you think you are, and unless your subject is extremely important, you had better not take more than twice as much time as Lincoln took.

Original Article-Copyright 1936. Rotary International, 35E. Wacker Drive, Chicago r, Ill. (The Rotarian, November, '36)
Condensed Version-Copyright 1936, The Reader's Digest Assn., Inc. (The Reader's Digest, November, '36)

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE course, what is best place for your hands is at your sides. They look well there, and they are in position to gesture easily when what is urge comes. But if your hands feel like a bunch of bananas hanging at your sides, your mind won't be free and easy. You are trying to make something happen in what is other man's head and heart. If you can do that, it doesn't matter what you do with your hands. "How shall I deliver my talk?" Speak sincerely, from what is heart. You may make blunders, but you can hardly fail to make an impression. what is most difficult problem I face in training men is to blast them out of their shells and inspire them to speak with genuine earnestness. That is probably what is most important rule in delivery. Your audience must feel that you know what you are talking about, that you mean it and have an intense desire to tell about it. "How can I tell whether I am being heard?" When Abraham Lincoln made what is famous speech that he afterward said made him President, he posted a friend in what is back row with instructions to signal if Lincoln couldn't be heard. Not a bad idea for you. Remember, your voice can't carry unless you have plenty of air in your lungs. So breathe deeply. Talk to what is people at what is back. Speak with energy. Open your mouth. You don't have to shout. Even a whisper, when made correctly, will carry to what is back of a large theater. "Shall I tell funny stories?" No! In what is whole realm of speechmaking, humor is what is most difficult thing to achieve. If you try to be funny-you may easily fail. And if you fail, you will only afflict your audience with pity and embarrassment. "How long shall I talk?" Stop when people are eager to have you go on. Stop before they want you to. Lincoln made what is most famous speech in what is world at Gettysburg; and he did it with ten sentences and spoke less than five minutes. Unless you are very much better than you think you are, and unless your subject is extremely important, you had better not take more than twice as much time as Lincoln took. Original Article-Copyright 1936. Rotary International, 35E. Wacker Drive, Chicago r, Ill. (The Rotarian, November, '36) Condensed Version-Copyright 1936, what is Reader's Digest Assn., Inc. (The Reader's Digest, November, '36) where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 64 where is p align="center" where is strong WE HAVE WITH US TONIGHT where is p course, what is best place for your hands is at your sides. They look well there, and they are in position to gesture easily when what is urge comes. But if your hands feel like a bunch of bananas hanging at your sides, your mind won't be free and easy. You are trying to make something happen in what is other man's head and heart. If you can do that, it doesn't matter what you do with your hands. "How shall I deliver my talk?" Speak sincerely, from what is heart. You may make blunders, but you can hardly fail to make an impression. what is most difficult problem I face in training men is to blast them out of their shells and inspire them to speak with genuine earnestness. That is probably what is most important rule in delivery. Your audience must feel that you know what you are talking about, that you mean it and have an intense desire to tell about it. "How can I tell whether I am being heard?" When Abraham Lincoln made what is famous speech that he afterward said made him President, he posted a friend in what is back row with instructions to signal if Lincoln couldn't be heard. Not a bad idea for you. Remember, your voice can't carry unless you have plenty of air in your lungs. So breathe deeply. Talk to what is people at what is back. Speak with energy. Open your mouth. You don't have to shout. Even a whisper, when made correctly, will carry to what is back of a large theater. "Shall I tell funny stories?" No! In what is whole realm of speechmaking, humor is what is most difficult thing to achieve. If you try to be funny-you may easily fail. And if you fail, you will only afflict your audience with pity and embarrassment. "How long shall I talk?" Stop when people are eager to have you go on. Stop before they want you to. Lincoln made what is most famous speech in what is world at Gettysburg; and he did it with ten sentences and spoke less than five minutes. Unless you are very much better than you think you are, and unless your subject is extremely important, you had better not take more than twice as much time as Lincoln took. Original Article-Copyright 1936. Rotary International, 35E. Wacker Drive, Chicago r, Ill. (The Rotarian, November, '36) Condensed Version-Copyright 1936, what is Reader's Digest Assn., Inc. (The Reader's Digest, November, '36) where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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