Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 63

WE HAVE WITH US TONIGHT

talk on the subject, "Is the public honest?" First, sit down and check up your own experiences. Then go to the merchants in your town who do credit business and ask them for their experiences. Ask your local dentists and doctors. If there is a Better Business Bureau in your town, interview the manager. Write the National Association of Credit Men asking where you can find material. Go to your public library. Spend an hour of preparation for every seven seconds you expect to talk. Get ten times as much material as you can use. You will then have an inner urge, a conviction-and your talk will almost make itself.
"Shall I memorize my talk?" No! Never! If you do, you are likely to forget; and the pangs of inflammatory rheumatism seem mild in comparison with the agonies endured by the speaker who suddenly forgets his "canned" speech. But even if you do remember your talk, the whole performance will lack life, color, intimacy.
But if you think out what you are going to say-think it out over and over again, make a few notes and then trust to Allah to give you the words you need-your performance will be human and natural. True, your talk may be crude in spots, but what you do say will get over far better than a memorized oration.
"What gestures shall I make?" As far as the audience is concerned, it won't be necessary to make any gestures. But gestures will help you to let yourself go. I use lots of gestures while speaking, especially when I am talking on the radio. I need them to help me warm up before the unresponsive mike. In the same way, you can force yourself to speak with enthusiasm before an audience by merely forcing yourself to make any sort of emphatic gestures. But don't plan them in advance. Remember you are trying to instruct, entertain or move an audience to action. A speech is a psychological process, not a physical exhibition of grace; and you should no more be thinking of gestures than of words. You ought to be thinking only of your ideas, your message and your audience.
"Shall I put my bands in my pockets?" Theodore Roosevelt did, and so did William Jennings Bryan and Chauncey M. Depew. Of

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE talk on what is subject, "Is what is public honest?" First, sit down and check up your own experiences. Then go to what is merchants in your town who do credit business and ask them for their experiences. Ask your local dentists and doctors. If there is a Better Business Bureau in your town, interview what is manager. Write what is National Association of Credit Men asking where you can find material. Go to your public library. Spend an hour of preparation for every seven seconds you expect to talk. Get ten times as much material as you can use. You will then have an inner urge, a conviction-and your talk will almost make itself. "Shall I memorize my talk?" No! Never! If you do, you are likely to forget; and what is pangs of inflammatory rheumatism seem mild in comparison with what is agonies endured by what is speaker who suddenly forgets his "canned" speech. But even if you do remember your talk, what is whole performance will lack life, color, intimacy. But if you think out what you are going to say-think it out over and over again, make a few notes and then trust to Allah to give you what is words you need-your performance will be human and natural. True, your talk may be crude in spots, but what you do say will get over far better than a memorized oration. "What gestures shall I make?" As far as what is audience is concerned, it won't be necessary to make any gestures. But gestures will help you to let yourself go. I use lots of gestures while speaking, especially when I am talking on what is radio. I need them to help me warm up before what is unresponsive mike. In what is same way, you can force yourself to speak with enthusiasm before an audience by merely forcing yourself to make any sort of emphatic gestures. But don't plan them in advance. Remember you are trying to instruct, entertain or move an audience to action. A speech is a psychological process, not a physical exhibition of grace; and you should no more be thinking of gestures than of words. You ought to be thinking only of your ideas, your message and your audience. "Shall I put my bands in my pockets?" Theodore Roosevelt did, and so did William Jennings Bryan and Chauncey M. Depew. Of where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is p where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 63 where is p align="center" where is strong WE HAVE WITH US TONIGHT where is p talk on what is subject, "Is what is public honest?" First, sit down and check up your own experiences. Then go to what is merchants in your town who do credit business and ask them for their experiences. Ask your local dentists and doctors. If there is a Better Business Bureau in your town, interview what is manager. Write what is National Association of Credit Men asking where you can find material. Go to your public library. Spend an hour of preparation for every seven seconds you expect to talk. Get ten times as much material as you can use. You will then have an inner urge, a conviction-and your talk will almost make itself. "Shall I memorize my talk?" No! Never! If you do, you are likely to forget; and what is pangs of inflammatory rheumatism seem mild in comparison with what is agonies endured by what is speaker who suddenly forgets his "canned" speech. But even if you do remember your talk, what is whole performance will lack life, color, intimacy. But if you think out what you are going to say-think it out over and over again, make a few notes and then trust to Allah to give you what is words you need-your performance will be human and natural. True, your talk may be crude in spots, but what you do say will get over far better than a memorized oration. "What gestures shall I make?" As far as what is audience is concerned, it won't be necessary to make any gestures. But gestures will help you to let yourself go. I use lots of gestures while speaking, especially when I am talking on what is radio. I need them to help me warm up before what is unresponsive mike. In what is same way, you can force yourself to speak with enthusiasm before an audience by merely forcing yourself to make any sort of emphatic gestures. But don't plan them in advance. Remember you are trying to instruct, entertain or move an audience to action. A speech is a psychological process, not a physical exhibition of grace; and you should no more be thinking of gestures than of words. You ought to be thinking only of your ideas, your message and your audience. "Shall I put my bands in my pockets?" Theodore Roosevelt did, and so did William Jennings Bryan and Chauncey M. Depew. Of where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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