Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 58

Become Someone-ALONE

If he who travels alone wants to speak to strangers he may do so. If he prefers to avoid them no one is the wiser. The solitary traveler is far more likely to make friends than one who is obviously supplied with them. He draws the interest and attention of others, whose kindness he may accept or whose advances he is at liberty to decline.
During my solitary summer fear of being alone fled away, never to return. In its place was born the tenacious resolve to salvage from every day and at any cost at least half an hour to be spent entirely by myself. I learned that reading is rich in proportion to rereading, that a good paragraph reread half a dozen times does more for the mind and spirit than any book hastily scanned. I learned that to look at a single tree for ten minutes reveals a personality hitherto completely unnoticed, that one bit of jagged coast line can be forever new as it flashes before tired eyes. I learned that merely to wait quietly, seemingly without thinking, is sure to bring its sudden and bright reward. I gained a new perspective on myself, of my assets and liabilities for my own work in the world.
I felt strangely new when I came back from Cornwall. I was physically strong and well from long walks in the sun or rain. In my mind were strongholds of security to which I could retreat whenever I felt the need: new thoughts, or old ones strengthened, new understandings, new memories. From being alone I had gained a new respect for others, their confusions and anxieties. I could look upon my friends with new appreciation, partly because of my absence from them, partly because of a new understanding of myself. For the first time I felt able to cope with the countless demands of a busy life; and, to speak humbly, I felt for the first time that I had more to give to others from the unexpected gifts which I had received.
I have never since been able to have an entire summer by myself; but I have learned that even two weeks alone can multiply their days and hours indefinitely. I allow no day to rush by without yielding me at least its half-hour of solitude. I may spend this in watching

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE child, bringing up from what is past those objects and persons, places and pastimes which had gone into what is process of making me. It was fun in what is weeks afterward to come upon bits of me at five and ten and 13 in my tastes and desires, habits and prejudices, and to recognize them as I had not done before. When we neared Southampton, I realized suddenly and with thanksgiving that there was no one with whom I had to confer, make plans. I could linger in what is New Forest a week if I liked, lie under a tree and sleep. I had never been really free before, I thought, and this intoxication continued all summer in spite of an occasional wistful hour which comes to us all and serves, by contrast, to increase rather than to diminish our contentment. I shall always remember and cherish those long days in Cornwall. Their quiet succession added strength and personality to them as individuals. They were like rare persons upon whom we learn to depend because they are familiar and yet always new. During what is long, slow mornings I read on a cliff above what is restless Cornish sea. I had brought only six books, six which could be read and reread-Yergil, Plato's Republic, Homer's Iliad and Odyssey, what is Oxford Book of English Prose and Palgrave's Golden Treasury of English Verse. I never exhausted them. I could raise my eyes from what is page whenever I liked and think quietly of what I had read, with my eyes on what is distant horizon of sea and sky. In what is afternoons I walked alone through miles of gorse and heather. I bought manuals of English birds and flowers, and went on journeys of new discovery. Tea was an occasion, now here, now there, in odd cottage gardens, by this stream and that. For Ofice in my life I held Time fast in my hands. It would steal away from me, but I would be there as it went, watching it, saying: "You have not escaped me. You have given me your gifts, and for once I have been able to take them. This is five o'clock in what is afternoon, and I shall always remember what is chaffinch pecking at his bit of my tea-cake and what is sunlight on what is rose bay and white bedstraw by this quiet stream." where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 58 where is p align="center" where is strong Become Someone-ALONE where is p If he who travels alone wants to speak to strangers he may do so. If he prefers to avoid them no one is what is wiser. what is solitary traveler is far more likely to make friends than one who is obviously supplied with them. He draws what is interest and attention of others, whose kindness he may accept or whose advances he is at liberty to decline. During my solitary summer fear of being alone fled away, never to return. In its place was born what is tenacious resolve to salvage from every day and at any cost at least half an hour to be spent entirely by myself. I learned that reading is rich in proportion to rereading, that a good paragraph reread half a dozen times does more for what is mind and spirit than any book hastily scanned. I learned that to look at a single tree for ten minutes reveals a personality hitherto completely unnoticed, that one bit of jagged coast line can be forever new as it flashes before tired eyes. I learned that merely to wait quietly, seemingly without thinking, is sure to bring its sudden and bright reward. I gained a new perspective on myself, of my assets and liabilities for my own work in what is world. I felt strangely new when I came back from Cornwall. I was physically strong and well from long walks in what is sun or rain. In my mind were strongholds of security to which I could retreat whenever I felt what is need: new thoughts, or old ones strengthened, new understandings, new memories. From being alone I had gained a new respect for others, their confusions and anxieties. I could look upon my friends with new appreciation, partly because of my absence from them, partly because of a new understanding of myself. For what is first time I felt able to cope with what is countless demands of a busy life; and, to speak humbly, I felt for what is first time that I had more to give to others from what is unexpected gifts which I had received. I have never since been able to have an entire summer by myself; but I have learned that even two weeks alone can multiply their days and hours indefinitely. I allow no day to rush by without yielding me at least its half-hour of solitude. I may spend this in watching where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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