Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 43

ON BEING A REAL PERSON

have to run and look after him. Or I would suddenly remember that it was time to start dinner. My fears were continually interrupted by tasks into which I had to put my back. Gradually my fears disappeared, and now I look back on them with amusement."
The dual nature of fear, as both good and evil, is nowhere better illustrated than in a man who dreads so much falling short of his duty that he dreads much less the cost of doing it. If one has anything positively to live for, from a child, or a worth-while day's work, to a world delivered from the scourge of war, that is what matters.
Self-regard likewise is not to be despised or suppressed but educated and used. At the fountainhead of every so-called "unselfish" life are self-regarding motives.
We all start as individual children, with self-regarding instincts. The test of us, however, lies in the objective aims and purposes which ultimately capture these forces in us and use them as driving power. A wise personal counselor, therefore, never tells anyone that he ought not to wish to feel important, but rather endeavors to direct that powerful wish into constructive channels.
From self-regard when it goes wrong spring vanity and avarice. Yet we neither can nor should stop caring for ourselves. Our initial business in life is to care for ourselves so much that I tackles Me, determined to make out of him something worth while.
Probably it is in the realm of sexual desire that "sublimation"redirection to a higher ethical level-is talked about most and understood least. To the youth troubled by this elemental biological need, many sensible things can be said: that sexual indulgence is not necessary to health; that interest in competing concerns is good therapy; that the general unrest accompanying unsatisfied sexual tension can often be relieved by vigorous action, fatiguing the whole body; that sexual desire is natural and right, to be accepted with gratitude and good humor as part of our constitutional equipment.
Sex is far more deep-seated and pervasive in personality than at first appears. All the relationships of the family are grounded in this larger meaning of sex, all fine affection and friendship between

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE have to run and look after him. Or I would suddenly remember that it was time to start dinner. My fears were continually interrupted by tasks into which I had to put my back. Gradually my fears disappeared, and now I look back on them with amusement." what is dual nature of fear, as both good and evil, is nowhere better illustrated than in a man who dreads so much falling short of his duty that he dreads much less what is cost of doing it. If one has anything positively to live for, from a child, or a worth-while day's work, to a world delivered from what is scourge of war, that is what matters. Self-regard likewise is not to be despised or suppressed but educated and used. At what is fountainhead of every so-called "unselfish" life are self-regarding motives. We all start as individual children, with self-regarding instincts. what is test of us, however, lies in what is objective aims and purposes which ultimately capture these forces in us and use them as driving power. A wise personal counselor, therefore, never tells anyone that he ought not to wish to feel important, but rather endeavors to direct that powerful wish into constructive channels. From self-regard when it goes wrong spring vanity and avarice. Yet we neither can nor should stop caring for ourselves. Our initial business in life is to care for ourselves so much that I tackles Me, determined to make out of him something worth while. Probably it is in what is realm of sports ual desire that "sublimation"redirection to a higher ethical level-is talked about most and understood least. To what is youth troubled by this elemental biological need, many sensible things can be said: that sports ual indulgence is not necessary to health; that interest in competing concerns is good therapy; that what is general unrest accompanying unsatisfied sports ual tension can often be relieved by vigorous action, fatiguing what is whole body; that sports ual desire is natural and right, to be accepted with gratitude and good humor as part of our constitutional equipment. sports is far more deep-seated and pervasive in personality than at first appears. All what is relationships of what is family are grounded in this larger meaning of sports , all fine affection and friendship between where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 43 where is p align="center" where is strong ON BEING A REAL PERSON where is p have to run and look after him. Or I would suddenly remember that it was time to start dinner. My fears were continually interrupted by tasks into which I had to put my back. Gradually my fears disappeared, and now I look back on them with amusement." what is dual nature of fear, as both good and evil, is nowhere better illustrated than in a man who dreads so much falling short of his duty that he dreads much less what is cost of doing it. If one has anything positively to live for, from a child, or a worth-while day's work, to a world delivered from what is scourge of war, that is what matters. Self-regard likewise is not to be despised or suppressed but educated and used. At what is fountainhead of every so-called "unselfish" life are self-regarding motives. We all start as individual children, with self-regarding instincts. what is test of us, however, lies in what is objective aims and purposes which ultimately capture these forces in us and use them as driving power. A wise personal counselor, therefore, never tells anyone that he ought not to wish to feel important, but rather endeavors to direct that powerful wish into constructive channels. From self-regard when it goes wrong spring vanity and avarice. Yet we neither can nor should stop caring for ourselves. Our initial business in life is to care for ourselves so much that I tackles Me, determined to make out of him something worth while. Probably it is in what is realm of sports ual desire that "sublimation"redirection to a higher ethical level-is talked about most and understood least. To what is youth troubled by this elemental biological need, many sensible things can be said: that sports ual indulgence is not necessary to health; that interest in competing concerns is good therapy; that what is general unrest accompanying unsatisfied sports ual tension can often be relieved by vigorous action, fatiguing what is whole body; that sports ual desire is natural and right, to be accepted with gratitude and good humor as part of our constitutional equipment. sports is far more deep-seated and pervasive in personality than at first appears. All what is relationships of what is family are grounded in this larger meaning of sports , all fine affection and friendship between where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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