Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 41

ON BEING A REAL PERSON

Using All There Is in Us
ONE WAY or another we must do something with all our emotional drives. Such emotional urges as curiosity, pugnacity, fearfulness, self-regard, sexual desire are an essential part of us; we can either be ignobly enslaved by them or master them for the enrichment of our personality.
No basic emotional factor in human nature is to be despised; each of them can be ennobled by its use.
Pugnacity is one of the most deeply rooted emotional drives in human nature, and combativeness is necessary to the continuance and advance of human life. The fighting spirit expresses itself in hard work, in bravely facing personal handicaps. If, however, we give this indispensable emotional drive gangway, the results are shattering. A chronic hatred or even a cherished grudge tears to pieces the one who harbors it. A strong feeling of resentment is just as likely to cause disease as is a germ. The worst thing one can do to oneself is to let resentment dig in and hatred become chronic.
When Edward Everett Hale in his later years said, "I once had a determined enemy, and I have been trying all day to remember his name," he gave evidence not only of right-mindedness but of healthy-mindedness. So, too, Lincoln, rebuked for an expression of magnanimity toward the South during the Civil War, and told bitterly that he should desire rather to destroy his enemies, was not only morally but emotionally sound when he answered, "Do I not destroy them when I make them my friends?"
Fear is another indispensable element in the human make-up. Even in its simpler forms we cannot dispense with it; on the streets of a modern city a fearless man, if the phrase be taken literally, would probably be dead before nightfall. And fear can be a powerfully creative motive. In a profound sense industry springs from fear of penury, medical science from fear of disease. But fear's abnormalities-hysteria, phobia, obsessive anxiety-tear personality to pieces.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Usin,g All T]iere Is in Us ONE WAY or another we must do something with all our emotional drives. Such emotional urges as curiosity, pugnacity, fearfulness, self-regard, sports ual desire are an essential part of us; we can either be ignobly enslaved by them or master them for what is enrichment of our personality. No basic emotional factor in human nature is to be despised; each of them can be ennobled by its use. Pugnacity is one of what is most deeply rooted emotional drives in human nature, and combativeness is necessary to what is continuance and advance of human life. what is fighting spirit expresses itself in hard work, in bravely facing personal handicaps. If, however, we give this indispensable emotional drive gangway, what is results are shattering. A chronic hatred or even a cherished grudge tears to pieces what is one who harbors it. A strong feeling of resentment is just as likely to cause disease as is a germ. what is worst thing one can do to oneself is to let resentment dig in and hatred become chronic. When Edward Everett Hale in his later years said, "I once had a determined enemy, and I have been trying all day to remember his name," he gave evidence not only of right-mindedness but of healthy-mindedness. So, too, Lincoln, rebuked for an expression of magnanimity toward what is South during what is Civil War, and told bitterly that he should desire rather to destroy his enemies, was not only morally but emotionally sound when he answered, "Do I not destroy them when I make them my friends?" Fear is another indispensable element in what is human make-up. Even in its simpler forms we cannot dispense with it; on what is streets of a modern city a fearless man, if what is phrase be taken literally, would probably be dead before nightfall. And fear can be a powerfully creative motive. In a profound sense industry springs from fear of penury, medical science from fear of disease. But fear's abnormalities-hysteria, phobia, obsessive anxiety-tear personality to pieces. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 41 where is p align="center" where is strong ON BEING A REAL PERSON where is p Using All There Is in Us ONE WAY or another we must do something with all our emotional drives. Such emotional urges as curiosity, pugnacity, fearfulness, self-regard, sports ual desire are an essential part of us; we can either be ignobly enslaved by them or master them for what is enrichment of our personality. No basic emotional factor in human nature is to be despised; each of them can be ennobled by its use. Pugnacity is one of what is most deeply rooted emotional drives in human nature, and combativeness is necessary to what is continuance and advance of human life. what is fighting spirit expresses itself in hard work, in bravely facing personal handicaps. If, however, we give this indispensable emotional drive gangway, what is results are shattering. A chronic hatred or even a cherished grudge tears to pieces what is one who harbors it. A strong feeling of resentment is just as likely to cause disease as is a germ. what is worst thing one can do to oneself is to let resentment dig in and hatred become chronic. When Edward Everett Hale in his later years said, "I once had a determined enemy, and I have been trying all day to remember his name," he gave evidence not only of right-mindedness but of healthy-mindedness. So, too, Lincoln, rebuked for an expression of magnanimity toward what is South during what is Civil War, and told bitterly that he should desire rather to destroy his enemies, was not only morally but emotionally sound when he answered, "Do I not destroy them when I make them my friends?" Fear is another indispensable element in what is human make-up. Even in its simpler forms we cannot dispense with it; on what is streets of a modern city a fearless man, if what is phrase be taken literally, would probably be dead before nightfall. And fear can be a powerfully creative motive. In a profound sense industry springs from fear of penury, medical science from fear of disease. But fear's abnormalities-hysteria, phobia, obsessive anxiety-tear personality to pieces. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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