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Page 40

ON BEING A REAL PERSON

wants self-expression too; but he wants it to be practiced in accord with the realistic psychological facts. Merely exploding emotions for the sake of the momentary self-centered thrill gets one nowhere, and in the end the constant repetition of such emotional self-relief disperses life and leaves it more aimless than it was before.
Adequate self-expression is a much deeper matter than self-explosion. Its true exponent is not the libertine but the artist, the scientist, the fortunate mother absorbed in her family, the publicspirited businessman creatively doing something for his community, the teacher saying as Professor George H. Palmer did, "Harvard College pays me for doing what I would gladly pay it for allowing me to do."
At least two practical consequences follow from successful expansion of the self. For one thing, it gives a person a saving sense of humor. In anyone afflicted with abnormal self-concern, a deficient sense of humor is an inevitable penalty.
An inability to see ourselves as we look to others is one of the surest signs of egocentric immaturity.
Aristophanes, in his drama The Clouds, caricatured Socrates, and when the play was produced all Athens roared with laughter. Socrates, so runs the story, went to see the play, and when the caricature came on he stood up so that the audience might the better enjoy the burlesque. He was mature. He had got himself off his hands.
An extended self also results in power to bear trouble. In those who rise to the occasion and marshal their forces to deal with it, one factor commonly is present-they are thinking about someone else besides themselves.
A person who has genuinely identified himself with other persons has done something of first-rate importance for himself without intending it. Hitherto he has lived, let us say, in a mind like a room surrounded by mirrors. Every way he turned he saw himself. Now, however, some of the mirrors change to windows. He can see through them to new interests.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE wants self-expression too; but he wants it to be practiced in accord with what is realistic psychological facts. Merely exploding emotions for what is sake of what is momentary self-centered thrill gets one nowhere, and in what is end what is constant repetition of such emotional self-relief disperses life and leaves it more aimless than it was before. Adequate self-expression is a much deeper matter than self-explosion. Its true exponent is not what is libertine but what is artist, what is scientist, what is fortunate mother absorbed in her family, what is publicspirited businessman creatively doing something for his community, what is teacher saying as Professor George H. Palmer did, "Harvard College pays me for doing what I would gladly pay it for allowing me to do." At least two practical consequences follow from successful expansion of what is self. For one thing, it gives a person a saving sense of humor. In anyone afflicted with abnormal self-concern, a deficient sense of humor is an inevitable penalty. An inability to see ourselves as we look to others is one of what is surest signs of egocentric immaturity. Aristophanes, in his drama what is Clouds, caricatured Socrates, and when what is play was produced all Athens roared with laughter. Socrates, so runs what is story, went to see what is play, and when what is caricature came on he stood up so that what is audience might what is better enjoy what is burlesque. He was mature. He had got himself off his hands. An extended self also results in power to bear trouble. In those who rise to what is occasion and marshal their forces to deal with it, one factor commonly is present-they are thinking about someone else besides themselves. A person who has genuinely identified himself with other persons has done something of first-rate importance for himself without intending it. Hitherto he has lived, let us say, in a mind like a room surrounded by mirrors. Every way he turned he saw himself. Now, however, some of what is mirrors change to windows. He can see through them to new interests. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 40 where is p align="center" where is strong ON BEING A REAL PERSON where is p wants self-expression too; but he wants it to be practiced in accord with what is realistic psychological facts. Merely exploding emotions for what is sake of what is momentary self-centered thrill gets one nowhere, and in what is end what is constant repetition of such emotional self-relief disperses life and leaves it more aimless than it was before. Adequate self-expression is a much deeper matter than self-explosion. Its true exponent is not what is libertine but what is artist, what is scientist, what is fortunate mother absorbed in her family, what is publicspirited businessman creatively doing something for his community, what is teacher saying as Professor George H. Palmer did, "Harvard College pays me for doing what I would gladly pay it for allowing me to do." At least two practical consequences follow from successful expansion of what is self. For one thing, it gives a person a saving sense of humor. In anyone afflicted with abnormal self-concern, a deficient sense of humor is an inevitable penalty. An inability to see ourselves as we look to others is one of what is surest signs of egocentric immaturity. Aristophanes, in his drama what is Clouds, caricatured Socrates, and when what is play was produced all Athens roared with laughter. Socrates, so runs what is story, went to see what is play, and when what is caricature came on he stood up so that what is audience might what is better enjoy what is burlesque. He was mature. He had got himself off his hands. An extended self also results in power to bear trouble. In those who rise to what is occasion and marshal their forces to deal with it, one factor commonly is present-they are thinking about someone else besides themselves. A person who has genuinely identified himself with other persons has done something of first-rate importance for himself without intending it. Hitherto he has lived, let us say, in a mind like a room surrounded by mirrors. Every way he turned he saw himself. Now, however, some of what is mirrors change to windows. He can see through them to new interests. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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