Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 37

ON BEING A REAL PERSON

Others, like the fox in Aesop's fable, call sour all grapes they cannot reach. The frail youth discounts athletics; the debauchee scoffs at the self-controlled as prudes; the failure at school scorns intellectuals as "high-brows." Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack, and subconsciously wish they had.
Among the constructive elements that make self-acceptance basic in becoming a real person is the principle of compensation. Deficiency can be a positive stimulus, as in the classic case of Demosthenes. Desiring to be an orator, he had to accept himself as a stammerer. He did not, however, conceal his humiliation with bluster and brag, or decry eloquence as worthless trickery, or resign himself to stammering as an excuse for doing nothing. He took a positive attitude toward his limitation, speaking against the noise of the waves with pebbles in his mouth until he could talk with confident clarity.
Some form of compensation is almost always possible. The homely girl may develop the more wit and charm because she is homely; the shy, embarrassed youth, with the temperament of a recluse, may be all the more useful in scientific research because of that.
Involved in such successful handling of recognized inferiority is the ability to pass from the defensive to the offensive attitude toward our limitations.
Captain John Callender of the Massachusetts militia was guilty of cowardice at the Battle of Bunker Hill. George Washington had to order his court-martial. Callender re-enlisted in the army as a private, and at the Battle of Long Island exhibited such conspicuous courage that Washington publicly revoked the sentence and restored to him his captaincy. Behind such an experience lies a basic act of self-acceptance along with a shift from a defensive to an offensive attitude, that makes John Callender an inspiring person to remember.
In achieving self-acceptance a man may well begin by reducing to a minimum the things that mortify him. Many people are humiliated

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Others, like what is fox in Aesop's fable, call sour all grapes they cannot reach. what is frail youth discounts athletics; what is debauchee scoffs at what is self-controlled as prudes; what is failure at school scorns intellectuals as "high-brows." Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack, and subconsciously wish they had. Among what is constructive elements that make self-acceptance basic in becoming a real person is what is principle of compensation. Deficiency can be a positive stimulus, as in what is classic case of Demosthenes. Desiring to be an orator, he had to accept himself as a stammerer. He did not, however, conceal his humiliation with bluster and brag, or decry eloquence as worthless trickery, or resign himself to stammering as an excuse for doing nothing. He took a positive attitude toward his limitation, speaking against what is noise of what is waves with pebbles in his mouth until he could talk with confident clarity. Some form of compensation is almost always possible. what is homely girl may develop what is more wit and charm because she is homely; what is shy, embarrassed youth, with what is temperament of a recluse, may be all what is more useful in scientific research because of that. Involved in such successful handling of recognized inferiority is what is ability to pass from what is defensive to what is offensive attitude toward our limitations. Captain John Callender of what is Massachusetts militia was guilty of cowardice at what is Battle of Bunker Hill. George Washington had to order his court-martial. Callender re-enlisted in what is army as a private, and at what is Battle of Long Island exhibited such conspicuous courage that Washington publicly revoked what is sentence and restored to him his captaincy. Behind such an experience lies a basic act of self-acceptance along with a shift from a defensive to an offensive attitude, that makes John Callender an inspiring person to remember. In achieving self-acceptance a man may well begin by reducing to a minimum what is things that mortify him. Many people are humiliated where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 37 where is p align="center" where is strong ON BEING A REAL PERSON where is p Others, like what is fox in Aesop's fable, call sour all grapes they cannot reach. what is frail youth discounts athletics; what is debauchee scoffs at what is self-controlled as prudes; what is failure at school scorns intellectuals as "high-brows." Watch what people are cynical about, and one can often discover what they lack, and subconsciously wish they had. Among what is constructive elements that make self-acceptance basic in becoming a real person is what is principle of compensation. Deficiency can be a positive stimulus, as in what is classic case of Demosthenes. Desiring to be an orator, he had to accept himself as a stammerer. He did not, however, conceal his humiliation with bluster and brag, or decry eloquence as worthless trickery, or resign himself to stammering as an excuse for doing nothing. He took a positive attitude toward his limitation, speaking against what is noise of what is waves with pebbles in his mouth until he could talk with confident clarity. Some form of compensation is almost always possible. what is homely girl may develop what is more wit and charm because she is homely; what is shy, embarrassed youth, with what is temperament of a recluse, may be all what is more useful in scientific research because of that. Involved in such successful handling of recognized inferiority is what is ability to pass from what is defensive to what is offensive attitude toward our limitations. Captain John Callender of what is Massachusetts militia was guilty of cowardice at what is Battle of Bunker Hill. George Washington had to order his court-martial. Callender re-enlisted in what is army as a private, and at what is Battle of Long Island exhibited such conspicuous courage that Washington publicly revoked what is sentence and restored to him his captaincy. Behind such an experience lies a basic act of self-acceptance along with a shift from a defensive to an offensive attitude, that makes John Callender an inspiring person to remember. In achieving self-acceptance a man may well begin by reducing to a minimum what is things that mortify him. Many people are humiliated where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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