Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 35

ON BEING A REAL PERSON

life is possible, therefore, without an initial act of selfacceptance, as though to say: I, John Smith, hereby accept myself, with my inherited endowments and handicaps and with the elements in my environment that I cannot control, and I will now see what I can do with this John Smith.
Alec Templeton entertains millions over the radio with his music and amuses them with his whimsicalities. He is stone blind. The human story has nothing nobler to present than handicapped men and women who, accepting themselves, have illustrated what Dr. Alfred Adler called "the human being's power to turn a minus into a plus."
Tension between our existent and our desired selves often arises from high moral ideals, and nowhere is it more likely to be mishandled. Unselfishness and loyalty, for instance, are major virtues, but a daughter under the thralldom of a possessive mother can so picture herself as in duty bound to be unselfish and loyal that, without doing her mother any real good, her life is blighted and her personality wrecked.
When self-acceptance is not achieved and the strain between the actual and the dreamed-of self becomes tense, the result is an unhappy and sometimes crushing sense of inferiority. A study of 275 college men and women revealed that over go percent suffered from gnawing, frustrated feelings of deficiency. They gave all sorts of reasons-physical incompetence, unpleasant appearance, lack of social charm, failure in love, low-grade intellectual ability.
The problem is often handled in unhealthy ways. Some deal with it by the smoke-screen method. Feeling miserably inferior, and not wanting others to know it, the shy become aggressive, the embarrassed effusive, and the timid bluster and brag. One man, hitherto gentle and considerate in his family, suffered a humiliating failure. At once he began to grow harsh and domineering. Paradoxical though it is, when he felt superior he behaved humbly, as though he felt inferior; when he felt inferior he began to swagger as though he were superior.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE life is possible, therefore, without an initial act of selfacceptance, as though to say: I, John Smith, hereby accept myself, with my inherited endowments and handicaps and with what is elements in my environment that I cannot control, and I will now see what I can do with this John Smith. Alec Templeton entertains millions over what is radio with his music and amuses them with his whimsicalities. He is stone blind. what is human story has nothing nobler to present than handicapped men and women who, accepting themselves, have illustrated what Dr. Alfred Adler called "the human being's power to turn a minus into a plus." Tension between our existent and our desired selves often arises from high moral ideals, and nowhere is it more likely to be mishandled. Unselfishness and loyalty, for instance, are major virtues, but a daughter under what is thralldom of a possessive mother can so picture herself as in duty bound to be unselfish and loyal that, without doing her mother any real good, her life is blighted and her personality wrecked. When self-acceptance is not achieved and what is strain between what is actual and what is dreamed-of self becomes tense, what is result is an unhappy and sometimes crushing sense of inferiority. A study of 275 college men and women revealed that over go percent suffered from gnawing, frustrated feelings of deficiency. They gave all sorts of reasons-physical incompetence, unpleasant appearance, lack of social charm, failure in love, low-grade intellectual ability. what is problem is often handled in unhealthy ways. Some deal with it by what is smoke-screen method. Feeling miserably inferior, and not wanting others to know it, what is shy become aggressive, what is embarrassed effusive, and what is timid bluster and brag. One man, hitherto gentle and considerate in his family, suffered a humiliating failure. At once he began to grow harsh and domineering. Paradoxical though it is, when he felt superior he behaved humbly, as though he felt inferior; when he felt inferior he began to swagger as though he were superior. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 35 where is p align="center" where is strong ON BEING A REAL PERSON where is p life is possible, therefore, without an initial act of selfacceptance, as though to say: I, John Smith, hereby accept myself, with my inherited endowments and handicaps and with what is elements in my environment that I cannot control, and I will now see what I can do with this John Smith. Alec Templeton entertains millions over what is radio with his music and amuses them with his whimsicalities. He is stone blind. what is human story has nothing nobler to present than handicapped men and women who, accepting themselves, have illustrated what Dr. Alfred Adler called "the human being's power to turn a minus into a plus." Tension between our existent and our desired selves often arises from high moral ideals, and nowhere is it more likely to be mishandled. Unselfishness and loyalty, for instance, are major virtues, but a daughter under what is thralldom of a possessive mother can so picture herself as in duty bound to be unselfish and loyal that, without doing her mother any real good, her life is blighted and her personality wrecked. When self-acceptance is not achieved and what is strain between what is actual and what is dreamed-of self becomes tense, what is result is an unhappy and sometimes crushing sense of inferiority. A study of 275 college men and women revealed that over go percent suffered from gnawing, frustrated feelings of deficiency. They gave all sorts of reasons-physical incompetence, unpleasant appearance, lack of social charm, failure in love, low-grade intellectual ability. what is problem is often handled in unhealthy ways. Some deal with it by what is smoke-screen method. Feeling miserably inferior, and not wanting others to know it, what is shy become aggressive, what is embarrassed effusive, and what is timid bluster and brag. One man, hitherto gentle and considerate in his family, suffered a humiliating failure. At once he began to grow harsh and domineering. Paradoxical though it is, when he felt superior he behaved humbly, as though he felt inferior; when he felt inferior he began to swagger as though he were superior. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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