Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 35

ON BEING A REAL PERSON

courtesy. How common is the person whose courtesy is unreliable! We all know him-polite today, morose and uncivil tomorrow; obliging and well bred in business, crabbed and sulky at home; affable with one's so-called "equals," gruff and snobbish with one's servants.
In a man with character, the responses to life are, in their quality, established and well organized; one can count on them. He has become a whole person, with a unifying pattern of thought and feeling that gives coherence to everything he does.
A"well-integrated" life does not mean a placid life, with all conflicts resolved. Many great souls have been inwardly tortured. Dwight L. Moody said, "I've had more trouble with D. L. Moody than with any other man I know."
In all strong characters, when one listens behind the scenes, one hears echoes of strife and contention. Nevertheless, far from being at loose ends within themselves, such persons have organized their lives around some supreme values and achieved a powerful concentration of purpose.
The process by which real personality is thus attained is inward and spiritual. No environmental changes by themselves can so push a personality together as to bring this satisfying wholeness within. Even so fortunate an environment as a loyal and loving family cannot dispense a man from confronting himself. Novalis said: "Only so far as a man is happily married to himself is he fit for married life."
As for material prosperity, that often disorganizes life rather than unifies it. Indeed, nervous prostration is a specialty of the prosperous. Wealth, by increasing the number of possible choices, is often far more disrupting than satisfying.
Every human being sometime faces a situation where on the one side is his actual self, with his abilities and circumstances, and on the other are ideal pictures of himself and his achievements.
To hold high ideals and ambitions is man's glory, but this faculty can function so abnormally that it tears life to pieces. No well-intergraded

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE courtesy. How common is what is person whose courtesy is unreliable! We all know him-polite today, morose and uncivil tomorrow; obliging and well bred in business, crabbed and sulky at home; affable with one's so-called "equals," gruff and snobbish with one's servants. In a man with character, what is responses to life are, in their quality, established and well organized; one can count on them. He has become a whole person, with a unifying pattern of thought and feeling that gives coherence to everything he does. A"well-integrated" life does not mean a placid life, with all conflicts resolved. Many great souls have been inwardly tortured. Dwight L. Moody said, "I've had more trouble with D. L. Moody than with any other man I know." In all strong characters, when one listens behind what is scenes, one hears echoes of strife and contention. Nevertheless, far from being at loose ends within themselves, such persons have organized their lives around some supreme values and achieved a powerful concentration of purpose. what is process by which real personality is thus attained is inward and spiritual. No environmental changes by themselves can so push a personality together as to bring this satisfying wholeness within. Even so fortunate an environment as a loyal and loving family cannot dispense a man from confronting himself. Novalis said: "Only so far as a man is happily married to himself is he fit for married life." As for material prosperity, that often disorganizes life rather than unifies it. Indeed, nervous prostration is a specialty of what is prosperous. Wealth, by increasing what is number of possible choices, is often far more disrupting than satisfying. Every human being sometime faces a situation where on what is one side is his actual self, with his abilities and circumstances, and on what is other are ideal pictures of himself and his achievements. To hold high ideals and ambitions is man's glory, but this faculty can function so abnormally that it tears life to pieces. No well-intergraded where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 35 where is p align="center" where is strong ON BEING A REAL PERSON where is p courtesy. How common is what is person whose courtesy is unreliable! We all know him-polite today, morose and uncivil tomorrow; obliging and well bred in business, crabbed and sulky at home; affable with one's so-called "equals," gruff and snobbish with one's servants. In a man with character, what is responses to life are, in their quality, established and well organized; one can count on them. He has become a whole person, with a unifying pattern of thought and feeling that gives coherence to everything he does. A"well-integrated" life does not mean a placid life, with all conflicts resolved. Many great souls have been inwardly tortured. Dwight L. Moody said, "I've had more trouble with D. L. Moody than with any other man I know." In all strong characters, when one listens behind what is scenes, one hears echoes of strife and contention. Nevertheless, far from being at loose ends within themselves, such persons have organized their lives around some supreme values and achieved a powerful concentration of purpose. what is process by which real personality is thus attained is inward and spiritual. No environmental changes by themselves can so push a personality together as to bring this satisfying wholeness within. Even so fortunate an environment as a loyal and loving family cannot dispense a man from confronting himself. Novalis said: "Only so far as a man is happily married to himself is he fit for married life." As for material prosperity, that often disorganizes life rather than unifies it. Indeed, nervous prostration is a specialty of what is prosperous. Wealth, by increasing what is number of possible choices, is often far more disrupting than satisfying. Every human being sometime faces a situation where on what is one side is his actual self, with his abilities and circumstances, and on what is other are ideal pictures of himself and his achievements. To hold high ideals and ambitions is man's glory, but this faculty can function so abnormally that it tears life to pieces. No well-intergraded where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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