Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 33

ON BEING A REAL PERSON

crippled in boyhood in a schoolhouse fire. The doctors said that on1y a miracle could enable him to walk again. He began walking by following a plow across the fields, leaning on it for support; and then went on to tireless experimentation to see what he could do with his legs, until he broke all records for the mile run.
Pilgrim's Progress came from a prison, as did Don Quixote, Sir Walter Raleigh's History of the World and some of the best of O. Henry's stories.
Bad luck is a poor alibi if only because good luck by itself never yet guaranteed real personality.
On its highest level man's desire to escape responsibility expresses itself in ascribing all personal qualities to heredity and environment. This is a popular theory today. From intelligence quotients within to crippling environments without, it offers defenses for every kind of deficiency, so that no botched life need look far to find an excuse.
But consider the individual of superior inheritance and favorable circumstance. Is an admirable personality forced upon him? Certainly it does not seem so.
Handling difficulty, making the best of bad messes, is one of life's major businesses. Very often the reason victory is not won lies inside the individual. The recognition of this fact, however, by the individual concerned is difficult. At times we all resemble the man who was laboriously driving his horses on a dusty road. "How much longer does this hill last?" he asked a man by the roadside. "Hill!" was the answer. "Hill nothing! Your hind wheels are off!"
The world is a coarse-grained place, and other people are often unfair, selfish, cruel. Yet, after all, we know the difference between a man who always has an alibi and the man who in just as distressing a situation habitually looks inward to his own attitudes and resources -no excuses, no passing of the buck. In any circumstance he regards himself as his major problem, certain that if he handles himself well that is bound to make some difference.
A forthright, healthy-minded youth wrote home to his father after an unsuccessful football game, "Our opponents found a big hole

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE crippled in boyhood in a schoolhouse fire. what is doctors said that on1y a miracle could enable him to walk again. He began walking by following a plow across what is fields, leaning on it for support; and then went on to tireless experimentation to see what he could do with his legs, until he broke all records for what is mile run. Pilgrim's Progress came from a prison, as did Don Quixote, Sir Walter Raleigh's History of what is World and some of what is best of O. Henry's stories. Bad luck is a poor alibi if only because good luck by itself never yet guaranteed real personality. On its highest level man's desire to escape responsibility expresses itself in ascribing all personal qualities to heredity and environment. This is a popular theory today. From intelligence quotients within to crippling environments without, it offers defenses for every kind of deficiency, so that no botched life need look far to find an excuse. But consider what is individual of superior inheritance and favorable circumstance. Is an admirable personality forced upon him? Certainly it does not seem so. Handling difficulty, making what is best of bad messes, is one of life's major businesses. Very often what is reason victory is not won lies inside what is individual. what is recognition of this fact, however, by what is individual concerned is difficult. At times we all resemble what is man who was laboriously driving his horses on a dusty road. "How much longer does this hill last?" he asked a man by what is roadside. "Hill!" was what is answer. "Hill nothing! Your hind wheels are off!" what is world is a coarse-grained place, and other people are often unfair, selfish, cruel. Yet, after all, we know what is difference between a man who always has an alibi and what is man who in just as distressing a situation habitually looks inward to his own attitudes and resources -no excuses, no passing of what is buck. In any circumstance he regards himself as his major problem, certain that if he handles himself well that is bound to make some difference. A forthright, healthy-minded youth wrote home to his father after an unsuccessful football game, "Our opponents found a big hole where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="JUSTIFY" where is p align="left" Page 33 where is p align="center" where is strong ON BEING A REAL PERSON where is p crippled in boyhood in a schoolhouse fire. what is doctors said that on1y a miracle could enable him to walk again. He began walking by following a plow across what is fields, leaning on it for support; and then went on to tireless experimentation to see what he could do with his legs, until he broke all records for what is mile run. Pilgrim's Progress came from a prison, as did Don Quixote, Sir Walter Raleigh's History of what is World and some of what is best of O. Henry's stories. Bad luck is a poor alibi if only because good luck by itself never yet guaranteed real personality. On its highest level man's desire to escape responsibility expresses itself in ascribing all personal qualities to heredity and environment. This is a popular theory today. From intelligence quotients within to crippling environments without, it offers defenses for every kind of deficiency, so that no botched life need look far to find an excuse. But consider what is individual of superior inheritance and favorable circumstance. Is an admirable personality forced upon him? Certainly it does not seem so. Handling difficulty, making what is best of bad messes, is one of life's major businesses. Very often what is reason victory is not won lies inside what is individual. what is recognition of this fact, however, by what is individual concerned is difficult. At times we all resemble what is man who was laboriously driving his horses on a dusty road. "How much longer does this hill last?" he asked a man by what is roadside. "Hill!" was what is answer. "Hill nothing! Your hind wheels are off!" what is world is a coarse-grained place, and other people are often unfair, selfish, cruel. Yet, after all, we know what is difference between a man who always has an alibi and what is man who in just as distressing a situation habitually looks inward to his own attitudes and resources -no excuses, no passing of what is buck. In any circumstance he regards himself as his major problem, certain that if he handles himself well that is bound to make some difference. A forthright, healthy-minded youth wrote home to his father after an unsuccessful football game, "Our opponents found a big hole where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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