Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 20

My Child Was Crippled

Adaline was nearly ten before she could go to school. Until then I taught her at home. Because I knew that many interesting doors would always be closed to her, I was watchful to cultivate any special talents and interests she displayed. I saw to it that she had piano lessons, took her to children's concerts, bought her records of the simpler symphonies, and a child's book giving the stories of the operas. The only definite talent Adaline evidenced was in drawing. She did so well that I had trouble with her adult relatives. They decided she was a genius and began to point out the various geniuses who had maimed bodies!
I am extremely unsympathetic with such attitudes-I wanted Adaline to draw merely because she enjoyed it. If, later on, she could do something special with it, all right. But I wasn't going to permit her relatives to oblige her to be an artist. Relations grew pretty strained over this point just as, when Adaline came out with a high LQ. in some intelligence tests at school, I had difficulty in restraining two of her aunts from convincing her that, although she was lame, she had the best brain in our family.
It was not until late adolescence that Adaline's lameness appeared truly tragic to her. Of course this was the time Adaline should have started going out with boys-and didn't. There were several who liked well enough to come in and work algebra problems with Adaline or play cards with her. But taking her out--a date--was another question, and missing out on the complete social popularity any young girl desires was a bitter dose to her.
There was almost nothing I could do to soften this blow. Let her popular sister see to it that Adaline had dates? Often my older daughter, in perplexed distress, asked if she should do this. My answer was an emphatic negative. I knew that Adaline would see through any such plan and that it would hurt her pride.
There was only one thing I could do, and that was to try to prevent the sensitiveness Adaline was acquiring from coloring her mental outlook. A scholastic competition gave me my entering wedge. Her only formidable rival was a pretty girl who was one of

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Adaline was nearly ten before she could go to school. Until then I taught her at home. Because I knew that many interesting doors would always be closed to her, I was watchful to cultivate any special talents and interests she displayed. I saw to it that she had piano lessons, took her to children's concerts, bought her records of what is simpler symphonies, and a child's book giving what is stories of what is operas. what is only definite talent Adaline evidenced was in drawing. She did so well that I had trouble with her where is it relatives. They decided she was a genius and began to point out what is various geniuses who had maimed bodies! I am extremely unsympathetic with such attitudes-I wanted Adaline to draw merely because she enjoyed it. If, later on, she could do something special with it, all right. But I wasn't going to permit her relatives to oblige her to be an artist. Relations grew pretty strained over this point just as, when Adaline came out with a high LQ. in some intelligence tests at school, I had difficulty in restraining two of her aunts from convincing her that, although she was lame, she had what is best brain in our family. It was not until late adolescence that Adaline's lameness appeared truly tragic to her. Of course this was what is time Adaline should have started going out with boys-and didn't. There were several who liked well enough to come in and work algebra problems with Adaline or play cards with her. But taking her out--a date--was another question, and missing out on what is complete social popularity any young girl desires was a bitter dose to her. There was almost nothing I could do to soften this blow. Let her popular sister see to it that Adaline had dates? Often my older daughter, in perplexed distress, asked if she should do this. My answer was an emphatic negative. I knew that Adaline would see through any such plan and that it would hurt her pride. There was only one thing I could do, and that was to try to prevent what is sensitiveness Adaline was acquiring from coloring her mental outlook. A scholastic competition gave me my entering wedge. Her only formidable rival was a pretty girl who was one of where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 20 where is strong My Child Was Crippled where is p align="justify" Adaline was nearly ten before she could go to school. Until then I taught her at home. Because I knew that many interesting doors would always be closed to her, I was watchful to cultivate any special talents and interests she displayed. I saw to it that she had piano lessons, took her to children's concerts, bought her records of what is simpler symphonies, and a child's book giving what is stories of what is operas. what is only definite talent Adaline evidenced was in drawing. She did so well that I had trouble with her where is it relatives. They decided she was a genius and began to point out what is various geniuses who had maimed bodies! I am extremely unsympathetic with such attitudes-I wanted Adaline to draw merely because she enjoyed it. If, later on, she could do something special with it, all right. But I wasn't going to permit her relatives to oblige her to be an artist. Relations grew pretty strained over this point just as, when Adaline came out with a high LQ. in some intelligence tests at school, I had difficulty in restraining two of her aunts from convincing her that, although she was lame, she had what is best brain in our family. It was not until late adolescence that Adaline's lameness appeared truly tragic to her. Of course this was what is time Adaline should have started going out with boys-and didn't. There were several who liked well enough to come in and work algebra problems with Adaline or play cards with her. But taking her out--a date--was another question, and missing out on what is complete social popularity any young girl desires was a bitter dose to her. There was almost nothing I could do to soften this blow. Let her popular sister see to it that Adaline had dates? Often my older daughter, in perplexed distress, asked if she should do this. My answer was an emphatic negative. I knew that Adaline would see through any such plan and that it would hurt her pride. There was only one thing I could do, and that was to try to prevent what is sensitiveness Adaline was acquiring from coloring her mental outlook. A scholastic competition gave me my entering wedge. Her only formidable rival was a pretty girl who was one of where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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