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Page 19

My Child Was Crippled

as she often did, they asked, "Are you hurt?" And when she wasn't, things went on as before. I kept an ample supply of games Adaline could enjoy, but I had also a table tennis set, three pairs of roller skates, and all the usual paraphernalia for active children, and I never, never was guilty of saying, "Oh, now, don't play that; play something Adaline can enjoy too."
Knowing that she would sorely need both physical and mental courage, I carried on an unobtrusive campaign to release Adaline from fear. The first step was pets-kittens and dogs. When she was eight we bought a Shetland pony. Adaline didn't ride very well, of course, but her control over that docile beast gave her added selfconfidence. When she was 12 she was taught to swim. She's no wonderful swimmer, but she's capable of taking care of herself in water. And when she was 16 she learned to drive an automobile.
Often we harbor the erroneous impression that a lame child is essentially a saint. But a lame child has just as much talent for selfishness, conceit, untruthfulness, or any other unpleasant characteristic as a robust child. Adaline was no better and no worse than my other children, and I insisted upon exactly the same standards of behavior for her as for them.
For instance, in our home it has always been understood that each child puts away his playthings. Adaline loved dragging out every toy in the place and she hated clearing up after her play. Often I should have liked to put things away for her, because the actual work of putting them away required a lot more physical effort from her than from the others. I didn't succumb to this mistaken kindness. I believed that Adaline should have the same responsibility that the other children shouldered.
Here, again, relatives disapproved of my Spartan attitude. My mother said, "If she were my child, I'd give her anything she wants; there's time enough later on for her to suffer," In other words, let her grow up a spoiled hellion and, when she's an unbearable adult, she can find out to her sorrow that the world won't give her everything she wants just because she's lame.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE as she often did, they asked, "Are you hurt?" And when she wasn't, things went on as before. I kept an ample supply of games Adaline could enjoy, but I had also a table tennis set, three pairs of roller skates, and all what is usual paraphernalia for active children, and I never, never was guilty of saying, "Oh, now, don't play that; play something Adaline can enjoy too." Knowing that she would sorely need both physical and mental courage, I carried on an unobtrusive campaign to release Adaline from fear. what is first step was pets-kittens and dogs. When she was eight we bought a Shetland pony. Adaline didn't ride very well, of course, but her control over that docile beast gave her added selfconfidence. When she was 12 she was taught to swim. She's no wonderful swimmer, but she's capable of taking care of herself in water. And when she was 16 she learned to drive an automobile. Often we harbor what is erroneous impression that a lame child is essentially a saint. But a lame child has just as much talent for selfishness, conceit, untruthfulness, or any other unpleasant characteristic as a robust child. Adaline was no better and no worse than my other children, and I insisted upon exactly what is same standards of behavior for her as for them. For instance, in our home it has always been understood that each child puts away his playthings. Adaline loved dragging out every toy in what is place and she hated clearing up after her play. Often I should have liked to put things away for her, because what is actual work of putting them away required a lot more physical effort from her than from what is others. I didn't succumb to this mistaken kindness. I believed that Adaline should have what is same responsibility that what is other children shouldered. Here, again, relatives disapproved of my Spartan attitude. My mother said, "If she were my child, I'd give her anything she wants; there's time enough later on for her to suffer," In other words, let her grow up a spoiled hellion and, when she's an unbearable where is it , she can find out to her sorrow that what is world won't give her everything she wants just because she's lame. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 19 where is strong My Child Was Crippled where is p align="justify" as she often did, they asked, "Are you hurt?" And when she wasn't, things went on as before. I kept an ample supply of games Adaline could enjoy, but I had also a table tennis set, three pairs of roller skates, and all what is usual paraphernalia for active children, and I never, never was guilty of saying, "Oh, now, don't play that; play something Adaline can enjoy too." Knowing that she would sorely need both physical and mental courage, I carried on an unobtrusive campaign to release Adaline from fear. what is first step was pets-kittens and dogs. When she was eight we bought a Shetland pony. Adaline didn't ride very well, of course, but her control over that docile beast gave her added selfconfidence. When she was 12 she was taught to swim. She's no wonderful swimmer, but she's capable of taking care of herself in water. And when she was 16 she learned to drive an automobile. Often we harbor what is erroneous impression that a lame child is essentially a saint. But a lame child has just as much talent for selfishness, conceit, untruthfulness, or any other unpleasant characteristic as a robust child. Adaline was no better and no worse than my other children, and I insisted upon exactly what is same standards of behavior for her as for them. For instance, in our home it has always been understood that each child puts away his playthings. Adaline loved dragging out every toy in what is place and she hated clearing up after her play. Often I should have liked to put things away for her, because what is actual work of putting them away required a lot more physical effort from her than from what is others. I didn't succumb to this mistaken kindness. I believed that Adaline should have what is same responsibility that what is other children shouldered. Here, again, relatives disapproved of my Spartan attitude. My mother said, "If she were my child, I'd give her anything she wants; there's time enough later on for her to suffer," In other words, let her grow up a spoiled hellion and, when she's an unbearable where is it , she can find out to her sorrow that what is world won't give her everything she wants just because she's lame. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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