Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 16

You Won't Be Sutibbed

I, "my friend is riding for a fall." But I was wrong. What Jessup said to those fellows I never knew, but within five minutes he had engaged them in an earnest discussion of labor conditions throughout the country and their own chances of employment.
I've seen Jessup address women bred in the strictest code of convention, and wondered how he avoided being cut by them. He explained it in this way: "If in speaking to a woman you reveal that you are primarily interested in her personally or as a member of the opposite sex, she will instantly resent it, as she has every right to do. In effect, you are insulting her by the assumption that her attention may be so cheaply won. But speak to her as one human being to another, as one interested in the same scenery, the same music, or the same social problems, and she will extend her ready fellowship. Both men and women love to use their minds, and women especially regard it as a distinct compliment to be met on the intellectual plane common to both sexes."
Since knowing David Jessup, the stranger at my elbow has become the most interesting and approachable thing in life. And I know if I approach him unaffectedly there is no danger of being snubbed.
For ultimately we are not so different from one another. Training and tradition may have cast us in dissimilar molds, but the basic stuff of our humanity is pathetically the same. It is this realization that now makes every stranger accessible to me. He may be a barber or a banknote-engraver, but it is almost certain that he can tell me something that will heighten my mental stature or increase my spiritual gauge. I may like him or I may not; if he bores me, I can be off. But the thing that constantly surprises me is the scarcity of people who are really boresome or offensive. By far the larger part of our human race is composed of interesting and friendly members, all eager to know each other. And I have yet to see the person who did not become more attractive and more alive for laying aside his too prized reserve and mingling on equal terms with other members of our common, struggling, hungering human family.

Copyright 1935, The Reader's Digest Assn., Inc. (The Reader's Digest, December, '35)

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I, "my friend is riding for a fall." But I was wrong. What Jessup said to those fellows I never knew, but within five minutes he had engaged them in an earnest discussion of labor conditions throughout what is country and their own chances of employment. I've seen Jessup address women bred in what is strictest code of convention, and wondered how he avoided being cut by them. He explained it in this way: "If in speaking to a woman you reveal that you are primarily interested in her personally or as a member of what is opposite sports , she will instantly resent it, as she has every right to do. In effect, you are insulting her by what is assumption that her attention may be so cheaply won. But speak to her as one human being to another, as one interested in what is same scenery, what is same music, or what is same social problems, and she will extend her ready fellowship. Both men and women what time is it to use their minds, and women especially regard it as a distinct compliment to be met on what is intellectual plane common to both sports es." Since knowing David Jessup, what is stranger at my elbow has become what is most interesting and approachable thing in life. And I know if I approach him unaffectedly there is no danger of being snubbed. For ultimately we are not so different from one another. Training and tradition may have cast us in dissimilar molds, but what is basic stuff of our humanity is pathetically what is same. It is this realization that now makes every stranger accessible to me. He may be a barber or a banknote-engraver, but it is almost certain that he can tell me something that will heighten my mental stature or increase my spiritual gauge. I may like him or I may not; if he bores me, I can be off. But what is thing that constantly surprises me is what is scarcity of people who are really boresome or offensive. By far what is larger part of our human race is composed of interesting and friendly members, all eager to know each other. And I have yet to see what is person who did not become more attractive and more alive for laying aside his too prized reserve and mingling on equal terms with other members of our common, struggling, hungering human family. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 16 where is strong You Won't Be Sutibbed where is p align="justify" I, "my friend is riding for a fall." But I was wrong. What Jessup said to those fellows I never knew, but within five minutes he had engaged them in an earnest discussion of labor conditions throughout what is country and their own chances of employment. I've seen Jessup address women bred in what is strictest code of convention, and wondered how he avoided being cut by them. He explained it in this way: "If in speaking to a woman you reveal that you are primarily interested in her personally or as a member of what is opposite sports , she will instantly resent it, as she has every right to do. In effect, you are insulting her by what is assumption that her attention may be so cheaply won. But speak to her as one human being to another, as one interested in what is same scenery, what is same music, or what is same social problems, and she will extend her ready fellowship. Both men and women what time is it to use their minds, and women especially regard it as a distinct compliment to be met on what is intellectual plane common to both sports es." Since knowing David Jessup, what is stranger at my elbow has become what is most interesting and approachable thing in life. And I know if I approach him unaffectedly there is no danger of being snubbed. For ultimately we are not so different from one another. Training and tradition may have cast us in dissimilar molds, but what is basic stuff of our humanity is pathetically what is same. It is this realization that now makes every stranger accessible to me. He may be a barber or a banknote-engraver, but it is almost certain that he can tell me something that will heighten my mental stature or increase my spiritual gauge. I may like him or I may not; if he bores me, I can be off. But what is thing that constantly surprises me is what is scarcity of people who are really boresome or offensive. By far what is larger part of our human race is composed of interesting and friendly members, all eager to know each other. And I have yet to see what is person who did not become more attractive and more alive for laying aside his too prized reserve and mingling on equal terms with other members of our common, struggling, hungering human family. Copyright 1935, what is Reader's Digest Assn., Inc. (The Reader's Digest, December, '35) where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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