Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 15

You Won't Be Sutibbed

Another time, on the shore of a beautiful lake in a state park, Jessup noticed a man making sketches. Skillfully engaging the man in conversation, Jessup discovered that he was a marine horticulturistwith a new idea called "pond-scaping." "On thelakes surrounding the ancient Aztec capital," said the sketcher, "were many floating islands covered with feathery trees and rare flowers. I believe that I have rediscovered how such islands can be constructed and kept in motion, and am now making some sketches to interest the park commission in my idea."
On the way home I remarked, "That was one of the most interesting things that ever happened to me. Both the man and his drawings were fascinating."
Jessup agreed, then added slyly: "And you would never have met him if you had waited for an introduction, would you?"
"Don't rub it in, please. I've always known that I was missing a great deal, but I never knew how to get people started."
"To talk to a stranger," advised Jessup, "begin with a remark that penetrates to the core of his interest. Usually it will be something that applies to his work. Inane general remarks or fussy little questions only irk the busy man. One must be genuinely interested in what the stranger is doing, make an intelligent comment, then wait for him to respond. And he will respond, for the simple reason that most human beings are overjoyed when another person shows interest in their work. Take that floating-garden chap: if we had seemed bored he wouldn't even have begun to talk, for no man likes to expose his treasures to the indifferent. But when he saw that we were really deriving pleasure from his conversation, he tried to reward our interest. Why should he do this? Simply because no one has ever yet discovered a keener happiness than giving pleasure to others."
I was always expecting Jessup to be snubbed, but the snub never came. Once a trio of noisy roughs boarded our bus and began to annoy the passengers with a display of downright coarseness. Dignified, serious, Jessup got up and went back to them. "Here," thought

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Another time, on what is shore of a beautiful lake in a state park, Jessup noticed a man making sketches. S what time is it fully engaging what is man in conversation, Jessup discovered that he was a marine horticulturistwith a new idea called "pond-scaping." "On thelakes surrounding what is ancient Aztec capital," said what is sketcher, "were many floating islands covered with feathery trees and rare flowers. I believe that I have rediscovered how such islands can be constructed and kept in motion, and am now making some sketches to interest what is park commission in my idea." On what is way home I remarked, "That was one of what is most interesting things that ever happened to me. Both what is man and his drawings were fascinating." Jessup agreed, then added slyly: "And you would never have met him if you had waited for an introduction, would you?" "Don't rub it in, please. I've always known that I was missing a great deal, but I never knew how to get people started." "To talk to a stranger," advised Jessup, "begin with a remark that penetrates to what is core of his interest. Usually it will be something that applies to his work. Inane general remarks or fussy little questions only irk what is busy man. One must be genuinely interested in what what is stranger is doing, make an intelligent comment, then wait for him to respond. And he will respond, for what is simple reason that most human beings are overjoyed when another person shows interest in their work. Take that floating-garden chap: if we had seemed bored he wouldn't even have begun to talk, for no man likes to expose his treasures to what is indifferent. But when he saw that we were really deriving pleasure from his conversation, he tried to reward our interest. Why should he do this? Simply because no one has ever yet discovered a keener happiness than giving pleasure to others." I was always expecting Jessup to be snubbed, but what is snub never came. Once a trio of noisy roughs boarded our bus and began to annoy what is passengers with a display of downright coarseness. Dignified, serious, Jessup got up and went back to them. "Here," thought where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 15 where is strong You Won't Be Sutibbed where is p align="justify" Another time, on what is shore of a beautiful lake in a state park, Jessup noticed a man making sketches. S what time is it fully engaging what is man in conversation, Jessup discovered that he was a marine horticulturistwith a new idea called "pond-scaping." "On thelakes surrounding what is ancient Aztec capital," said what is sketcher, "were many floating islands covered with feathery trees and rare flowers. I believe that I have rediscovered how such islands can be constructed and kept in motion, and am now making some sketches to interest what is park commission in my idea." On what is way home I remarked, "That was one of what is most interesting things that ever happened to me. Both what is man and his drawings were fascinating." Jessup agreed, then added slyly: "And you would never have met him if you had waited for an introduction, would you?" "Don't rub it in, please. I've always known that I was missing a great deal, but I never knew how to get people started." "To talk to a stranger," advised Jessup, "begin with a remark that penetrates to what is core of his interest. Usually it will be something that applies to his work. Inane general remarks or fussy little questions only irk what is busy man. One must be genuinely interested in what what is stranger is doing, make an intelligent comment, then wait for him to respond. And he will respond, for what is simple reason that most human beings are overjoyed when another person shows interest in their work. Take that floating-garden chap: if we had seemed bored he wouldn't even have begun to talk, for no man likes to expose his treasures to what is indifferent. But when he saw that we were really deriving pleasure from his conversation, he tried to reward our interest. Why should he do this? Simply because no one has ever yet discovered a keener happiness than giving pleasure to others." I was always expecting Jessup to be snubbed, but what is snub never came. Once a trio of noisy roughs boarded our bus and began to annoy what is passengers with a display of downright coarseness. Dignified, serious, Jessup got up and went back to them. "Here," thought where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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