Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


Page 14

You Won't Be Sutibbed

interest and special information. When we stopped an hour later we were friends. It was something of a miracle, and I asked Jessup pointblank how he did it.
"Your happy knack of speaking to strangers-how do you manage it? Personally, I'm limited to a small circle of friends, all of the same type. All my life I've wanted to mingle with strangers who could widen my interests and quicken my sense of being alive, yet I've always hung back, afraid of a rebuff. How does one overcome this fear of being snubbed?"
Jessup waved his hand inclusively at the throng around us. "My tear of being snubbed," he said, "completely disappears when I remember that the dearest friends I have were once strangers. If you approach your fellow man with honest sympathy and a desire to be humanly friendly, he is not likely to misread your motive. I have met men of the most formidable self-importance, and found them all responsive, eager to visit with me. Rarely have I encountered even the slightest hint of a snub. No, my friend, you mustn't let fear be the basis of your seclusion. The new, the unusual, is no more dangerous than the familiar, and it has the advantage of being decidedly more exciting."
Subsequent experiences with David Jessup proved how right he was. Wherever he went, he would enter into conversation with all manner of people, and was forever turning up strange new types and odd, stimulating information. On one of our trips together we passed a granite quarry in which a number of men were walking about on tiptoe, carrying red flags and acting like advance messengers of doom. Instead of hurrying past, Jessup spoke to one of the flagcarriers, and in a few moments the man was telling us a hair-curling story. It seems that many years ago engineers had drilled 50 holes in this quarry, packed the holes with dynamite, and wired them for a blast. But some of the wiring was defective, and only half of the dynamite exploded! For 20 years workmen could not be persuaded to go near the quarry; it was now being reopened by men who received double pay because of the attendant danger.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE interest and special information. When we stopped an hour later we were friends. It was something of a miracle, and I asked Jessup pointblank how he did it. "Your happy knack of speaking to strangers-how do you manage it? Personally, I'm limited to a small circle of friends, all of what is same type. All my life I've wanted to mingle with strangers who could widen my interests and quicken my sense of being alive, yet I've always hung back, afraid of a rebuff. How does one overcome this fear of being snubbed?" Jessup waved his hand inclusively at what is throng around us. "My tear of being snubbed," he said, "completely disappears when I remember that what is dearest friends I have were once strangers. If you approach your fellow man with honest sympathy and a desire to be humanly friendly, he is not likely to misread your motive. I have met men of what is most formidable self-importance, and found them all responsive, eager to what is with me. Rarely have I encountered even what is slightest hint of a snub. No, my friend, you mustn't let fear be what is basis of your seclusion. what is new, what is unusual, is no more dangerous than what is familiar, and it has what is advantage of being decidedly more exciting." Subsequent experiences with David Jessup proved how right he was. Wherever he went, he would enter into conversation with all manner of people, and was forever turning up strange new types and odd, stimulating information. On one of our trips together we passed a granite quarry in which a number of men were walking about on tiptoe, carrying red flags and acting like advance messengers of doom. Instead of hurrying past, Jessup spoke to one of what is flagcarriers, and in a few moments what is man was telling us a hair-curling story. It seems that many years ago engineers had drilled 50 holes in this quarry, packed what is holes with dynamite, and wired them for a blast. But some of what is wiring was defective, and only half of what is dynamite exploded! For 20 years workmen could not be persuaded to go near what is quarry; it was now being reopened by men who received double pay because of what is attendant danger. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 14 where is strong You Won't Be Sutibbed where is p align="justify" interest and special information. When we stopped an hour later we were friends. It was something of a miracle, and I asked Jessup pointblank how he did it. "Your happy knack of speaking to strangers-how do you manage it? Personally, I'm limited to a small circle of friends, all of what is same type. All my life I've wanted to mingle with strangers who could widen my interests and quicken my sense of being alive, yet I've always hung back, afraid of a rebuff. How does one overcome this fear of being snubbed?" Jessup waved his hand inclusively at what is throng around us. "My tear of being snubbed," he said, "completely disappears when I remember that what is dearest friends I have were once strangers. If you approach your fellow man with honest sympathy and a desire to be humanly friendly, he is not likely to misread your motive. I have met men of what is most formidable self-importance, and found them all responsive, eager to what is with me. Rarely have I encountered even what is slightest hint of a snub. No, my friend, you mustn't let fear be what is basis of your seclusion. what is new, what is unusual, is no more dangerous than what is familiar, and it has what is advantage of being decidedly more exciting." Subsequent experiences with David Jessup proved how right he was. Wherever he went, he would enter into conversation with all manner of people, and was forever turning up strange new types and odd, stimulating information. On one of our trips together we passed a granite quarry in which a number of men were walking about on tiptoe, carrying red flags and acting like advance messengers of doom. Instead of hurrying past, Jessup spoke to one of what is flagcarriers, and in a few moments what is man was telling us a hair-curling story. It seems that many years ago engineers had drilled 50 holes in this quarry, packed what is holes with dynamite, and wired them for a blast. But some of what is wiring was defective, and only half of what is dynamite exploded! For 20 years workmen could not be persuaded to go near what is quarry; it was now being reopened by men who received double pay because of what is attendant danger. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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