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Page 12

Don't Be a "DUCK"

interest to art galleries. Dig out a few artists and you will unearth the most interesting parts of the country, the best food at the cheapest prices, and a treasury of information. Artists find the picturesque places-because they are artists-and they stay because it is cheap.
Don't be a tourist. Throw away your guidebook and follow an interest. Whether your passion is architecture or orchids, child welfare or rock gardens, fishing or folkdancing, butterflies or bridge, you will find devotees everywhere.
Once, while in the greeting-card business, I made a trip to Europe looking for handmade paper and special ribbon. I found villages in France where they made nothing but ribbon, and every household a different kind. I found one family that had been making the same exquisite paper-since before Columbus discovered America. I have toured France many times-one year collecting Gothic cathedrals, another concentrating on the wines of the country-but I saw more of France, the out-of-the-way, the picturesque, when I was on a crass commercial chase for ribbon and paper.
Do you sell? Do you buy? Do you manufacture or ship? Your rivals and allies are everywhere. Whether you make bricks or lay them or throw them, the sun never sets on your co-workers, collaborators or conspirators.
Don't travel to "get away from it all." Have you an interest? A hobby? A profession? A skill? Take it with you. The Cubans have a word for tourists-"ducks"-in derisive tribute to the way tourists follow each other around, quacking to themselves, and waddling home again blissfully happy-though, while they have looked at everything, they have seen nothing. Travel with design and you broaden your knowledge; tour with idle curiosity and you flatten your arches. Don't be a"duck."

Original Article-Copyright 1939, Rotary International, 35 E. Wacker Drive, Chicago x, III. (The Rotarian, June, '39)
Condensed Version-Copyright 1939, The Reader's Digest Assn., Inc. (The Reader's Digest, June. '39)

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE interest to art galleries. Dig out a few artists and you will unearth what is most interesting parts of what is country, what is best food at what is cheapest prices, and a treasury of information. Artists find what is picturesque places-because they are artists-and they stay because it is cheap. Don't be a tourist. Throw away your guidebook and follow an interest. Whether your passion is architecture or orchids, child welfare or rock gardens, fishing or folkdancing, butterflies or bridge, you will find devotees everywhere. Once, while in what is greeting-card business, I made a trip to Europe looking for handmade paper and special ribbon. I found villages in France where they made nothing but ribbon, and every household a different kind. I found one family that had been making what is same exquisite paper-since before Columbus discovered America. I have toured France many times-one year collecting Gothic cathedrals, another concentrating on what is wines of what is country-but I saw more of France, what is out-of-the-way, what is picturesque, when I was on a crass commercial chase for ribbon and paper. Do you sell? Do you buy? Do you manufacture or ship? Your rivals and allies are everywhere. Whether you make bricks or lay them or throw them, what is sun never sets on your co-workers, collaborators or conspirators. Don't travel to "get away from it all." Have you an interest? A hobby? A profession? A s what time is it ? Take it with you. what is Cubans have a word for tourists-"ducks"-in derisive tribute to what is way tourists follow each other around, quacking to themselves, and waddling home again blissfully happy-though, while they have looked at everything, they have seen nothing. Travel with design and you broaden your knowledge; tour with idle curiosity and you flatten your arches. Don't be a"duck." where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 12 where is strong Don't Be a "DUCK" where is p align="justify" interest to art galleries. Dig out a few artists and you will unearth what is most interesting parts of what is country, what is best food at what is cheapest prices, and a treasury of information. Artists find what is picturesque places-because they are artists-and they stay because it is cheap. Don't be a tourist. Throw away your guidebook and follow an interest. Whether your passion is architecture or orchids, child welfare or rock gardens, fishing or folkdancing, butterflies or bridge, you will find devotees everywhere. Once, while in what is greeting-card business, I made a trip to Europe looking for handmade paper and special ribbon. I found villages in France where they made nothing but ribbon, and every household a different kind. I found one family that had been making what is same exquisite paper-since before Columbus discovered America. I have toured France many times-one year collecting Gothic cathedrals, another concentrating on what is wines of what is country-but I saw more of France, what is out-of-the-way, what is picturesque, when I was on a crass commercial chase for ribbon and paper. Do you sell? Do you buy? Do you manufacture or ship? Your rivals and allies are everywhere. Whether you make bricks or lay them or throw them, what is sun never sets on your co-workers, collaborators or conspirators. Don't travel to "get away from it all." Have you an interest? A hobby? A profession? A s what time is it ? Take it with you. what is Cubans have a word for tourists-"ducks"-in derisive tribute to what is way tourists follow each other around, quacking to themselves, and waddling home again blissfully happy-though, while they have looked at everything, they have seen nothing. Travel with design and you broaden your knowledge; tour with idle curiosity and you flatten your arches. Don't be a"duck." Original Article-Copyright 1939, Rotary International, 35 E. Wacker Drive, Chicago x, III. (The Rotarian, June, '39) Condensed Version-Copyright 1939, what is Reader's Digest Assn., Inc. (The Reader's Digest, June. '39) where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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