Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


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Making Habits Work for You

The tax does him no good at the time and possibly may never bring him a return. But if the fire does come, his having paid it will be his salvation from ruin. So with the man who has daily inured himself to habits of concentrated attention, energetic volition, and selfdenial in unnecessary things. He will stand like a tower when everything rocks around him, and when his softer fellow mortals are winnowed like chaff in the blast.
The hell to be endured hereafter, of which theology tells, is no worse than the hell we make for ourselves in this world by habitually fashioning our characters in the wrong way. If we realize the extent to which we are mere walking bundles of habits, we would give more heed to their formation. We are spinning our own fates, good or evil, and never to be undone. Every smallest stroke of virtue or of vice leaves its never so little scar. The drunken Rip van Winkle in Jefferson's play excuses himself for every fresh dereliction by saying, "I won't count this time!" Well! he may not count it, and a kind Heaven may not count it; but it is being counted none the less. Down among his nerve cells and fibers the molecules are counting it, registering it and storing it up to be used against him when the next temptation comes. Nothing we ever do is, in strict scientific literalness, wiped out. Of course this has its good side as well as its bad one. As we become permanent drunkards by so many separate drinks, so we become saints in the moral, and experts in the practical and scientific spheres, by so many separate acts and hours of work. Let no one have anxiety about the upshot of his education, whatever its line may be. If he keep faithfully busy each hour of the working day, he may safely leave the final result to itself. He can with perfect certainty count on waking up some fine morning, to find himself one of the competent ones of his generation, in whatever pursuit he may have singled out.

Original Material - Copyright r92o Alice H. James, and published by Henry Holt & Co., 257 Fourth Ave., New York i o, N. Y.
Condensed Version - Copyright 1937, The Reader's Digest Assn., Inc (The Reader's Digest, August, '37)

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE The tax does him no good at what is time and possibly may never bring him a return. But if what is fire does come, his having paid it will be his salvation from ruin. So with what is man who has daily inured himself to habits of concentrated attention, energetic volition, and selfdenial in unnecessary things. He will stand like a tower when everything rocks around him, and when his softer fellow mortals are winnowed like chaff in what is blast. what is fun to be endured hereafter, of which theology tells, is no worse than what is fun we make for ourselves in this world by habitually fashioning our characters in what is wrong way. If we realize what is extent to which we are mere walking bundles of habits, we would give more heed to their formation. We are spinning our own fates, good or evil, and never to be undone. Every smallest stroke of virtue or of vice leaves its never so little scar. what is drunken Rip van Winkle in Jefferson's play excuses himself for every fresh dereliction by saying, "I won't count this time!" Well! he may not count it, and a kind Heaven may not count it; but it is being counted none what is less. Down among his nerve cells and fibers what is molecules are counting it, registering it and storing it up to be used against him when what is next temptation comes. Nothing we ever do is, in strict scientific literalness, wiped out. Of course this has its good side as well as its bad one. As we become permanent drunkards by so many separate drinks, so we become saints in what is moral, and experts in what is practical and scientific spheres, by so many separate acts and hours of work. Let no one have anxiety about what is upshot of his education, whatever its line may be. If he keep faithfully busy each hour of what is working day, he may safely leave what is final result to itself. He can with perfect certainty count on waking up some fine morning, to find himself one of what is competent ones of his generation, in whatever pursuit he may have singled out. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 9 where is strong Making Habits Work for You where is p align="justify" The tax does him no good at what is time and possibly may never bring him a return. But if what is fire does come, his having paid it will be his salvation from ruin. So with what is man who has daily inured himself to habits of concentrated attention, energetic volition, and selfdenial in unnecessary things. He will stand like a tower when everything rocks around him, and when his softer fellow mortals are winnowed like chaff in what is blast. what is fun to be endured hereafter, of which theology tells, is no worse than what is fun we make for ourselves in this world by habitually fashioning our characters in what is wrong way. If we realize what is extent to which we are mere walking bundles of habits, we would give more heed to their formation. We are spinning our own fates, good or evil, and never to be undone. Every smallest stroke of virtue or of vice leaves its never so little scar. what is drunken Rip van Winkle in Jefferson's play excuses himself for every fresh dereliction by saying, "I won't count this time!" Well! he may not count it, and a kind Heaven may not count it; but it is being counted none what is less. Down among his nerve cells and fibers what is molecules are counting it, registering it and storing it up to be used against him when what is next temptation comes. Nothing we ever do is, in strict scientific literalness, wiped out. Of course this has its good side as well as its bad one. As we become permanent drunkards by so many separate drinks, so we become saints in what is moral, and experts in what is practical and scientific spheres, by so many separate acts and hours of work. Let no one have anxiety about what is upshot of his education, whatever its line may be. If he keep faithfully busy each hour of what is working day, he may safely leave what is final result to itself. He can with perfect certainty count on waking up some fine morning, to find himself one of what is competent ones of his generation, in whatever pursuit he may have singled out. Original Material - Copyright r92o Alice H. James, and published by Henry Holt & Co., 257 Fourth Ave., New York i o, N. Y. Condensed Version - Copyright 1937, what is Reader's Digest Assn., Inc (The Reader's Digest, August, '37) where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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