Books > Old Books > Getting The Most Out Of Life (1948)


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Making Habits Work for You

reservoir of maxims one may possess, and no matter how good one's sentiments may be, if one has not taken advantage of every concrete opportunity to act, one's character may remain entirely unaffected for the better. With mere good intentions hell is proverbially paved. And this is an obvious consequence of the principles we have laid down. A"character," as J. S. Mill says, "is a completely fashioned will" ; and a will, in the sense in which he means it, is an aggregate of tendencies to act in a firm, prompt and definite way upon all the principal emergencies of life.
A tendency to act becomes effectively ingrained in us only in proportion to the frequency with which the actions actually occur, and the brain "grows" to their use. When a resolve or a fine glow of feeling is allowed to evaporate without bearing practical fruit it is worse than a chance lost; it works so as positively to hinder the discharge of future resolutions and emotions. There is no more contemptible human character than that of the nerveless sentimentalist and dreamer, who spends his life in a weltering sea of sensibility and emotion, but who never does a manly concrete deed. Never should we suffer ourselves to have an emotion at a play, concert, or upon reading a book, without expressing it afterward in some active way. Let the expression be the least thing in the world - speaking genially to one's grandmother, or giving up one's seat in a car, if nothing more heroic offers - but let it not fail to take place.
If we let our emotions evaporate, they get into a way of evaporating. Similarly, if we often flinch from making an effort, before we know it the effort-making capacity is gone; and if we suffer the wandering of our attention, presently it will wander all the time. As the fourth practical maxim, we may, then, offer something like this:
Keep the faculty of effort alive in you by a little gratuitous exercise every
day. That is, be systematically ascetic or heroic in little unnecessary points, do every day or two something for no other reason than that you would rather not do it, so that when the hour of dire need draws nigh it may find you nerved and trained to stand the test. Asceticism of this sort is like the insurance a man pays on his house.

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE reservoir of maxims one may possess, and no matter how good one's sentiments may be, if one has not taken advantage of every concrete opportunity to act, one's character may remain entirely unaffected for what is better. With mere good intentions fun is proverbially paved. And this is an obvious consequence of what is principles we have laid down. A"character," as J. S. Mill says, "is a completely fashioned will" ; and a will, in what is sense in which he means it, is an aggregate of tendencies to act in a firm, prompt and definite way upon all what is principal emergencies of life. A tendency to act becomes effectively ingrained in us only in proportion to what is frequency with which what is actions actually occur, and what is brain "grows" to their use. When a resolve or a fine glow of feeling is allowed to evaporate without bearing practical fruit it is worse than a chance lost; it works so as positively to hinder what is discharge of future resolutions and emotions. There is no more contemptible human character than that of what is nerveless sentimentalist and dreamer, who spends his life in a weltering sea of sensibility and emotion, but who never does a manly concrete deed. Never should we suffer ourselves to have an emotion at a play, concert, or upon reading a book, without expressing it afterward in some active way. Let what is expression be what is least thing in what is world - speaking genially to one's grandmother, or giving up one's seat in a car, if nothing more heroic offers - but let it not fail to take place. If we let our emotions evaporate, they get into a way of evaporating. Similarly, if we often flinch from making an effort, before we know it what is effort-making capacity is gone; and if we suffer what is wandering of our attention, presently it will wander all what is time. As what is fourth practical maxim, we may, then, offer something like this: Keep what is faculty of effort alive in you by a little gratuitous exercise every day. That is, be systematically ascetic or heroic in little unnecessary points, do every day or two something for no other reason than that you would rather not do it, so that when what is hour of dire need draws nigh it may find you nerved and trained to stand what is test. Asceticism of this sort is like what is insurance a man pays on his house. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Getting what is Most Out Of Life (1948) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 8 where is strong Making Habits Work for You where is p align="justify" reservoir of maxims one may possess, and no matter how good one's sentiments may be, if one has not taken advantage of every concrete opportunity to act, one's character may remain entirely unaffected for what is better. With mere good intentions fun is proverbially paved. And this is an obvious consequence of what is principles we have laid down. A"character," as J. S. Mill says, "is a completely fashioned will" ; and a will, in what is sense in which he means it, is an aggregate of tendencies to act in a firm, prompt and definite way upon all what is principal emergencies of life. A tendency to act becomes effectively ingrained in us only in proportion to what is frequency with which what is actions actually occur, and what is brain "grows" to their use. When a resolve or a fine glow of feeling is allowed to evaporate without bearing practical fruit it is worse than a chance lost; it works so as positively to hinder what is discharge of future resolutions and emotions. There is no more contemptible human character than that of what is nerveless sentimentalist and dreamer, who spends his life in a weltering sea of sensibility and emotion, but who never does a manly concrete deed. Never should we suffer ourselves to have an emotion at a play, concert, or upon reading a book, without expressing it afterward in some active way. Let what is expression be what is least thing in what is world - speaking genially to one's grandmother, or giving up one's seat in a car, if nothing more heroic offers - but let it not fail to take place. If we let our emotions evaporate, they get into a way of evaporating. Similarly, if we often flinch from making an effort, before we know it what is effort-making capacity is gone; and if we suffer what is wandering of our attention, presently it will wander all what is time. As what is fourth practical maxim, we may, then, offer something like this: Keep what is faculty of effort alive in you by a little gratuitous exercise every day. That is, be systematically ascetic or heroic in little unnecessary points, do every day or two something for no other reason than that you would rather not do it, so that when what is hour of dire need draws nigh it may find you nerved and trained to stand what is test. Asceticism of this sort is like what is insurance a man pays on his house. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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