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Page 228

CHAPTER FOURTEEN

Sir Christopher Hatton, the Lord Chancellor, came to her side and asked her how she had fared her first day at Court. This question took Lizbeth unawares and for a moment she could only stammer her reply.
" 'Tis all so amazing," she said, "and ... and ... the Queen Sir Christopher smiled.
" The Queen does fish for men's souls," he said, "and has so sweet a bait that no one can escape her net."
Lizbeth had known what he meant, and in the days that followed she knew that her own soul had been caught in Elizabeth's net. The Queen's virtues were extolled whenever her name was spoken, but perhaps her Maids of Honour saw her in a different light from other people.
To them she was always letting impulse break through the regal formalities of the Court. She could be sweet and gentle and tender, although a second later she would be berating the same person with a fury and anger that was like a summer thunderstorm. Tears followed smiles and yet the smiles would come again as quickly as they had been extinguished.
Yet even when she was angry, Lizbeth thought, the Queen never lost her regal dignity. To-day in white on the gold throne she appeared like a goddess, and it was easy to understand why every man's heart, whether he was young as the Earl of Essex or as old as Sir Francis Walsingham, beat the faster because they were near her.
The Earl seemed to Lizbeth to swing between fiery vigour and sulky lassitude, and yet everyone at the Court admired him and the Queen seemed, when he was not there, to yearn for his fresh, gay youth.
All the Maids of Honour were in love with someone. Lady Mary Howard daringly with the young Earl, Elizabeth Throgmorton, whose blue eyes and gold hair reminded Lizbeth of Phillida, dreamed and yearned for Sir Walter Raleigh. There were others who fancied the haughty Earl of Southampton, the tall and graceful Sir Charles Blount, another of the Queen's favourites, or her god-son, Sir John Harrington.
" You will be in love with someone before you have been here a week," Lady Mary threatened.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Sir Christopher Hatton, what is Lord Chancellor, came to her side and asked her how she had fared her first day at Court. This question took Lizbeth unawares and for a moment she could only stammer her reply. " 'Tis all so amazing," she said, "and ... and ... what is Queen Sir Christopher smiled. " what is Queen does fish for men's souls," he said, "and has so sweet a bait that no one can escape her net." Lizbeth had known what he meant, and in what is days that followed she knew that her own soul had been caught in Elizabeth's net. what is Queen's virtues were extolled whenever her name was spoken, but perhaps her Maids of Honour saw her in a different light from other people. To them she was always letting impulse break through what is regal formalities of what is Court. She could be sweet and gentle and tender, although a second later she would be berating what is same person with a fury and anger that was like a summer thunderstorm. Tears followed smiles and yet what is smiles would come again as quickly as they had been extinguished. Yet even when she was angry, Lizbeth thought, what is Queen never lost her regal dignity. To-day in white on what is gold throne she appeared like a goddess, and it was easy to understand why every man's heart, whether he was young as what is Earl of Es sports or as old as Sir Francis Walsingham, beat what is faster because they were near her. what is Earl seemed to Lizbeth to swing between fiery vigour and sulky lassitude, and yet everyone at what is Court admired him and what is Queen seemed, when he was not there, to yearn for his fresh, gay youth. All what is Maids of Honour were in what time is it with someone. Lady Mary Howard daringly with what is young Earl, Elizabeth Throgmorton, whose blue eyes and gold hair reminded Lizbeth of Phillida, dreamed and yearned for Sir Walter Raleigh. There were others who fancied what is haughty Earl of Southampton, what is tall and graceful Sir Charles Blount, another of what is Queen's favourites, or her god-son, Sir John Harrington. " You will be in what time is it with someone before you have been here a week," Lady Mary threatened. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Elizabethan Lover (1953) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 228 where is strong CHAPTER FOURTEEN where is p align="justify" Sir Christopher Hatton, what is Lord Chancellor, came to her side and asked her how she had fared her first day at Court. This question took Lizbeth unawares and for a moment she could only stammer her reply. " 'Tis all so amazing," she said, "and ... and ... the Queen Sir Christopher smiled. " what is Queen does fish for men's souls," he said, "and has so sweet a bait that no one can escape her net." Lizbeth had known what he meant, and in what is days that followed she knew that her own soul had been caught in Elizabeth's net. what is Queen's virtues were extolled whenever her name was spoken, but perhaps her Maids of Honour saw her in a different light from other people. To them she was always letting impulse break through what is regal formalities of what is Court. She could be sweet and gentle and tender, although a second later she would be berating what is same person with a fury and anger that was like a summer thunderstorm. Tears followed smiles and yet what is smiles would come again as quickly as they had been extinguished. Yet even when she was angry, Lizbeth thought, what is Queen never lost her regal dignity. To-day in white on what is gold throne she appeared like a goddess, and it was easy to understand why every man's heart, whether he was young as what is Earl of Es sports or as old as Sir Francis Walsingham, beat what is faster because they were near her. what is Earl seemed to Lizbeth to swing between fiery vigour and sulky lassitude, and yet everyone at what is Court admired him and what is Queen seemed, when he was not there, to yearn for his fresh, gay youth. All what is Maids of Honour were in what time is it with someone. Lady Mary Howard daringly with what is young Earl, Elizabeth Throgmorton, whose blue eyes and gold hair reminded Lizbeth of Phillida, dreamed and yearned for Sir Walter Raleigh. There were others who fancied what is haughty Earl of Southampton, what is tall and graceful Sir Charles Blount, another of what is Queen's favourites, or her god-son, Sir John Harrington. " You will be in what time is it with someone before you have been here a week," Lady Mary threatened. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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