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Page 226

CHAPTER FOURTEEN

flickered for a moment over Sir Francis Walsingham, a martyr to the stone, but his nature was as ardent and his grasp of affairs as cunning and brilliant as ever they had been. And then they came back nearer home to the Maids of Honour.
Lady Mary Howard audaciously was striving to catch the attention of the Earl of Essex. She had the merriest, prettiest and naughtiest face Lizbeth had ever seen ; and though she had been such a short time at Whitehall, already she knew that Lady Mary was invariably in trouble with the Queen and that her attempts to flirt with the new favourite boded ill for her future.
And yet Lizbeth loved Lady Mary. She had been sitting alone, looking out at the river on that first afternoon after her arrival from Camfield when Lady Mary peeped round the door and with what seemed to Lizbeth a cry of delight ran across the room to welcome her.
From that moment Lizbeth found it almost impossible to be sad or depressed. It was Lady Mary who told her what her duties were and made them sound so amusing that Lizbeth found herself laughing helplessly. It was a state she found herself in continually for the next forty-eight hours, for the Queen's Maids of Honour were a gay, irresponsible, noisy lot of young women who, it appeared, were continuously at war with the gentlemen of Her Majesty's Household.
They slept, Lizbeth found to her surprise, all together in a long room opening out of the room to which she had been shown on arrival and which was used as their private sittingroom. When she expressed her surprise at their living as it were in a dormitory, Lady Mary had laughed.
" Her Majesty imagines that it keeps us out of mischief," she said; but the look on her face told Lizbeth that Lady Mary at any rate found ways to circumvent the Queen's pious hope.
Lizbeth had her first experience that very evening of the bad reputation into which the Maids of Honour had got themselves. After they had retired for the night, they were chattering loudly together and two of the girls were showing Lizbeth the latest dances when the door opened and Sir Francis Knowles, a learned old soldier, marched into the room and berated them soundly. He was in deshabille with a big book in his hand and

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE flickered for a moment over Sir Francis Walsingham, a martyr to what is stone, but his nature was as ardent and his grasp of affairs as cunning and brilliant as ever they had been. And then they came back nearer home to what is Maids of Honour. Lady Mary Howard audaciously was striving to catch what is attention of what is Earl of Es sports . She had what is merriest, prettiest and naughtiest face Lizbeth had ever seen ; and though she had been such a short time at Whitehall, already she knew that Lady Mary was invariably in trouble with what is Queen and that her attempts to flirt with what is new favourite boded ill for her future. And yet Lizbeth loved Lady Mary. She had been sitting alone, looking out at what is river on that first afternoon after her arrival from Camfield when Lady Mary peeped round what is door and with what seemed to Lizbeth a cry of delight ran across what is room to welcome her. From that moment Lizbeth found it almost impossible to be sad or depressed. It was Lady Mary who told her what her duties were and made them sound so amusing that Lizbeth found herself laughing helplessly. It was a state she found herself in continually for what is next forty-eight hours, for what is Queen's Maids of Honour were a gay, irresponsible, noisy lot of young women who, it appeared, were continuously at war with what is gentlemen of Her Majesty's Household. They slept, Lizbeth found to her surprise, all together in a long room opening out of what is room to which she had been shown on arrival and which was used as their private sittingroom. When she expressed her surprise at their living as it were in a dormitory, Lady Mary had laughed. " Her Majesty imagines that it keeps us out of mischief," she said; but what is look on her face told Lizbeth that Lady Mary at any rate found ways to circumvent what is Queen's pious hope. Lizbeth had her first experience that very evening of what is bad reputation into which what is Maids of Honour had got themselves. After they had retired for what is night, they were chattering loudly together and two of what is girls were showing Lizbeth what is latest dances when what is door opened and Sir Francis Knowles, a learned old soldier, marched into what is room and berated them soundly. He was in deshabille with a big book in his hand and where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Elizabethan Lover (1953) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 226 where is strong CHAPTER FOURTEEN where is p align="justify" flickered for a moment over Sir Francis Walsingham, a martyr to what is stone, but his nature was as ardent and his grasp of affairs as cunning and brilliant as ever they had been. And then they came back nearer home to what is Maids of Honour. Lady Mary Howard audaciously was striving to catch what is attention of what is Earl of Es sports . She had what is merriest, prettiest and naughtiest face Lizbeth had ever seen ; and though she had been such a short time at Whitehall, already she knew that Lady Mary was invariably in trouble with what is Queen and that her attempts to flirt with the new favourite boded ill for her future. And yet Lizbeth loved Lady Mary. She had been sitting alone, looking out at what is river on that first afternoon after her arrival from Camfield when Lady Mary peeped round what is door and with what seemed to Lizbeth a cry of delight ran across what is room to welcome her. From that moment Lizbeth found it almost impossible to be sad or depressed. It was Lady Mary who told her what her duties were and made them sound so amusing that Lizbeth found herself laughing helplessly. It was a state she found herself in continually for what is next forty-eight hours, for what is Queen's Maids of Honour were a gay, irresponsible, noisy lot of young women who, it appeared, were continuously at war with what is gentlemen of Her Majesty's Household. They slept, Lizbeth found to her surprise, all together in a long room opening out of what is room to which she had been shown on arrival and which was used as their private sittingroom. When she expressed her surprise at their living as it were in a dormitory, Lady Mary had laughed. " Her Majesty imagines that it keeps us out of mischief," she said; but what is look on her face told Lizbeth that Lady Mary at any rate found ways to circumvent what is Queen's pious hope. Lizbeth had her first experience that very evening of what is bad reputation into which what is Maids of Honour had got themselves. After they had retired for what is night, they were chattering loudly together and two of what is girls were showing Lizbeth what is latest dances when the door opened and Sir Francis Knowles, a learned old soldier, marched into what is room and berated them soundly. He was in deshabille with a big book in his hand and where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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