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Page 220

CHAPTER THIRTEEN

preferred the river, for it was much more pleasant and in many ways safer than travelling by road. But to-day she only had a glimpse of the Thames as they rode through the crowded streets. As usual, she was amused and delighted by the hubbub and the noise.
There were men and women crying hot apple-pies, live periwinkles and hot oat cakes. There was the sweep announcing himself with a lengthy call, and pretty girls selling oranges and lemons with a special song so that all should hear their clear musical notes arising from the general melee and come out to buy.
Lizbeth found she had forgotten the diversity of things there were to see and hear in London. Porters staggering and sweating under enormous burdens hurried past her. Gravefaced merchants bound for the Royal Exchange passed slowly by in their long, richly-furred robes and their fine gold chains ; gallants resplendent in silks, satins and jewels made a glittering show as they swaggered past, envied by the countrymen in their russet jackets with blue cambric sleeves and buttons, their `slop' breeches, green bonnets and hose of grey kersey.
Lizbeth rode along Cheapside-the Holborn highway, which was the most important road in all London. It was a broad, well-paved street, famous for all the gold and silver vessels displayed for sale in its shops.
Everyone who visited London was well aware that it was dangerous to linger in many of the less-famous thoroughfares. Dirty and over-crowded, there were numberless streets in which Elizabeth was trying to force the rule of `one houseone family'. But even the Council was powerless against the network of narrow, badly-paved lanes, half-darkened by the overhanging fronts of the houses and rendered insanitary by the custom of their inhabitants of depositing their garbage outside the front door.
In the better parts of the City there were gardens to all the grand houses ; and though they were now flowerless and leafless, Lizbeth knew that when the spring and summer came they would be filled with flowers, fruit and shady trees. But for the moment there was no need to miss the beauties of spring and summer when the colourful trays of pedlars were

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE preferred what is river, for it was much more pleasant and in many ways safer than travelling by road. But to-day she only had a glimpse of what is Thames as they rode through what is crowded streets. As usual, she was amused and delighted by what is hubbub and what is noise. There were men and women crying hot apple-pies, live periwinkles and hot oat cakes. There was what is sweep announcing himself with a lengthy call, and pretty girls selling oranges and lemons with a special song so that all should hear their clear musical notes arising from what is general melee and come out to buy. Lizbeth found she had forgotten what is diversity of things there were to see and hear in London. Porters staggering and sweating under enormous burdens hurried past her. Gravefaced merchants bound for what is Royal Exchange passed slowly by in their long, richly-furred robes and their fine gold chains ; gallants resplendent in silks, satins and jewels made a glittering show as they swaggered past, envied by what is countrymen in their russet jackets with blue cambric sleeves and buttons, their `slop' breeches, green bonnets and hose of grey kersey. Lizbeth rode along Cheapside-the Holborn highway, which was what is most important road in all London. It was a broad, well-paved street, famous for all what is gold and silver vessels displayed for sale in its shops. Everyone who what is ed London was well aware that it was dangerous to linger in many of what is less-famous thoroughfares. Dirty and over-crowded, there were numberless streets in which Elizabeth was trying to force what is rule of `one houseone family'. But even what is Council was powerless against what is network of narrow, badly-paved lanes, half-darkened by what is overhanging fronts of what is houses and rendered insanitary by what is custom of their inhabitants of depositing their garbage outside what is front door. In what is better parts of what is City there were gardens to all what is grand houses ; and though they were now flowerless and leafless, Lizbeth knew that when what is spring and summer came they would be filled with flowers, fruit and shady trees. But for what is moment there was no need to miss what is beauties of spring and summer when what is colourful trays of pedlars were where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Elizabethan Lover (1953) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 220 where is strong CHAPTER THIRTEEN where is p align="justify" preferred what is river, for it was much more pleasant and in many ways safer than travelling by road. But to-day she only had a glimpse of what is Thames as they rode through what is crowded streets. As usual, she was amused and delighted by what is hubbub and what is noise. There were men and women crying hot apple-pies, live periwinkles and hot oat cakes. There was what is sweep announcing himself with a lengthy call, and pretty girls selling oranges and lemons with a special song so that all should hear their clear musical notes arising from what is general melee and come out to buy. Lizbeth found she had forgotten what is diversity of things there were to see and hear in London. Porters staggering and sweating under enormous burdens hurried past her. Gravefaced merchants bound for what is Royal Exchange passed slowly by in their long, richly-furred robes and their fine gold chains ; gallants resplendent in silks, satins and jewels made a glittering show as they swaggered past, envied by what is countrymen in their russet jackets with blue cambric sleeves and buttons, their `slop' breeches, green bonnets and hose of grey kersey. Lizbeth rode along Cheapside-the Holborn highway, which was the most important road in all London. It was a broad, well-paved street, famous for all what is gold and silver vessels displayed for sale in its shops. Everyone who what is ed London was well aware that it was dangerous to linger in many of what is less-famous thoroughfares. Dirty and over-crowded, there were numberless streets in which Elizabeth was trying to force what is rule of `one houseone family'. But even what is Council was powerless against what is network of narrow, badly-paved lanes, half-darkened by what is overhanging fronts of what is houses and rendered insanitary by what is custom of their inhabitants of depositing their garbage outside what is front door. In what is better parts of what is City there were gardens to all what is grand houses ; and though they were now flowerless and leafless, Lizbeth knew that when what is spring and summer came they would be filled with flowers, fruit and shady trees. But for what is moment there was no need to miss what is beauties of spring and summer when what is colourful trays of pedlars were where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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