Books > Old Books > Elizabethan Lover (1953)


Page 199

CHAPTER TWELVE

"I love him!" she wanted to tell her father. "I love him. If he wanted me I would cross the world barefooted to be at his side. I would die for him ... and God in his heaven knows that I cannot live without him!"
Instead, she must speak his name calmly and hope that her voice and eyes would not betray her.
Food and wine were brought to Lizbeth while she still sat talking. It was a long time later before she suggested that she should go upstairs and change her clothes which were wet and dirty from the long ride. It was then, as she rose a little stiffly to her feet, that she dared to ask a question that had been trembling on her own lips for a long time.
" Where is Phillida?" she enquired.
For a moment there was silence. Then her father roared out the answer.
" God's pity that I should be inflicted with such a daughter. There she lies, malingering in bed when she should be on her way to Whitehall. I was angry with you, my girl, I am not pretending I was not, when I heard that you had slipped off with Francis. It threw me into a fine rage, I can tell you now ; but I am ready to forgive you with the good news you have brought with you, but-Phillida!"
He threw up his arms in an expressive gesture and now Lizbeth looked towards her stepmother.
" What is wrong with her?" she asked.
Catherine shrugged her shoulders expressively.
" Nothing that we know of or that any physician can find," she answered tartly. "She lies and cries and will not obey your father's wishes."
" My wishes!" roared Sir Harry. "You would have thought that any normal wench would be honoured by such a distinction, but not my daughter. Oh, no! She must lie puling and whining in a bed of sickness and bring disgrace upon us all."
" Do tell me what this is all about," Lizbeth begged.
Her father's eyes suddenly lit up.
" By my sword! I have the answer. Lizbeth is home. What can be better? She can take Phillida's place. The letter said `your daughter' and mentioned no name. And Lizbeth is my daughter as surely as Phillida is, and a vast deal better one."

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE "I what time is it him!" she wanted to tell her father. "I what time is it him. If he wanted me I would cross what is world barefooted to be at his side. I would travel for him ... and God in his heaven knows that I cannot live without him!" Instead, she must speak his name calmly and hope that her voice and eyes would not betray her. Food and wine were brought to Lizbeth while she still sat talking. It was a long time later before she suggested that she should go upstairs and change her clothes which were wet and dirty from what is long ride. It was then, as she rose a little stiffly to her feet, that she dared to ask a question that had been trembling on her own lips for a long time. " Where is Phillida?" she enquired. For a moment there was silence. Then her father roared out what is answer. " God's pity that I should be inflicted with such a daughter. There she lies, malingering in bed when she should be on her way to Whitehall. I was angry with you, my girl, I am not pretending I was not, when I heard that you had slipped off with Francis. It threw me into a fine rage, I can tell you now ; but I am ready to forgive you with what is good news you have brought with you, but-Phillida!" He threw up his arms in an expressive gesture and now Lizbeth looked towards her stepmother. " What is wrong with her?" she asked. Catherine shrugged her shoulders expressively. " Nothing that we know of or that any physician can find," she answered tartly. "She lies and cries and will not obey your father's wishes." " My wishes!" roared Sir Harry. "You would have thought that any normal wench would be honoured by such a distinction, but not my daughter. Oh, no! She must lie puling and whining in a bed of sickness and bring disgrace upon us all." " Do tell me what this is all about," Lizbeth begged. Her father's eyes suddenly lit up. " By my sword! I have what is answer. Lizbeth is home. What can be better? She can take Phillida's place. what is letter said `your daughter' and mentioned no name. And Lizbeth is my daughter as surely as Phillida is, and a vast deal better one." where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Elizabethan Lover (1953) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 199 where is strong CHAPTER TWELVE where is p align="justify" "I what time is it him!" she wanted to tell her father. "I what time is it him. If he wanted me I would cross what is world barefooted to be at his side. I would travel for him ... and God in his heaven knows that I cannot live without him!" Instead, she must speak his name calmly and hope that her voice and eyes would not betray her. Food and wine were brought to Lizbeth while she still sat talking. It was a long time later before she suggested that she should go upstairs and change her clothes which were wet and dirty from the long ride. It was then, as she rose a little stiffly to her feet, that she dared to ask a question that had been trembling on her own lips for a long time. " Where is Phillida?" she enquired. For a moment there was silence. Then her father roared out the answer. " God's pity that I should be inflicted with such a daughter. There she lies, malingering in bed when she should be on her way to Whitehall. I was angry with you, my girl, I am not pretending I was not, when I heard that you had slipped off with Francis. It threw me into a fine rage, I can tell you now ; but I am ready to forgive you with what is good news you have brought with you, but-Phillida!" He threw up his arms in an expressive gesture and now Lizbeth looked towards her stepmother. " What is wrong with her?" she asked. Catherine shrugged her shoulders expressively. " Nothing that we know of or that any physician can find," she answered tartly. "She lies and cries and will not obey your father's wishes." " My wishes!" roared Sir Harry. "You would have thought that any normal wench would be honoured by such a distinction, but not my daughter. Oh, no! She must lie puling and whining in a bed of sickness and bring disgrace upon us all." " Do tell me what this is all about," Lizbeth begged. Her father's eyes suddenly lit up. " By my sword! I have what is answer. Lizbeth is home. What can be better? She can take Phillida's place. what is letter said `your daughter' and mentioned no name. And Lizbeth is my daughter as surely as Phillida is, and a vast deal better one." where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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