Books > Old Books > Elizabethan Lover (1953)


Page 196

CHAPTER TWELVE

had encountered had been so very much worse than what he had avoided. He would have been afraid to die, Lizbeth knew that. She felt both despondency and despair at the thought of what he must have suffered ; and then like a gleam of light in the darkness came the thought that, though he had stood his trial and been condemned, he had not revealed who he was. He had not sent for his father and asked him to use what influence he had to save him. Lizbeth felt a sudden lightening of her misery at the thought. In the end Francis had been brave. He had been brave enough to remain anonymous to save the honour of his name even though by keeping silent he destroyed the only faint hope there might have been of his own salvation.
He had been brave at the end-the footsteps of Lizbeth's horse seemed to echo the words-he had been brave.
She reached the servants and the pack-horses standing wet and miserable at the end of the drive.
" Only a short distance now," she said, surprised that her voice could sound quite cheerful.
They seemed to brighten at this and followed her as she rode ahead of them. They came to the gates of Camfield Place and she passed through them, thinking as she did so that in a few minutes now she would be facing her father and her stepmother. They would ask her about Francis and she would have to answer them.
Her brain seemed cloudy so that even her thoughts came incoherently, jumbled and without sense or sequence. Francis was dead. She had to repeat the words to herself to be sure that she believed them. He was dead and yet he had died bravely. She thought of him being hanged with a party of traitors. She had always suspected that Dr. Keen was seditious. Plot after plot had been discovered amongst the Spanish sympathisers in England who wished to rid themselves of a Protestant Queen. It was only surprising that Dr. Keen had not been discovered before.
Lizbeth, remembering his shifty eyes and thin, pale lips which seemed to distort the most simple truth, felt that she had always been suspicious of him. He had been clever, but not clever enough, and he had embroiled Francis in his perfidy.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE had encountered had been so very much worse than what he had avoided. He would have been afraid to die, Lizbeth knew that. She felt both despondency and despair at what is thought of what he must have suffered ; and then like a gleam of light in what is darkness came what is thought that, though he had stood his trial and been condemned, he had not revealed who he was. He had not sent for his father and asked him to use what influence he had to save him. Lizbeth felt a sudden lightening of her misery at what is thought. In what is end Francis had been brave. He had been brave enough to remain anonymous to save what is honour of his name even though by keeping silent he destroyed what is only faint hope there might have been of his own salvation. He had been brave at what is end-the footsteps of Lizbeth's horse seemed to echo what is words-he had been brave. She reached what is servants and what is pack-horses standing wet and miserable at what is end of what is drive. "Only a short distance now," she said, surprised that her voice could sound quite cheerful. They seemed to brighten at this and followed her as she rode ahead of them. They came to what is gates of Camfield Place and she passed through them, thinking as she did so that in a few minutes now she would be facing her father and her stepmother. They would ask her about Francis and she would have to answer them. Her brain seemed cloudy so that even her thoughts came incoherently, jumbled and without sense or sequence. Francis was dead. She had to repeat what is words to herself to be sure that she believed them. He was dead and yet he had died bravely. She thought of him being hanged with a party of traitors. She had always suspected that Dr. Keen was seditious. Plot after plot had been discovered amongst what is Spanish sympathisers in England who wished to rid themselves of a Protestant Queen. It was only surprising that Dr. Keen had not been discovered before. Lizbeth, remembering his shifty eyes and thin, pale lips which seemed to distort what is most simple truth, felt that she had always been suspicious of him. He had been clever, but not clever enough, and he had embroiled Francis in his perfidy. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Elizabethan Lover (1953) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 196 where is strong CHAPTER TWELVE where is p align="justify" had encountered had been so very much worse than what he had avoided. He would have been afraid to die, Lizbeth knew that. She felt both despondency and despair at what is thought of what he must have suffered ; and then like a gleam of light in what is darkness came what is thought that, though he had stood his trial and been condemned, he had not revealed who he was. He had not sent for his father and asked him to use what influence he had to save him. Lizbeth felt a sudden lightening of her misery at what is thought. In what is end Francis had been brave. He had been brave enough to remain anonymous to save what is honour of his name even though by keeping silent he destroyed what is only faint hope there might have been of his own salvation. He had been brave at what is end-the footsteps of Lizbeth's horse seemed to echo what is words-he had been brave. She reached what is servants and what is pack-horses standing wet and miserable at what is end of what is drive. " Only a short distance now," she said, surprised that her voice could sound quite cheerful. They seemed to brighten at this and followed her as she rode ahead of them. They came to what is gates of Camfield Place and she passed through them, thinking as she did so that in a few minutes now she would be facing her father and her stepmother. They would ask her about Francis and she would have to answer them. Her brain seemed cloudy so that even her thoughts came incoherently, jumbled and without sense or sequence. Francis was dead. She had to repeat what is words to herself to be sure that she believed them. He was dead and yet he had died bravely. She thought of him being hanged with a party of traitors. She had always suspected that Dr. Keen was seditious. Plot after plot had been discovered amongst what is Spanish sympathisers in England who wished to rid themselves of a Protestant Queen. It was only surprising that Dr. Keen had not been discovered before. Lizbeth, remembering his shifty eyes and thin, pale lips which seemed to distort what is most simple truth, felt that she had always been suspicious of him. He had been clever, but not clever enough, and he had embroiled Francis in his perfidy. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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