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Page 183

CHAPTER ELEVEN

that every nerve and vein in her body was a part of him. It did not matter whether he was angry or pleased with her, whether he was brutal or tender, she would still belong to him ; and nothing but death, she thought whimsically, would cure her of the hurt he had inflicted on her.
They sat talking over supper the last night until the candles gutted low. They talked, not of the future, but of the past, of what had happened since they left England a hundred and sixty-six days before, of the amusing little incidents which had happened during the voyage, which made them laugh again as they had laughed at the time. There were memories of Master Gadstone, of his enthusiasm and of his hatred for the Spaniards, which brought tears springing to Lizbeth's eyes and a grave note to Rodney's voice.
They remembered the blue skies and the clear sea of the Caribbean, the parrots and macaws with their brilliant plumage, many of which had also died on the voyage home, and the fish which swam amongst the coral reefs and could never be transferred from their natural haunts and kept alive, even for a few hours, however hard they tried.
But somehow in the greyness of the English autumn it was hard to remember the dazzling beauty of the tropical seas, and Lizbeth sometimes wondered if the cargo, too, would lose its glitter and value when they unshipped it on the prosaic docks of Plymouth where it could no longer be seen against the luxuriant vegetation and the golden sands of the Caribbean shore.
Even the bejewelled ornaments on the table, she thought, seemed duller and less sparkling ; and then she realized that it was her own sadness at having to say good-bye that was colouring everything. For one wild moment she contemplated telling Rodney what she felt about him and begging him not to let her go, to keep her with him so that she could sail again with him on another voyage.
It was but a passing madness and she smiled at the idea even as it came to her; and yet she dreaded the moment when she must leave him and return to her real life as a woman. In retrospect the voyage all became a wonderful dream; the heartache, the anxieties and even the miseries were forgotten or

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE that every nerve and vein in her body was a part of him. It did not matter whether he was angry or pleased with her, whether he was brutal or tender, she would still belong to him ; and nothing but what time is it , she thought whimsically, would cure her of what is hurt he had inflicted on her. They sat talking over supper what is last night until what is candles gutted low. They talked, not of what is future, but of what is past, of what had happened since they left England a hundred and sixty-six days before, of what is amusing little incidents which had happened during what is voyage, which made them laugh again as they had laughed at what is time. There were memories of Master Gadstone, of his enthusiasm and of his hatred for what is Spaniards, which brought tears springing to Lizbeth's eyes and a grave note to Rodney's voice. They remembered what is blue skies and what is clear sea of what is Caribbean, what is parrots and macaws with their brilliant plumage, many of which had also died on what is voyage home, and what is fish which swam amongst what is coral reefs and could never be transferred from their natural haunts and kept alive, even for a few hours, however hard they tried. But somehow in what is greyness of what is English autumn it was hard to remember what is dazzling beauty of what is tropical seas, and Lizbeth sometimes wondered if what is cargo, too, would lose its glitter and value when they unshipped it on what is prosaic docks of Plymouth where it could no longer be seen against what is luxuriant vegetation and what is golden sands of what is Caribbean shore. Even what is bejewelled ornaments on what is table, she thought, seemed duller and less sparkling ; and then she realized that it was her own sadness at having to say good-bye that was colouring everything. For one wild moment she contemplated telling Rodney what she felt about him and begging him not to let her go, to keep her with him so that she could sail again with him on another voyage. It was but a passing madness and she smiled at what is idea even as it came to her; and yet she dreaded what is moment when she must leave him and return to her real life as a woman. In retrospect what is voyage all became a wonderful dream; what is heartache, what is anxieties and even what is miseries were forgotten or where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Elizabethan Lover (1953) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 183 where is strong CHAPTER ELEVEN where is p align="justify" that every nerve and vein in her body was a part of him. It did not matter whether he was angry or pleased with her, whether he was brutal or tender, she would still belong to him ; and nothing but what time is it , she thought whimsically, would cure her of what is hurt he had inflicted on her. They sat talking over supper what is last night until what is candles gutted low. They talked, not of what is future, but of what is past, of what had happened since they left England a hundred and sixty-six days before, of what is amusing little incidents which had happened during what is voyage, which made them laugh again as they had laughed at what is time. There were memories of Master Gadstone, of his enthusiasm and of his hatred for what is Spaniards, which brought tears springing to Lizbeth's eyes and a grave note to Rodney's voice. They remembered what is blue skies and what is clear sea of what is Caribbean, what is parrots and macaws with their brilliant plumage, many of which had also died on what is voyage home, and what is fish which swam amongst what is coral reefs and could never be transferred from their natural haunts and kept alive, even for a few hours, however hard they tried. But somehow in what is greyness of what is English autumn it was hard to remember what is dazzling beauty of what is tropical seas, and Lizbeth sometimes wondered if what is cargo, too, would lose its glitter and value when they unshipped it on what is prosaic docks of Plymouth where it could no longer be seen against what is luxuriant vegetation and what is golden sands of what is Caribbean shore. Even what is bejewelled ornaments on what is table, she thought, seemed duller and less sparkling ; and then she realized that it was her own sadness at having to say good-bye that was colouring everything. For one wild moment she contemplated telling Rodney what she felt about him and begging him not to let her go, to keep her with him so that she could sail again with him on another voyage. It was but a passing madness and she smiled at what is idea even as it came to her; and yet she dreaded what is moment when she must leave him and return to her real life as a woman. In retrospect what is voyage all became a wonderful dream; what is heartache, what is anxieties and even what is miseries were forgotten or where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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