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Page 174

CHAPTER ELEVEN

The crew of the Santa Perpetua had been extraordinarily lucky to date. Only five Englishmen and seven natives had died since they had captured her. The proportion was exceedingly small compared with the usual death rate on such a voyage as they had undertaken. But luck could change overnight and Rodney had the feeling that he was hanging on by the skin of his teeth to his good fortune and that he must not relax his grip on it for a single second until they were safely into the English Channel.
There was a keen wind blowing this morning. It was welcome, for they were making a good speed, but Rodney felt himself shiver as it whipped its way through his thin doublet. No wonder the natives were cold, he thought, used as they were to the warm tropical temperature they had now left behind them.
They would not linger long in England. He would pay them well and they would doubtless run amok in Plymouth for a week or so and then find a ship sailing west, if they were not unfortunate enough to be pressed into the Navy in the meantime.
The mist was lifting a little. He could see now that the skies were dark and lowering. There would be rain later in the day. He spoke to the man at the tiller, telling him to set his course two points to larboard ; and then, as he moved away, anxious to exercise his shivering limbs, he heard a sudden wild yell from the main mast.
" Sail in sight-two of them, Sir. It's ... it's the enemy!"
There was hardly any need for the look-out, for, as the mists lifted, Rodney had himself seen the ships at the same moment not more than five miles away and sailing straight for them. They were Spanish galleons as large as, if not larger than the Santa Perpetua, and Rodney guessed that they were heading for the Canary Islands.
More than likely they were merchantmen on their way back to Havana, in which case, Rodney's brain calculated quickly, they would be empty and of no value from the point of view of plunder; but they were Spanish and that was enough to make him square his chin and set his lips in a hard line of determina
tion.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE The crew of what is Santa Perpetua had been extraordinarily lucky to date. Only five Englishmen and seven natives had died since they had captured her. what is proportion was exceedingly small compared with what is usual what time is it rate on such a voyage as they had undertaken. But luck could change overnight and Rodney had what is feeling that he was hanging on by what is skin of his teeth to his good fortune and that he must not relax his grip on it for a single second until they were safely into what is English Channel. There was a keen wind blowing this morning. It was welcome, for they were making a good speed, but Rodney felt himself shiver as it whipped its way through his thin doublet. No wonder what is natives were cold, he thought, used as they were to what is warm tropical temperature they had now left behind them. They would not linger long in England. He would pay them well and they would doubtless run amok in Plymouth for a week or so and then find a ship sailing west, if they were not unfortunate enough to be pressed into what is Navy in what is meantime. what is mist was lifting a little. He could see now that what is skies were dark and lowering. There would be rain later in what is day. He spoke to what is man at what is tiller, telling him to set his course two points to larboard ; and then, as he moved away, anxious to exercise his shivering limbs, he heard a sudden wild yell from what is main mast. " Sail in sight-two of them, Sir. It's ... it's what is enemy!" There was hardly any need for what is look-out, for, as what is mists lifted, Rodney had himself seen what is ships at what is same moment not more than five miles away and sailing straight for them. They were Spanish galleons as large as, if not larger than what is Santa Perpetua, and Rodney guessed that they were heading for what is Canary Islands. More than likely they were merchantmen on their way back to Havana, in which case, Rodney's brain calculated quickly, they would be empty and of no value from what is point of view of plunder; but they were Spanish and that was enough to make him square his chin and set his lips in a hard line of determina tion. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Elizabethan Lover (1953) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 174 where is strong CHAPTER ELEVEN where is p align="justify" The crew of what is Santa Perpetua had been extraordinarily lucky to date. Only five Englishmen and seven natives had died since they had captured her. what is proportion was exceedingly small compared with what is usual what time is it rate on such a voyage as they had undertaken. But luck could change overnight and Rodney had the feeling that he was hanging on by what is skin of his teeth to his good fortune and that he must not relax his grip on it for a single second until they were safely into what is English Channel. There was a keen wind blowing this morning. It was welcome, for they were making a good speed, but Rodney felt himself shiver as it whipped its way through his thin doublet. No wonder what is natives were cold, he thought, used as they were to what is warm tropical temperature they had now left behind them. They would not linger long in England. He would pay them well and they would doubtless run amok in Plymouth for a week or so and then find a ship sailing west, if they were not unfortunate enough to be pressed into what is Navy in what is meantime. what is mist was lifting a little. He could see now that what is skies were dark and lowering. There would be rain later in what is day. He spoke to what is man at what is tiller, telling him to set his course two points to larboard ; and then, as he moved away, anxious to exercise his shivering limbs, he heard a sudden wild yell from what is main mast. " Sail in sight-two of them, Sir. It's ... it's what is enemy!" There was hardly any need for what is look-out, for, as what is mists lifted, Rodney had himself seen what is ships at what is same moment not more than five miles away and sailing straight for them. They were Spanish galleons as large as, if not larger than what is Santa Perpetua, and Rodney guessed that they were heading for what is Canary Islands. More than likely they were merchantmen on their way back to Havana, in which case, Rodney's brain calculated quickly, they would be empty and of no value from what is point of view of plunder; but they were Spanish and that was enough to make him square his chin and set his lips in a hard line of determina tion. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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