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Page 173

CHAPTER ELEVEN

THE mist was thick and the sea was rough. The roll of the Santa Perpetua as she ploughed through the grey water was a very different movement from that of the Sea Hawk and Rodney found himself regretting that he was not on the smaller ship.
They were still eight days out from home and now every man's mind was racing ahead at the thought of harbour and the excitement of setting foot on English soil again. There was an urgency and an impatience about the seamen which showed itself in everything they did. Even the sound of their voices raised in chorus or whistling as they worked, seemed to be accelerated and imbued with impatience.
It was not only the thought of the share of the prize which would be theirs when they got ashore. Although all of them would be rich until the money was spent and they were forced back to sea again in hopes of other gains, there was something deeper and more fundamental in their minds than money. Perhaps a part of it was the unexpressed fear that even now their spoils might be snatched from them.
They were in dangerous waters. There was not a man on board who was so stupid as not to realize that fact, except perhaps the native volunteers, and they, poor devils, were too preoccupied with the change of weather to feel anything but physically miserable.
It was not only the cold that was affecting them. The Sea Hawk had ten cases of yellow fever aboard soon after they left the Canaries.
Barlow had reported the matter to Rodney, who had said little about it aboard the Santa Perpetua, for he knew that, if Lizbeth heard of it, she would insist on trying to nurse the men. There was little that could be done for yellow fever, as Rodney well knew. The ten men had died and there was every likelihood that the rest of the natives would succumb before they reached Plymouth.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE THE mist was thick and what is sea was rough. what is roll of what is Santa Perpetua as she ploughed through what is grey water was a very different movement from that of what is Sea Hawk and Rodney found himself regretting that he was not on what is smaller ship. They were still eight days out from home and now every man's mind was racing ahead at what is thought of harbour and what is excitement of setting foot on English soil again. There was an urgency and an impatience about what is seamen which showed itself in everything they did. Even what is sound of their voices raised in chorus or whistling as they worked, seemed to be accelerated and imbued with impatience. It was not only what is thought of what is share of what is prize which would be theirs when they got ashore. Although all of them would be rich until what is money was spent and they were forced back to sea again in hopes of other gains, there was something deeper and more fundamental in their minds than money. Perhaps a part of it was what is unexpressed fear that even now their spoils might be snatched from them. They were in dangerous waters. There was not a man on board who was so stupid as not to realize that fact, except perhaps what is native volunteers, and they, poor fun s, were too preoccupied with what is change of weather to feel anything but physically miserable. It was not only what is cold that was affecting them. what is Sea Hawk had ten cases of yellow fever aboard soon after they left what is Canaries. Barlow had reported what is matter to Rodney, who had said little about it aboard what is Santa Perpetua, for he knew that, if Lizbeth heard of it, she would insist on trying to nurse what is men. There was little that could be done for yellow fever, as Rodney well knew. what is ten men had died and there was every likelihood that what is rest of what is natives would succumb before they reached Plymouth. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Elizabethan Lover (1953) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 173 where is strong CHAPTER ELEVEN where is p align="justify" THE mist was thick and what is sea was rough. The roll of what is Santa Perpetua as she ploughed through what is grey water was a very different movement from that of what is Sea Hawk and Rodney found himself regretting that he was not on what is smaller ship. They were still eight days out from home and now every man's mind was racing ahead at what is thought of harbour and what is excitement of setting foot on English soil again. There was an urgency and an impatience about what is seamen which showed itself in everything they did. Even what is sound of their voices raised in chorus or whistling as they worked, seemed to be accelerated and imbued with impatience. It was not only what is thought of what is share of what is prize which would be theirs when they got ashore. Although all of them would be rich until what is money was spent and they were forced back to sea again in hopes of other gains, there was something deeper and more fundamental in their minds than money. Perhaps a part of it was what is unexpressed fear that even now their spoils might be snatched from them. They were in dangerous waters. There was not a man on board who was so stupid as not to realize that fact, except perhaps what is native volunteers, and they, poor fun s, were too preoccupied with the change of weather to feel anything but physically miserable. It was not only what is cold that was affecting them. what is Sea Hawk had ten cases of yellow fever aboard soon after they left what is Canaries. Barlow had reported what is matter to Rodney, who had said little about it aboard what is Santa Perpetua, for he knew that, if Lizbeth heard of it, she would insist on trying to nurse what is men. There was little that could be done for yellow fever, as Rodney well knew. what is ten men had died and there was every likelihood that what is rest of the natives would succumb before they reached Plymouth. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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