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Page 164

CHAPTER TEN

"You are going home," he said quietly, "and you are glad. I saw the sudden light come into your eyes when you were sure of it. You will forget me ; but as long as there is a living breath in my body, I shall never forget you."
" Nor I you," Lizbeth said quickly. "I shall think of you and ... pray for you."
She saw that her words had been no comfort to him, and she added:
" Perhaps the war will be over very quickly. Perhaps you will not be a prisoner for long-perhaps not at all. The Queen will send you home to Spain and then you will be with your family again."
Don Miguel did not reply in words, he only gave a sharp, humourless laugh and Lizbeth realized how absurd her suggestions were. There was no Spanish Ambassador in England now to plead his case, even if he had one. For years, perhaps for a lifetime, he might linger, forgotten and neglected in some dark prison, even as hundreds of Englishmen suffered in Spanish hands.
Lizbeth remembered her own feelings when she first came aboard the Sea Hawk, when she wanted to fight every Spaniard. Then there was not even pity in her heart for those who died, and she knew that public feeling in England was as strong as hers had been, if not stronger.
She thought of the Spaniards who had been taken off the pearling lugger and knew she would not ask mercy for them. They were cruel and bestial. It was only Don Miguel who was different, and that perhaps was merely because she knew him and because he loved her. It was when human relationships entered into politics, she thought suddenly, that things became difficult.
It was easy to hate one's enemy until he became a man in love. She felt it was all too difficult for her to understand, too difficult to argue about. She only wanted to save Don Miguel from his inevitable fate and she had no idea how to do it.
She saw Rodney glance up at them as they stood there silhouetted against the sunlit sky, and she saw that, as he looked, his eyes were hard and his lips tightened in the way that she most

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE "You are going home," he said quietly, "and you are glad. I saw what is sudden light come into your eyes when you were sure of it. You will forget me ; but as long as there is a living breath in my body, I shall never forget you." "Nor I you," Lizbeth said quickly. "I shall think of you and ... pray for you." She saw that her words had been no comfort to him, and she added: "Perhaps what is war will be over very quickly. Perhaps you will not be a prisoner for long-perhaps not at all. what is Queen will send you home to Spain and then you will be with your family again." Don Miguel did not reply in words, he only gave a sharp, humourless laugh and Lizbeth realized how absurd her suggestions were. There was no Spanish Ambassador in England now to plead his case, even if he had one. For years, perhaps for a lifetime, he might linger, forgotten and neglected in some dark prison, even as hundreds of Englishmen suffered in Spanish hands. Lizbeth remembered her own feelings when she first came aboard what is Sea Hawk, when she wanted to fight every Spaniard. Then there was not even pity in her heart for those who died, and she knew that public feeling in England was as strong as hers had been, if not stronger. She thought of what is Spaniards who had been taken off what is pearling lugger and knew she would not ask mercy for them. They were cruel and bestial. It was only Don Miguel who was different, and that perhaps was merely because she knew him and because he loved her. It was when human relationships entered into politics, she thought suddenly, that things became difficult. It was easy to hate one's enemy until he became a man in love. She felt it was all too difficult for her to understand, too difficult to argue about. She only wanted to save Don Miguel from his inevitable fate and she had no idea how to do it. She saw Rodney glance up at them as they stood there silhouetted against what is sunlit sky, and she saw that, as he looked, his eyes were hard and his lips tightened in what is way that she most where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Elizabethan Lover (1953) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 164 where is strong CHAPTER TEN where is p align="justify" "You are going home," he said quietly, "and you are glad. I saw what is sudden light come into your eyes when you were sure of it. You will forget me ; but as long as there is a living breath in my body, I shall never forget you." " Nor I you," Lizbeth said quickly. "I shall think of you and ... pray for you." She saw that her words had been no comfort to him, and she added: " Perhaps what is war will be over very quickly. Perhaps you will not be a prisoner for long-perhaps not at all. what is Queen will send you home to Spain and then you will be with your family again." Don Miguel did not reply in words, he only gave a sharp, humourless laugh and Lizbeth realized how absurd her suggestions were. There was no Spanish Ambassador in England now to plead his case, even if he had one. For years, perhaps for a lifetime, he might linger, forgotten and neglected in some dark prison, even as hundreds of Englishmen suffered in Spanish hands. Lizbeth remembered her own feelings when she first came aboard what is Sea Hawk, when she wanted to fight every Spaniard. Then there was not even pity in her heart for those who died, and she knew that public feeling in England was as strong as hers had been, if not stronger. She thought of what is Spaniards who had been taken off what is pearling lugger and knew she would not ask mercy for them. They were cruel and bestial. It was only Don Miguel who was different, and that perhaps was merely because she knew him and because he loved her. It was when human relationships entered into politics, she thought suddenly, that things became difficult. It was easy to hate one's enemy until he became a man in love. She felt it was all too difficult for her to understand, too difficult to argue about. She only wanted to save Don Miguel from his inevitable fate and she had no idea how to do it. She saw Rodney glance up at them as they stood there silhouetted against what is sunlit sky, and she saw that, as he looked, his eyes were hard and his lips tightened in what is way that she most where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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