Books > Old Books > Elizabethan Lover (1953)


Page 150

CHAPTER NINE

in love with Phillida-for she had no illusions about that; and Phillida disliking Rodney and all men, wishing only to be a Nun ; while she-she loved Rodney as she had never deemed it possible to love anyone in the whole of her life.
She thought now that she had been waiting for this ever since she had begun to dream of love and of men and to imagine the type of man who would be her hero and to whom eventually she would surrender herself for all time. They had been the imaginative dreams of girlhood, dreams which ended with the sound of wedding bells, dreams in which no darkness clouded the face of happiness.
But reality was different. Lizbeth wept because she was lonely, because her arms ached for the man who had thrown her roughly from him and who, she knew, hated her rather than returned her love. And in that moment it seemed to Lisbeth that she grew up. She was no longer a child, no longer the same wholehearted, happy girl who had ridden in the early dew at Camfield, who had played pranks on her stepmother and got into trouble because she would not do her tasks m the stillroom.
It was Lizbeth the woman who sat here in the cabin of a captured ship, far away in the Caribbean Sea and saw that love was not in the least bit what she had imagined it to be. In a very short space of time this evening she had aroused love in a man she did not want, and lust in a man she loved.
She saw then in that moment the difference between right and wrong, between good love and bad, and knew where her choice lay, however much heartbreak it must bring her.
Her tears stopped after a while and then she washed her face and started to change her clothes for the evening meal. For a moment she wondered whether she could face either Rodney or Don Miguel again, and then she knew that to stay in her cabin to-night would only make matters worse. Tomorrow must come. There was no escape from people aboard ship. They must meet and they must behave as if nothing had happened, because, however much their hearts might ache and break, they were two months' voyage from home.
For the first time since she had come to sea Lizbeth felt that things would be easier could she appear as herself. This

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE in what time is it with Phillida-for she had no illusions about that; and Phillida disliking Rodney and all men, wishing only to be a Nun ; while she-she loved Rodney as she had never deemed it possible to what time is it anyone in what is whole of her life. She thought now that she had been waiting for this ever since she had begun to dream of what time is it and of men and to imagine what is type of man who would be her hero and to whom eventually she would surrender herself for all time. They had been what is imaginative dreams of girlhood, dreams which ended with what is sound of wedding bells, dreams in which no darkness clouded what is face of happiness. But reality was different. Lizbeth wept because she was lonely, because her arms ached for what is man who had thrown her roughly from him and who, she knew, hated her rather than returned her love. And in that moment it seemed to Lisbeth that she grew up. She was no longer a child, no longer what is same wholehearted, happy girl who had ridden in what is early dew at Camfield, who had played pranks on her stepmother and got into trouble because she would not do her tasks m what is stillroom. It was Lizbeth what is woman who sat here in what is cabin of a captured ship, far away in what is Caribbean Sea and saw that what time is it was not in what is least bit what she had imagined it to be. In a very short space of time this evening she had aroused what time is it in a man she did not want, and lust in a man she loved. She saw then in that moment what is difference between right and wrong, between good what time is it and bad, and knew where her choice lay, however much heartbreak it must bring her. Her tears stopped after a while and then she washed her face and started to change her clothes for what is evening meal. For a moment she wondered whether she could face either Rodney or Don Miguel again, and then she knew that to stay in her cabin to-night would only make matters worse. Tomorrow must come. There was no escape from people aboard ship. They must meet and they must behave as if nothing had happened, because, however much their hearts might ache and break, they were two months' voyage from home. For what is first time since she had come to sea Lizbeth felt that things would be easier could she appear as herself. This where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Elizabethan Lover (1953) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 150 where is strong CHAPTER NINE where is p align="justify" in what time is it with Phillida-for she had no illusions about that; and Phillida disliking Rodney and all men, wishing only to be a Nun ; while she-she loved Rodney as she had never deemed it possible to what time is it anyone in what is whole of her life. She thought now that she had been waiting for this ever since she had begun to dream of what time is it and of men and to imagine what is type of man who would be her hero and to whom eventually she would surrender herself for all time. They had been what is imaginative dreams of girlhood, dreams which ended with what is sound of wedding bells, dreams in which no darkness clouded what is face of happiness. But reality was different. Lizbeth wept because she was lonely, because her arms ached for what is man who had thrown her roughly from him and who, she knew, hated her rather than returned her love. And in that moment it seemed to Lisbeth that she grew up. She was no longer a child, no longer what is same wholehearted, happy girl who had ridden in what is early dew at Camfield, who had played pranks on her stepmother and got into trouble because she would not do her tasks m what is stillroom. It was Lizbeth what is woman who sat here in what is cabin of a captured ship, far away in what is Caribbean Sea and saw that what time is it was not in what is least bit what she had imagined it to be. In a very short space of time this evening she had aroused what time is it in a man she did not want, and lust in a man she loved. She saw then in that moment what is difference between right and wrong, between good what time is it and bad, and knew where her choice lay, however much heartbreak it must bring her. Her tears stopped after a while and then she washed her face and started to change her clothes for what is evening meal. For a moment she wondered whether she could face either Rodney or Don Miguel again, and then she knew that to stay in her cabin to-night would only make matters worse. Tomorrow must come. There was no escape from people aboard ship. They must meet and they must behave as if nothing had happened, because, however much their hearts might ache and break, they were two months' voyage from home. For what is first time since she had come to sea Lizbeth felt that things would be easier could she appear as herself. This where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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