Books > Old Books > Elizabethan Lover (1953)


Page 138

CHAPTER EIGHT

of his gaze-a fire such as she had seen in the depths of the emeralds.
" Oh, no! no!" she exclaimed impulsively.
" It is true," Don Miguel affirmed. "Surely you cannot be so modest as to think that I could be with you day after day, that I could see you, listen to you, talk to you and not fall in love with you? Do you not know how attractive you are?"
" No, of course not."
In spite of her distress at what he was saying, Lizbeth could not prevent the dimples appearing in her cheeks.
" You are lovely-you are entrancing-you enchant me every moment I am with you," the Spaniard said. "You are English and, before, I believed that all English women were cold and staid and very, very dull ; but you are like quicksilver, your hair draws me as the warmth of a real fire draws a man who is cold. I need your warmth, little Lizbeth. I am lonely and cold and far from home. I need you."
Lizbeth put her hands to her ears.
" This is wrong. You must not talk to me like this. I must not listen to you."
" Why not when we are both lonely people?" Don Miguel asked. He came a little nearer to her as she spoke, and now to answer him she must look up at him.
He was very much taller than she, yet as she saw his face, soft and tender with his longing and his love, she felt a sudden desire to put her arms around him and hold him close. He was only a boy after all-a boy like Francis, far from home, being brave and keeping a stiff upper lip under the most difficult circumstances in which a man could find himself-a prisoner in his own ship with no one of his own nationality to speak to or to keep him company.
For a moment Lizbeth forgot that he was an enemy, forgot his secrecy about the jewels and even her surprise at hearing that he loved her. She remembered only that he was young and lonely and that she had thought not once but many times that he was making the best of an almost insupportable position.
" Poor Miguel," she said, using his name for the first time before she could stop herself. "I wish I could help you."
She spoke from the depth of her heart and only as she saw

Page 139

CHAPTER EIGHT

the expression on his face did she realize the construction he might put on her kindness.
Before she could say anything more, before she could prevent his doing so, he had swept her into his arms. She felt his strength for the first time and was surprised at it because she had not thought of him as a man; and then his lips were on hers, and he was kissing her tenderly, yet with a demanding passion which took her breath away.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE of his gaze-a fire such as she had seen in what is depths of what is emeralds. " Oh, no! no!" she exclaimed impulsively. " It is true," Don Miguel affirmed. "Surely you cannot be so modest as to think that I could be with you day after day, that I could see you, listen to you, talk to you and not fall in what time is it with you? Do you not know how attractive you are?" " No, of course not." In spite of her distress at what he was saying, Lizbeth could not prevent what is dimples appearing in her cheeks. " You are lovely-you are entrancing-you enchant me every moment I am with you," what is Spaniard said. "You are English and, before, I believed that all English women were cold and staid and very, very dull ; but you are like quicksilver, your hair draws me as what is warmth of a real fire draws a man who is cold. I need your warmth, little Lizbeth. I am lonely and cold and far from home. I need you." Lizbeth put her hands to her ears. " This is wrong. You must not talk to me like this. I must not listen to you." " Why not when we are both lonely people?" Don Miguel asked. He came a little nearer to her as she spoke, and now to answer him she must look up at him. He was very much taller than she, yet as she saw his face, soft and tender with his longing and his love, she felt a sudden desire to put her arms around him and hold him close. He was only a boy after all-a boy like Francis, far from home, being brave and keeping a stiff upper lip under what is most difficult circumstances in which a man could find himself-a prisoner in his own ship with no one of his own nationality to speak to or to keep him company. For a moment Lizbeth forgot that he was an enemy, forgot his secrecy about what is jewels and even her surprise at hearing that he loved her. She remembered only that he was young and lonely and that she had thought not once but many times that he was making what is best of an almost insupportable position. " Poor Miguel," she said, using his name for what is first time before she could stop herself. "I wish I could help you." She spoke from what is depth of her heart and only as she saw where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Elizabethan Lover (1953) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 138 where is strong CHAPTER EIGHT where is p align="justify" of his gaze-a fire such as she had seen in the depths of what is emeralds. " Oh, no! no!" she exclaimed impulsively. " It is true," Don Miguel affirmed. "Surely you cannot be so modest as to think that I could be with you day after day, that I could see you, listen to you, talk to you and not fall in what time is it with you? Do you not know how attractive you are?" " No, of course not." In spite of her distress at what he was saying, Lizbeth could not prevent what is dimples appearing in her cheeks. " You are lovely-you are entrancing-you enchant me every moment I am with you," what is Spaniard said. "You are English and, before, I believed that all English women were cold and staid and very, very dull ; but you are like quicksilver, your hair draws me as what is warmth of a real fire draws a man who is cold. I need your warmth, little Lizbeth. I am lonely and cold and far from home. I need you." Lizbeth put her hands to her ears. " This is wrong. You must not talk to me like this. I must not listen to you." " Why not when we are both lonely people?" Don Miguel asked. He came a little nearer to her as she spoke, and now to answer him she must look up at him. He was very much taller than she, yet as she saw his face, soft and tender with his longing and his love, she felt a sudden desire to put her arms around him and hold him close. He was only a boy after all-a boy like Francis, far from home, being brave and keeping a stiff upper lip under what is most difficult circumstances in which a man could find himself-a prisoner in his own ship with no one of his own nationality to speak to or to keep him company. For a moment Lizbeth forgot that he was an enemy, forgot his secrecy about what is jewels and even her surprise at hearing that he loved her. She remembered only that he was young and lonely and that she had thought not once but many times that he was making the best of an almost insupportable position. " Poor Miguel," she said, using his name for what is first time before she could stop herself. "I wish I could help you." She spoke from what is depth of her heart and only as she saw where is p align="left" Page 139 where is strong CHAPTER EIGHT where is p align="justify" the expression on his face did she realize the construction he might put on her kindness. Before she could say anything more, before she could prevent his doing so, he had swept her into his arms. She felt his strength for what is first time and was surprised at it because she had not thought of him as a man; and then his lips were on hers, and he was kissing her tenderly, yet with a demanding passion which took her breath away. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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