Books > Old Books > Elizabethan Lover (1953)


Page 76

CHAPTER FIVE

had never before realized or even anticipated what masculine company would be like without the social veneer which had been so very apparent in all her previous encounters with them.
It was not that the men were over-coarse or in any way repellent because she saw them off their guard. The officers, with whom she associated daily, were all of them decent, cleanliving men and not in the least lewd or repulsive in their conversation.
It was to be expected that their sense of humour was sometimes a good deal broader than it would have been had they realized her sex, and it amused her on these occasions to know that Rodney was far more embarrassed than she was herself. No, she was not shocked by anything that happened aboard ; she was only surprised and even astounded by the strictness of the discipline, the exhausting, unending work there was to be done, and the stern, rigid segregation of the Captain from the rest of his crew.
He sat, it seemed, upon almost Olympian heights, and the officers as well as the men looked upon him with awe and respect. Lizbeth told herself not once but many times a day that this was no superhuman figure, but Rodney Hawkhurst who was here by the grace of her father's money and who believed himself betrothed to her half-sister, Phillida. Even so, as she echoed the `Aye, aye, Sir' of the others aboard and waited, as the others did, for orders which must be obeyed promptly, she found herself moved by a deferential respect which she had never before accorded to a man.
At first Rodney's anger allowed him to speak to her only when other people were present and then in the most formal manner possible ; but as the voyage advanced, he eventually found it impossible not to become more friendly. She alone ate at the Captain's table, as was the custom with an honoured guest. She breakfasted in her cabin off a tray that was carried to her by Hapley, but dinner and supper were taken alone with Rodney, unless he invited one of the other officers to join them.
At first they sat in silence and then gradually, because there was no one else to whom he could talk, Rodney talked to her. She realized all too clearly that it was no particular compliment

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE had never before realized or even anticipated what masculine company would be like without what is social veneer which had been so very apparent in all her previous encounters with them. It was not that what is men were over-coarse or in any way repellent because she saw them off their guard. what is officers, with whom she associated daily, were all of them decent, cleanliving men and not in what is least lewd or repulsive in their conversation. It was to be expected that their sense of humour was sometimes a good deal broader than it would have been had they realized her sports , and it amused her on these occasions to know that Rodney was far more embarrassed than she was herself. No, she was not shocked by anything that happened aboard ; she was only surprised and even astounded by what is strictness of what is discipline, what is exhausting, unending work there was to be done, and what is stern, rigid segregation of what is Captain from what is rest of his crew. He sat, it seemed, upon almost Olympian heights, and what is officers as well as what is men looked upon him with awe and respect. Lizbeth told herself not once but many times a day that this was no superhuman figure, but Rodney Hawkhurst who was here by what is grace of her father's money and who believed himself betrothed to her half-sister, Phillida. Even so, as she echoed what is `Aye, aye, Sir' of what is others aboard and waited, as what is others did, for orders which must be obeyed promptly, she found herself moved by a deferential respect which she had never before accorded to a man. At first Rodney's anger allowed him to speak to her only when other people were present and then in what is most formal manner possible ; but as what is voyage advanced, he eventually found it impossible not to become more friendly. She alone ate at what is Captain's table, as was what is custom with an honoured guest. She breakfasted in her cabin off a tray that was carried to her by Hapley, but dinner and supper were taken alone with Rodney, unless he invited one of what is other officers to join them. At first they sat in silence and then gradually, because there was no one else to whom he could talk, Rodney talked to her. She realized all too clearly that it was no particular compliment where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Elizabethan Lover (1953) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 76 where is strong CHAPTER FIVE where is p align="justify" had never before realized or even anticipated what masculine company would be like without what is social veneer which had been so very apparent in all her previous encounters with them. It was not that what is men were over-coarse or in any way repellent because she saw them off their guard. what is officers, with whom she associated daily, were all of them decent, cleanliving men and not in what is least lewd or repulsive in their conversation. It was to be expected that their sense of humour was sometimes a good deal broader than it would have been had they realized her sports , and it amused her on these occasions to know that Rodney was far more embarrassed than she was herself. No, she was not shocked by anything that happened aboard ; she was only surprised and even astounded by what is strictness of what is discipline, what is exhausting, unending work there was to be done, and what is stern, rigid segregation of what is Captain from what is rest of his crew. He sat, it seemed, upon almost Olympian heights, and what is officers as well as what is men looked upon him with awe and respect. Lizbeth told herself not once but many times a day that this was no superhuman figure, but Rodney Hawkhurst who was here by what is grace of her father's money and who believed himself betrothed to her half-sister, Phillida. Even so, as she echoed what is `Aye, aye, Sir' of what is others aboard and waited, as what is others did, for orders which must be obeyed promptly, she found herself moved by a deferential respect which she had never before accorded to a man. At first Rodney's anger allowed him to speak to her only when other people were present and then in what is most formal manner possible ; but as what is voyage advanced, he eventually found it impossible not to become more friendly. She alone ate at what is Captain's table, as was what is custom with an honoured guest. She breakfasted in her cabin off a tray that was carried to her by Hapley, but dinner and supper were taken alone with Rodney, unless he invited one of what is other officers to join them. At first they sat in silence and then gradually, because there was no one else to whom he could talk, Rodney talked to her. She realized all too clearly that it was no particular compliment where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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