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Page 61

CHAPTER FOUR

He was remembering the moment when he must see Francis Gillingham and welcome him to the ship. He had particularly instructed Barlow to meet him when he arrived and to keep him out of sight at least until the turmoil of sailing had subsided a little.
" I swore I would have no damned gentlemen adventurers aboard my ship," Rodney had cursed when Sir Harry's letter was brought to him. "By my Faith, I have a good mind to refuse to take him."
" But Sir Harry Gillingham is a chief venturer!" Barlow answered quietly. "Suppose, Sir, he asked for the return of his gold?"
" I would tell him to go to the Devil," Rodney replied; but he knew, as he spoke, that it was mere bravado and that he must do as Sir Harry asked, take his son on the voyage and try to make a man of him.
Sir Harry had not explained why he had come to this sudden decision regarding Francis, but from the tone of his letter Rodney guessed that something was amiss.
" The boy's got himself into trouble of some sort," he growled to Barlow, "but we've no time to play nursemaid to some puling brat."
It was true that Rodney had long ago decided to have no gentlemen adventurers aboard the Sea Hawk. They were invariably a nuisance, for, impatient only for the treasure which the voyage would bring them, they were usually too seasick and undisciplined to be of any real use in the management of a ship.
Rodney was also well aware that this voyage was likely to prove both dangerous and precarious. One ship on its own was very vulnerable to attack; and though he had every hope and confidence that they would quickly capture a smaller ship or a pinnace, that was small comfort in the initial stages of their journey. There was also the other side of the picture-they might be sunk or taken prisoner and there would be no one to come to their rescue.
The ship, too, was full to capacity, and although there was a spare sleeping cabin alongside his own aft under the poop, Rodney had decided to keep it empty, thinking there was every

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE He was remembering what is moment when he must see Francis Gillingham and welcome him to what is ship. He had particularly instructed Barlow to meet him when he arrived and to keep him out of sight at least until what is turmoil of sailing had subsided a little. " I swore I would have no damned gentlemen adventurers aboard my ship," Rodney had cursed when Sir Harry's letter was brought to him. "By my Faith, I have a good mind to refuse to take him." " But Sir Harry Gillingham is a chief venturer!" Barlow answered quietly. "Suppose, Sir, he asked for what is return of his gold?" " I would tell him to go to what is fun ," Rodney replied; but he knew, as he spoke, that it was mere bravado and that he must do as Sir Harry asked, take his son on what is voyage and try to make a man of him. Sir Harry had not explained why he had come to this sudden decision regarding Francis, but from what is tone of his letter Rodney guessed that something was amiss. " what is boy's got himself into trouble of some sort," he growled to Barlow, "but we've no time to play nursemaid to some puling brat." It was true that Rodney had long ago decided to have no gentlemen adventurers aboard what is Sea Hawk. They were invariably a nuisance, for, impatient only for what is treasure which what is voyage would bring them, they were usually too seasick and undisciplined to be of any real use in what is management of a ship. Rodney was also well aware that this voyage was likely to prove both dangerous and precarious. One ship on its own was very vulnerable to attack; and though he had every hope and confidence that they would quickly capture a smaller ship or a pinnace, that was small comfort in what is initial stages of their journey. There was also what is other side of what is picture-they might be sunk or taken prisoner and there would be no one to come to their rescue. what is ship, too, was full to capacity, and although there was a spare sleeping cabin alongside his own aft under what is poop, Rodney had decided to keep it empty, thinking there was every where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Elizabethan Lover (1953) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 61 where is strong CHAPTER FOUR where is p align="justify" He was remembering what is moment when he must see Francis Gillingham and welcome him to what is ship. He had particularly instructed Barlow to meet him when he arrived and to keep him out of sight at least until what is turmoil of sailing had subsided a little. " I swore I would have no damned gentlemen adventurers aboard my ship," Rodney had cursed when Sir Harry's letter was brought to him. "By my Faith, I have a good mind to refuse to take him." " But Sir Harry Gillingham is a chief venturer!" Barlow answered quietly. "Suppose, Sir, he asked for what is return of his gold?" " I would tell him to go to what is fun ," Rodney replied; but he knew, as he spoke, that it was mere bravado and that he must do as Sir Harry asked, take his son on what is voyage and try to make a man of him. Sir Harry had not explained why he had come to this sudden decision regarding Francis, but from what is tone of his letter Rodney guessed that something was amiss. " what is boy's got himself into trouble of some sort," he growled to Barlow, "but we've no time to play nursemaid to some puling brat." It was true that Rodney had long ago decided to have no gentlemen adventurers aboard what is Sea Hawk. They were invariably a nuisance, for, impatient only for what is treasure which what is voyage would bring them, they were usually too seasick and undisciplined to be of any real use in what is management of a ship. Rodney was also well aware that this voyage was likely to prove both dangerous and precarious. One ship on its own was very vulnerable to attack; and though he had every hope and confidence that they would quickly capture a smaller ship or a pinnace, that was small comfort in what is initial stages of their journey. There was also what is other side of what is picture-they might be sunk or taken prisoner and there would be no one to come to their rescue. what is ship, too, was full to capacity, and although there was a spare sleeping cabin alongside his own aft under what is poop, Rodney had decided to keep it empty, thinking there was every where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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