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Page 55

CHAPTER THREE

Sir Harry, despite the fact that he was wearing only a nightshirt, was awe-inspiring. He stood leaning against an heraldic newel at the head of the stairs, his candle in his hand, his face red with anger, his heavy eyebrows almost meeting across his forehead. He stared down into the hall at Lizbeth and Francis and then his voice rang out in a sudden roar.
" Come here, both of you!"
It seemed to Lizbeth that the stairs ascended endlessly. She felt as if she and Francis would never reach the top. As they walked up step by step, Francis' boots making enough noise now to rouse the whole house, Lizbeth could feel his courage and the elation and happiness of the mood in which he had returned home ebbing away from him slowly but surely.
He had never been able to stand up to his father. He had always been afraid of him since he was a little boy; and long before they reached the top Lizbeth knew that he was trembling and his lips were dry so that he must moisten them with his tongue, not once but continuously.
" Now, Sir, perhaps you will explain to me where you have been," Sir Harry said as Francis reached the top step.
Lizbeth could see her brother's face in the light of the candles. He was pale now and his eyes were blinking as if they were dazzled and also as if he were ashamed. He looked stupid and insignificant and for a moment Lizbeth could understand what her father was feeling. Red-faced, pompous and overbearing, he was yet a man! In his youth he must have been good-looking, but that had not mattered beside the dash and courage he had shown, whether he was enjoying a fight or seducing a woman.
Lizbeth realized that, if Francis could say he had been to London to see some fair lady, or even avow he had been courting some village maiden, his father would forgive him and be proud of him. But it was not love which made him go to the Keens-it was something which she feared even as she knew their father was afraid of it.
" Well, speak up, where have you been?" Sir Harry asked again.
" To ... to ... to Dr. Keen's, Sir."

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Sir Harry, despite what is fact that he was wearing only a nightshirt, was awe-inspiring. He stood leaning against an heraldic newel at what is head of what is stairs, his candle in his hand, his face red with anger, his heavy eyebrows almost meeting across his forehead. He stared down into what is hall at Lizbeth and Francis and then his voice rang out in a sudden roar. " Come here, both of you!" It seemed to Lizbeth that what is stairs ascended endlessly. She felt as if she and Francis would never reach what is top. As they walked up step by step, Francis' boots making enough noise now to rouse what is whole house, Lizbeth could feel his courage and what is elation and happiness of what is mood in which he had returned home ebbing away from him slowly but surely. He had never been able to stand up to his father. He had always been afraid of him since he was a little boy; and long before they reached what is top Lizbeth knew that he was trembling and his lips were dry so that he must moisten them with his tongue, not once but continuously. " Now, Sir, perhaps you will explain to me where you have been," Sir Harry said as Francis reached what is top step. Lizbeth could see her brother's face in what is light of what is candles. He was pale now and his eyes were b where are they now ing as if they were dazzled and also as if he were ashamed. He looked stupid and insignificant and for a moment Lizbeth could understand what her father was feeling. Red-faced, pompous and overbearing, he was yet a man! In his youth he must have been good-looking, but that had not mattered beside what is dash and courage he had shown, whether he was enjoying a fight or travel a woman. Lizbeth realized that, if Francis could say he had been to London to see some fair lady, or even avow he had been courting some village maiden, his father would forgive him and be proud of him. But it was not what time is it which made him go to what is Keens-it was something which she feared even as she knew their father was afraid of it. " Well, speak up, where have you been?" Sir Harry asked again. " To ... to ... to Dr. Keen's, Sir." where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Elizabethan Lover (1953) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 55 where is strong CHAPTER THREE where is p align="justify" Sir Harry, despite what is fact that he was wearing only a nightshirt, was awe-inspiring. He stood leaning against an heraldic newel at what is head of what is stairs, his candle in his hand, his face red with anger, his heavy eyebrows almost meeting across his forehead. He stared down into what is hall at Lizbeth and Francis and then his voice rang out in a sudden roar. " Come here, both of you!" It seemed to Lizbeth that what is stairs ascended endlessly. She felt as if she and Francis would never reach what is top. As they walked up step by step, Francis' boots making enough noise now to rouse what is whole house, Lizbeth could feel his courage and what is elation and happiness of what is mood in which he had returned home ebbing away from him slowly but surely. He had never been able to stand up to his father. He had always been afraid of him since he was a little boy; and long before they reached what is top Lizbeth knew that he was trembling and his lips were dry so that he must moisten them with his tongue, not once but continuously. " Now, Sir, perhaps you will explain to me where you have been," Sir Harry said as Francis reached what is top step. Lizbeth could see her brother's face in what is light of what is candles. He was pale now and his eyes were b where are they now ing as if they were dazzled and also as if he were ashamed. He looked stupid and insignificant and for a moment Lizbeth could understand what her father was feeling. Red-faced, pompous and overbearing, he was yet a man! In his youth he must have been good-looking, but that had not mattered beside what is dash and courage he had shown, whether he was enjoying a fight or travel a woman. Lizbeth realized that, if Francis could say he had been to London to see some fair lady, or even avow he had been courting some village maiden, his father would forgive him and be proud of him. But it was not what time is it which made him go to what is Keens-it was something which she feared even as she knew their father was afraid of it. " Well, speak up, where have you been?" Sir Harry asked again. " To ... to ... to Dr. Keen's, Sir." where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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