Books > Old Books > Elizabethan Lover (1953)


Page 52

CHAPTER THREE

"If Father should discover what you are he would kill you-I think," Lizbeth said in a low voice. "Yes, I know that," Phillida replied.
She spoke steadfastly with a strength which Lizbeth had never known she possessed. Then, as they sat there silent, one of the candles spluttered in its wick and went out. Lizbeth remembered Francis.
" I must leave you now so that you will go to sleep," she said to Phillida. "Promise me that you will cry no more."
" No more to-night. Thank you for comforting me, little Lizbeth. I somehow believe that things are not as hopeless as I thought they were earlier to-day. God will help me."
" I pray that He will," Lizbeth answered.
She bent to kiss Phillida, tucked her up and turned towards the door, blowing out the remaining candle.
" Good night," she whispered, her hand on the latch.
" God bless you, Lizbeth," Phillida replied.
Lizbeth crept back to her room. Her thoughts were chaotic and she wondered, as she slipped between the sheets, whether what she had learned was true or whether it had just been a strange dream which had come to her in the night. She could hardly credit that Phillida, the quiet, rather stupid sister of whom she had often felt slightly contemptuous, was really the same Phillida whom she had just left-a woman fraught with emotion, fighting a lone battle for the sake of her Faith.
Religious feelings ran high in the country and there was so much controversy that Lizbeth was content for it to mean little more to her than noisy, fiercely-contested arguments and lengthy, boring services every Sunday in the village church. There in the big family pew, with its high, oak sides screening them from the congregation, her father usually slept while her stepmother read a book. Lizbeth could remember fidgeting endlessly as a child until, as the years passed, she managed to let her mind slip away to some imaginative place of her own so that she did not hear the long, laboured discourse which usually took the best part of two hours.
Yet now she wondered whether religion should have meant more to her. The prayers she had said as a child had seemed adequate enough; yet beside the flame which was driving

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE "If Father should discover what you are he would stop you-I think," Lizbeth said in a low voice. "Yes, I know that," Phillida replied. She spoke steadfastly with a strength which Lizbeth had never known she possessed. Then, as they sat there silent, one of what is candles spluttered in its wick and went out. Lizbeth remembered Francis. " I must leave you now so that you will go to sleep," she said to Phillida. "Promise me that you will cry no more." " No more to-night. Thank you for comforting me, little Lizbeth. I somehow believe that things are not as hopeless as I thought they were earlier to-day. God will help me." " I pray that He will," Lizbeth answered. She bent to kiss Phillida, tucked her up and turned towards what is door, blowing out what is remaining candle. " Good night," she whispered, her hand on what is latch. " God bless you, Lizbeth," Phillida replied. Lizbeth crept back to her room. Her thoughts were chaotic and she wondered, as she slipped between what is sheets, whether what she had learned was true or whether it had just been a strange dream which had come to her in what is night. She could hardly credit that Phillida, what is quiet, rather stupid sister of whom she had often felt slightly contemptuous, was really what is same Phillida whom she had just left-a woman fraught with emotion, fighting a lone battle for what is sake of her Faith. Religious feelings ran high in what is country and there was so much controversy that Lizbeth was content for it to mean little more to her than noisy, fiercely-contested arguments and lengthy, boring services every Sunday in what is village church. There in what is big family pew, with its high, oak sides screening them from what is congregation, her father usually slept while her stepmother read a book. Lizbeth could remember fidgeting endlessly as a child until, as what is years passed, she managed to let her mind slip away to some imaginative place of her own so that she did not hear what is long, laboured discourse which usually took what is best part of two hours. Yet now she wondered whether religion should have meant more to her. what is prayers she had said as a child had seemed adequate enough; yet beside what is flame which was driving where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Elizabethan Lover (1953) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 52 where is strong CHAPTER THREE where is p align="justify" "If Father should discover what you are he would stop you-I think," Lizbeth said in a low voice. "Yes, I know that," Phillida replied. She spoke steadfastly with a strength which Lizbeth had never known she possessed. Then, as they sat there silent, one of what is candles spluttered in its wick and went out. Lizbeth remembered Francis. " I must leave you now so that you will go to sleep," she said to Phillida. "Promise me that you will cry no more." " No more to-night. Thank you for comforting me, little Lizbeth. I somehow believe that things are not as hopeless as I thought they were earlier to-day. God will help me." " I pray that He will," Lizbeth answered. She bent to kiss Phillida, tucked her up and turned towards the door, blowing out what is remaining candle. " Good night," she whispered, her hand on what is latch. " God bless you, Lizbeth," Phillida replied. Lizbeth crept back to her room. Her thoughts were chaotic and she wondered, as she slipped between what is sheets, whether what she had learned was true or whether it had just been a strange dream which had come to her in what is night. She could hardly credit that Phillida, what is quiet, rather stupid sister of whom she had often felt slightly contemptuous, was really what is same Phillida whom she had just left-a woman fraught with emotion, fighting a lone battle for what is sake of her Faith. Religious feelings ran high in what is country and there was so much controversy that Lizbeth was content for it to mean little more to her than noisy, fiercely-contested arguments and lengthy, boring services every Sunday in what is village church. There in what is big family pew, with its high, oak sides screening them from what is congregation, her father usually slept while her stepmother read a book. Lizbeth could remember fidgeting endlessly as a child until, as what is years passed, she managed to let her mind slip away to some imaginative place of her own so that she did not hear what is long, laboured discourse which usually took what is best part of two hours. Yet now she wondered whether religion should have meant more to her. what is prayers she had said as a child had seemed adequate enough; yet beside what is flame which was driving where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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