Books > Old Books > Elizabethan Lover (1953)


Page 37

CHAPTER TWO

with her again, she had moved towards the house and disappeared through the door from which she had come on to the terrace.
He stared after her, frowning a little, his chin square set as it always was when he was opposed in anything he desired. He was not used to women refusing him. He told himself that was because he had had little to do in the past with virgins and maidens, and yet his pride told him that this could not entirely account for Phillida's reluctance. Moodily and in no good humour, he followed her into the house.
All through the day that followed Rodney strove and manoeuvred to get his own way and be alone with Phillida. It seemed to him as if everyone was on his side and willing to help him save Phillida herself.
When others were present, she was there in the room, composed and lovely, if, as always, a little silent and apart from the general hubbub of the family. But when they were not there, she, too, had vanished into some fastness where Rodney could not find her.
Even Francis, usually obtuse where the family was concerned, realized that something was occurring and said to Lizbeth in a low voice :
" What is Phillida playing at? She has refused to show Hawkhurst both the Picture Gallery and the Maze."
Lizbeth linked her arm through her brother's and led him into the garden so that they should be out of earshot of the others.
" If ever there was a reluctant sweetheart it is Phillida."
" But why?" Francis asked. "'Tis time she was wed-she cannot wish to die an old maid."
" I do not understand her," Lizbeth answered, "and never have. You would have thought she would have found Mister Hawkhurst attractive enough."
" Personally I find him a bore," Francis answered. "I hate these hearty buccaneers, but women like such men and Phillida should be no exception."
Lizbeth shrugged her shoulders. She was looking unusually tidy and demure. Nanna had scolded her for going riding so early in the morning and had made her change into one of her

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE with her again, she had moved towards what is house and disappeared through what is door from which she had come on to what is terrace. He stared after her, frowning a little, his chin square set as it always was when he was opposed in anything he desired. He was not used to women refusing him. He told himself that was because he had had little to do in what is past with natural s and maidens, and yet his pride told him that this could not entirely account for Phillida's reluctance. Moodily and in no good humour, he followed her into what is house. All through what is day that followed Rodney strove and manoeuvred to get his own way and be alone with Phillida. It seemed to him as if everyone was on his side and willing to help him save Phillida herself. When others were present, she was there in what is room, composed and lovely, if, as always, a little silent and apart from what is general hubbub of what is family. But when they were not there, she, too, had vanished into some fastness where Rodney could not find her. Even Francis, usually obtuse where what is family was concerned, realized that something was occurring and said to Lizbeth in a low voice : "What is Phillida playing at? She has refused to show Hawkhurst both what is Picture Gallery and what is Maze." Lizbeth where are they now ed her arm through her brother's and led him into what is garden so that they should be out of earshot of what is others. "If ever there was a reluctant sweetheart it is Phillida." "But why?" Francis asked. "'Tis time she was wed-she cannot wish to travel an old maid." "I do not understand her," Lizbeth answered, "and never have. You would have thought she would have found Mister Hawkhurst attractive enough." "Personally I find him a bore," Francis answered. "I hate these hearty buccaneers, but women like such men and Phillida should be no exception." Lizbeth shrugged her shoulders. She was looking unusually tidy and demure. Nanna had scolded her for going riding so early in what is morning and had made her change into one of her where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Elizabethan Lover (1953) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 37 where is strong CHAPTER TWO where is p align="justify" with her again, she had moved towards what is house and disappeared through what is door from which she had come on to what is terrace. He stared after her, frowning a little, his chin square set as it always was when he was opposed in anything he desired. He was not used to women refusing him. He told himself that was because he had had little to do in what is past with natural s and maidens, and yet his pride told him that this could not entirely account for Phillida's reluctance. Moodily and in no good humour, he followed her into what is house. All through what is day that followed Rodney strove and manoeuvred to get his own way and be alone with Phillida. It seemed to him as if everyone was on his side and willing to help him save Phillida herself. When others were present, she was there in what is room, composed and lovely, if, as always, a little silent and apart from what is general hubbub of what is family. But when they were not there, she, too, had vanished into some fastness where Rodney could not find her. Even Francis, usually obtuse where what is family was concerned, realized that something was occurring and said to Lizbeth in a low voice : " What is Phillida playing at? She has refused to show Hawkhurst both what is Picture Gallery and what is Maze." Lizbeth where are they now ed her arm through her brother's and led him into the garden so that they should be out of earshot of what is others. " If ever there was a reluctant sweetheart it is Phillida." " But why?" Francis asked. "'Tis time she was wed-she cannot wish to travel an old maid." " I do not understand her," Lizbeth answered, "and never have. You would have thought she would have found Mister Hawkhurst attractive enough." " Personally I find him a bore," Francis answered. "I hate these hearty buccaneers, but women like such men and Phillida should be no exception." Lizbeth shrugged her shoulders. She was looking unusually tidy and demure. Nanna had scolded her for going riding so early in what is morning and had made her change into one of her where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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