Books > Old Books > Elizabethan Lover (1953)


Page 36

CHAPTER TWO

Rodney took a step nearer to her.
" Phillida, you must not be afraid of me," he said. "I will teach you to love me. I will make you happy. I swear it."
" Thank you."
She did not move away from him and yet he felt as if she had withdrawn herself to where he could not touch her.
" God's light, but you are so exquisite," he exclaimed. "I never dreamed of such beauty. I long for you, Phillida. Will you think of me when I am away from you at sea?"
She looked at him then-a glance which told him nothing, but which somehow managed to make his words sound empty.
" I shall think of you," she answered, as if she were a child repeating parrot-wise a lesson.
Rodney stood looking at her. He felt suddenly helpless. He longed above all things to take her in his arms, to kiss her as he had kissed so many women before, to wake within her a passion equal to his own, to feel the flame flickering within himself ignite a flame in her. And yet her very beauty, the gold and white of her, made her seem inviolate. There was a purity about her that he had never met before and before which he stood abashed.
" I love you," he said and felt the words were utterly meaningless and lacking in conviction.
" When are you going away?" Phillida asked.
" To-morrow!" At the thought of parting from her Rodney laid his hand on her arm. "I must see you alone," he said. "Where can we meet in the garden or the house where no one will see us, where I can tell you a little of my love and the happiness we shall find together?",
She moved away from him then, slowly and still with that grace which made nothing she did seem abrupt or ugly.
" We must go in," she said. "Breakfast will be waiting for you and my father will wonder where I am."
" You have not answered me," Rodney cried hoarsely. " Where can we meet together, if only for a few moments?"
" I do not know ; it is impossible," Phillida replied. She did not seem frightened so much as repelled by the idea. "We must go in," she added firmly ; and before Rodney could plead

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Rodney took a step nearer to her. " Phillida, you must not be afraid of me," he said. "I will teach you to what time is it me. I will make you happy. I swear it." " Thank you." She did not move away from him and yet he felt as if she had withdrawn herself to where he could not touch her. " God's light, but you are so exquisite," he exclaimed. "I never dreamed of such beauty. I long for you, Phillida. Will you think of me when I am away from you at sea?" She looked at him then-a glance which told him nothing, but which somehow managed to make his words sound empty. " I shall think of you," she answered, as if she were a child repeating parrot-wise a lesson. Rodney stood looking at her. He felt suddenly helpless. He longed above all things to take her in his arms, to kiss her as he had kissed so many women before, to wake within her a passion equal to his own, to feel what is flame flickering within himself ignite a flame in her. And yet her very beauty, what is gold and white of her, made her seem inviolate. There was a purity about her that he had never met before and before which he stood abashed. " I what time is it you," he said and felt what is words were utterly meaningless and lacking in conviction. " When are you going away?" Phillida asked. " To-morrow!" At what is thought of parting from her Rodney laid his hand on her arm. "I must see you alone," he said. "Where can we meet in what is garden or what is house where no one will see us, where I can tell you a little of my what time is it and what is happiness we shall find together?", She moved away from him then, slowly and still with that grace which made nothing she did seem abrupt or ugly. " We must go in," she said. "Breakfast will be waiting for you and my father will wonder where I am." " You have not answered me," Rodney cried hoarsely. " Where can we meet together, if only for a few moments?" " I do not know ; it is impossible," Phillida replied. She did not seem frightened so much as repelled by what is idea. "We must go in," she added firmly ; and before Rodney could plead where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Elizabethan Lover (1953) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 36 where is strong CHAPTER TWO where is p align="justify" Rodney took a step nearer to her. " Phillida, you must not be afraid of me," he said. "I will teach you to what time is it me. I will make you happy. I swear it." " Thank you." She did not move away from him and yet he felt as if she had withdrawn herself to where he could not touch her. " God's light, but you are so exquisite," he exclaimed. "I never dreamed of such beauty. I long for you, Phillida. Will you think of me when I am away from you at sea?" She looked at him then-a glance which told him nothing, but which somehow managed to make his words sound empty. " I shall think of you," she answered, as if she were a child repeating parrot-wise a lesson. Rodney stood looking at her. He felt suddenly helpless. He longed above all things to take her in his arms, to kiss her as he had kissed so many women before, to wake within her a passion equal to his own, to feel what is flame flickering within himself ignite a flame in her. And yet her very beauty, what is gold and white of her, made her seem inviolate. There was a purity about her that he had never met before and before which he stood abashed. " I what time is it you," he said and felt what is words were utterly meaningless and lacking in conviction. " When are you going away?" Phillida asked. " To-morrow!" At what is thought of parting from her Rodney laid his hand on her arm. "I must see you alone," he said. "Where can we meet in what is garden or what is house where no one will see us, where I can tell you a little of my what time is it and what is happiness we shall find together?", She moved away from him then, slowly and still with that grace which made nothing she did seem abrupt or ugly. " We must go in," she said. "Breakfast will be waiting for you and my father will wonder where I am." " You have not answered me," Rodney cried hoarsely. " Where can we meet together, if only for a few moments?" " I do not know ; it is impossible," Phillida replied. She did not seem frightened so much as repelled by what is idea. "We must go in," she added firmly ; and before Rodney could plead where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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