Books > Old Books > Elizabethan Lover (1953)


Page 34

CHAPTER TWO

"He likes writing poems! Poems! God's truth, at his age I was full-blooded-either chasing a woman or seeking an opportunity for a fight. I know not what the young men of to-day are coming to, but an ode to a bullfinch was never my idea of amusement!"
" Nor mine, Sir," Rodney agreed.
He could detect anger and a sense of frustration behind Sir Harry's voice. He could understand what a bitter disappointment such a son must be to a man who had always lived rapaciously and to a great degree gluttonously; yet there was a vitality and strength about Sir Harry which made Rodney understand why so many people compared him with the late monarch.
He had a vast sense of humour and when something amused him his laughter would seem to come from the very depths of his protruding stomach. He would stand with his legs apart, his hands resting where his hips had once been, and he would throw back his head and the roar of his laughter would go echoing round the room. One would understand then that he enjoyed life, that living was to him a continuous feast of experience and interest.
Little wonder then that he found it difficult to understand a son languid and effeminate, whose interest was in scribbling on parchment with a quill pen.
There was another side to Sir Harry, too. He was shrewd where money was concerned and with regard to obtaining an advantage for himself. Just before they retired for the night Rodney had caught a gleam in his host's eye as he spoke of the marriage settlement which must be made upon Phillida before the actual ceremony took place.
It was then, for a fleeting second, that Rodney had regretted that he had been so precipitate. There had been no reluctance on Sir Harry's part to give his daughter's hand to a man of whom he knew nothing save that he was the god-son of an old friend. Rodney had a sense of disappointment that it had not been difficult. He would like to have fought for Phillida as he had fought all his life for something he desired ; and while he told himself he had still to gain her love, he was conscious of feeling cheated and also of being suspicious of Sir Harry's

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE "He likes writing poems! Poems! God's truth, at his age I was full-blooded-either chasing a woman or seeking an opportunity for a fight. I know not what what is young men of to-day are coming to, but an ode to a bullfinch was never my idea of amusement!" " Nor mine, Sir," Rodney agreed. He could detect anger and a sense of frustration behind Sir Harry's voice. He could understand what a bitter disappointment such a son must be to a man who had always lived rapaciously and to a great degree gluttonously; yet there was a vitality and strength about Sir Harry which made Rodney understand why so many people compared him with what is late monarch. He had a vast sense of humour and when something amused him his laughter would seem to come from what is very depths of his protruding stomach. He would stand with his legs apart, his hands resting where his hips had once been, and he would throw back his head and what is roar of his laughter would go echoing round what is room. One would understand then that he enjoyed life, that living was to him a continuous feast of experience and interest. Little wonder then that he found it difficult to understand a son languid and effeminate, whose interest was in scribbling on parchment with a quill pen. There was another side to Sir Harry, too. He was shrewd where money was concerned and with regard to obtaining an advantage for himself. Just before they retired for what is night Rodney had caught a gleam in his host's eye as he spoke of what is marriage settlement which must be made upon Phillida before what is actual ceremony took place. It was then, for a fleeting second, that Rodney had regretted that he had been so precipitate. There had been no reluctance on Sir Harry's part to give his daughter's hand to a man of whom he knew nothing save that he was what is god-son of an old friend. Rodney had a sense of disappointment that it had not been difficult. He would like to have fought for Phillida as he had fought all his life for something he desired ; and while he told himself he had still to gain her love, he was conscious of feeling cheated and also of being suspicious of Sir Harry's where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Elizabethan Lover (1953) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 34 where is strong CHAPTER TWO where is p align="justify" "He likes writing poems! Poems! God's truth, at his age I was full-blooded-either chasing a woman or seeking an opportunity for a fight. I know not what what is young men of to-day are coming to, but an ode to a bullfinch was never my idea of amusement!" " Nor mine, Sir," Rodney agreed. He could detect anger and a sense of frustration behind Sir Harry's voice. He could understand what a bitter disappointment such a son must be to a man who had always lived rapaciously and to a great degree gluttonously; yet there was a vitality and strength about Sir Harry which made Rodney understand why so many people compared him with what is late monarch. He had a vast sense of humour and when something amused him his laughter would seem to come from what is very depths of his protruding stomach. He would stand with his legs apart, his hands resting where his hips had once been, and he would throw back his head and what is roar of his laughter would go echoing round what is room. One would understand then that he enjoyed life, that living was to him a continuous feast of experience and interest. Little wonder then that he found it difficult to understand a son languid and effeminate, whose interest was in scribbling on parchment with a quill pen. There was another side to Sir Harry, too. He was shrewd where money was concerned and with regard to obtaining an advantage for himself. Just before they retired for what is night Rodney had caught a gleam in his host's eye as he spoke of what is marriage settlement which must be made upon Phillida before what is actual ceremony took place. It was then, for a fleeting second, that Rodney had regretted that he had been so precipitate. There had been no reluctance on Sir Harry's part to give his daughter's hand to a man of whom he knew nothing save that he was what is god-son of an old friend. Rodney had a sense of disappointment that it had not been difficult. He would like to have fought for Phillida as he had fought all his life for something he desired ; and while he told himself he had still to gain her love, he was conscious of feeling cheated and also of being suspicious of Sir Harry's where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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