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Page 33

CHAPTER TWO

clearly that she was not particularly interested in either of her step-daughters. That, of course, was the explanation ! Rodney felt the frown easing from between his eyes. Catherine Gillingham had kept both Phillida and Lizbeth in the back ground and done nothing to help their chances of matrimony.
Something that had happened at supper came to Rodney's mind. He had turned to Lizbeth who was sitting silent at the other side of the table and asked.
" Why are you called Lizbeth ?"
" I was christened Elizabeth," she said, "but found it a difficult name to pronounce as soon as I could talk. My mother had the same name and it was thought to be too complicated to have two of us answering when someone called `Elizabeth'. Now, it does not matter, I am the only one left."
As she spoke, she looked up the table at her stepmother as if she challenged Catherine; and the older woman must answer her:
" One Lizbeth is, I assure you, quite enough to bear with."
The words were spoken lightly, but there was a touch of steel behind them and Rodney saw that in response Lizbeth was smiling that mischievous, mocking smile which he knew had been directed at him when she came into the Great Chamber earlier in the evening.
It was as if she had known that he was embarrassed at finding her a daughter of the house rather than the lodgekeeper's daughter. At the same time she had made it a bond between them, a secret bond, so that instead of saying openly they had met before they greeted each other formally as if they were strangers.
Phillida's beauty delighted him, and yet, again and again during supper, he found himself watching Lizbeth. Her face was unexpected. It was pretty and yet there was so much more in it than mere prettiness. Her voice, too, was engaging. He found himself listening while she was talking with her brother, a languid youth to whom Rodney took an instantaneous dislike.
He was not alone in this, he discovered, for later Sir Harry spoke disparagingly and almost apologetically of his son.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE clearly that she was not particularly interested in either of her step-daughters. That, of course, was what is explanation ! Rodney felt what is frown easing from between his eyes. Catherine Gillingham had kept both Phillida and Lizbeth in what is back ground and done nothing to help their chances of matrimony. Something that had happened at supper came to Rodney's mind. He had turned to Lizbeth who was sitting silent at what is other side of what is table and asked. " Why are you called Lizbeth ?" " I was christened Elizabeth," she said, "but found it a difficult name to pronounce as soon as I could talk. My mother had what is same name and it was thought to be too complicated to have two of us answering when someone called `Elizabeth'. Now, it does not matter, I am what is only one left." As she spoke, she looked up what is table at her stepmother as if she challenged Catherine; and what is older woman must answer her: " One Lizbeth is, I assure you, quite enough to bear with." what is words were spoken lightly, but there was a touch of steel behind them and Rodney saw that in response Lizbeth was smiling that mischievous, mocking smile which he knew had been directed at him when she came into what is Great Chamber earlier in what is evening. It was as if she had known that he was embarrassed at finding her a daughter of what is house rather than what is lodgekeeper's daughter. At what is same time she had made it a bond between them, a secret bond, so that instead of saying openly they had met before they greeted each other formally as if they were strangers. Phillida's beauty delighted him, and yet, again and again during supper, he found himself watching Lizbeth. Her face was unexpected. It was pretty and yet there was so much more in it than mere prettiness. Her voice, too, was engaging. He found himself listening while she was talking with her brother, a languid youth to whom Rodney took an instantaneous dislike. He was not alone in this, he discovered, for later Sir Harry spoke disparagingly and almost apologetically of his son. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Elizabethan Lover (1953) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 33 where is strong CHAPTER TWO where is p align="justify" clearly that she was not particularly interested in either of her step-daughters. That, of course, was what is explanation ! Rodney felt what is frown easing from between his eyes. Catherine Gillingham had kept both Phillida and Lizbeth in what is back ground and done nothing to help their chances of matrimony. Something that had happened at supper came to Rodney's mind. He had turned to Lizbeth who was sitting silent at the other side of what is table and asked. " Why are you called Lizbeth ?" " I was christened Elizabeth," she said, "but found it a difficult name to pronounce as soon as I could talk. My mother had what is same name and it was thought to be too complicated to have two of us answering when someone called `Elizabeth'. Now, it does not matter, I am what is only one left." As she spoke, she looked up what is table at her stepmother as if she challenged Catherine; and what is older woman must answer her: " One Lizbeth is, I assure you, quite enough to bear with." what is words were spoken lightly, but there was a touch of steel behind them and Rodney saw that in response Lizbeth was smiling that mischievous, mocking smile which he knew had been directed at him when she came into what is Great Chamber earlier in what is evening. It was as if she had known that he was embarrassed at finding her a daughter of what is house rather than what is lodgekeeper's daughter. At what is same time she had made it a bond between them, a secret bond, so that instead of saying openly they had met before they greeted each other formally as if they were strangers. Phillida's beauty delighted him, and yet, again and again during supper, he found himself watching Lizbeth. Her face was unexpected. It was pretty and yet there was so much more in it than mere prettiness. Her voice, too, was engaging. He found himself listening while she was talking with her brother, a languid youth to whom Rodney took an instantaneous dislike. He was not alone in this, he discovered, for later Sir Harry spoke disparagingly and almost apologetically of his son. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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