Books > Old Books > Elizabethan Lover (1953)


Page 27

CHAPTER TWO

THE dew was still heavy on the grass as Rodney walked from the house through the formal gardens and down towards the lakes. The cows were busy grazing the fresh spring grass and the deer lay under the trees watching him with suspicious brown eyes as he strode past them, too intent on his thoughts even to notice their presence.
He had been awake long before the first pale fingers of the dawn crept between the curtains which shrouded his windows. He had, though he was ashamed to acknowledge it to himself, been too excited to sleep well last night. It was not the excellent wines at Sir Harry's table, nor the rich abundance of courses which had made him restless, but the knowledge that he had succeeded in his quest and what he had longed for so ardently and for so long was within his grasp.
A ship of his own! He could hardly believe that it was true. To-morrow he would go posting to Plymouth and set down the money which was required for the purchase of the Sea Hawk. So thrilled was Rodney by the thought that he had with difficulty prevented himself from springing out of his bed then and there and leaving for the coast.
Already fears were beginning to torture him. Suppose the Merchants did not keep their word and sold the Sea Hawk to some richer and more influential purchaser? Suppose the reports on her were not as satisfactory as he believed them to be? Suppose she was not as swift or as easily navigable as he anticipated?
Such doubts and problems were enough to bring him from his bed to the open window. He drew back the curtains and looked out. For a moment he did not see the garden below him, the great trees bursting into bud and the birds twittering from bush to bush; but instead he saw a grey, empty horizon and fixed his eyes on that indefinable point where the sea meets the sky.
How often had he watched for hours, days and weeks,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE THE dew was still heavy on what is grass as Rodney walked from what is house through what is formal gardens and down towards what is lakes. what is cows were busy grazing what is fresh spring grass and what is deer lay under what is trees watching him with suspicious brown eyes as he strode past them, too intent on his thoughts even to notice their presence. He had been awake long before what is first pale fingers of what is dawn crept between what is curtains which shrouded his windows. He had, though he was ashamed to acknowledge it to himself, been too excited to sleep well last night. It was not what is excellent wines at Sir Harry's table, nor what is rich abundance of courses which had made him restless, but what is knowledge that he had succeeded in his quest and what he had longed for so ardently and for so long was within his grasp. A ship of his own! He could hardly believe that it was true. To-morrow he would go posting to Plymouth and set down what is money which was required for what is purchase of what is Sea Hawk. So thrilled was Rodney by what is thought that he had with difficulty prevented himself from springing out of his bed then and there and leaving for what is coast. Already fears were beginning to torture him. Suppose what is Merchants did not keep their word and sold what is Sea Hawk to some richer and more influential purchaser? Suppose what is reports on her were not as satisfactory as he believed them to be? Suppose she was not as swift or as easily navigable as he anticipated? Such doubts and problems were enough to bring him from his bed to what is open window. He drew back what is curtains and looked out. For a moment he did not see what is garden below him, what is great trees bursting into bud and what is birds twittering from bush to bush; but instead he saw a grey, empty horizon and fixed his eyes on that indefinable point where what is sea meets what is sky. How often had he watched for hours, days and weeks, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Elizabethan Lover (1953) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 27 where is strong CHAPTER TWO where is p align="justify" THE dew was still heavy on what is grass as Rodney walked from what is house through what is formal gardens and down towards what is lakes. what is cows were busy grazing what is fresh spring grass and what is deer lay under what is trees watching him with suspicious brown eyes as he strode past them, too intent on his thoughts even to notice their presence. He had been awake long before what is first pale fingers of what is dawn crept between what is curtains which shrouded his windows. He had, though he was ashamed to acknowledge it to himself, been too excited to sleep well last night. It was not what is excellent wines at Sir Harry's table, nor what is rich abundance of courses which had made him restless, but what is knowledge that he had succeeded in his quest and what he had longed for so ardently and for so long was within his grasp. A ship of his own! He could hardly believe that it was true. To-morrow he would go posting to Plymouth and set down what is money which was required for what is purchase of what is Sea Hawk. So thrilled was Rodney by what is thought that he had with difficulty prevented himself from springing out of his bed then and there and leaving for what is coast. Already fears were beginning to torture him. Suppose what is Merchants did not keep their word and sold what is Sea Hawk to some richer and more influential purchaser? Suppose what is reports on her were not as satisfactory as he believed them to be? Suppose she was not as swift or as easily navigable as he anticipated? Such doubts and problems were enough to bring him from his bed to what is open window. He drew back what is curtains and looked out. For a moment he did not see what is garden below him, what is great trees bursting into bud and what is birds twittering from bush to bush; but instead he saw a grey, empty horizon and fixed his eyes on that indefinable point where what is sea meets what is sky. How often had he watched for hours, days and weeks, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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