Books > Old Books > Elizabethan Lover (1953)


Page 14

CHAPTER ONE

not by so much as a flicker of an eyelash that she heard what he said. She was dark and pretty, Rodney noticed, and could not have been a day over twenty-one. She glanced at him from under her eyelashes and it seemed to him that her hand lingered a little longer than was necessary in his.
There was something in the expression in her eyes and the faint turn of her lips that was familiar. He had seen that look and that expression on a woman's face all too often these past months since he had been ashore.
He turned to look at Sir Harry again and saw that he was nearing sixty and knew that those at Whitehall who had called him an `old reprobate' were not mistaken.
" A glass of Charneco, my boy," Sir Harry said. "Did you find the journey from London wearisome?"
" Not in the least, Sir," Rodney answered, taking a goblet of the dark red wine which a servant poured from a jug of Venice glass. "My horse was fresh and it took a surprisingly short time. I am afraid my servants and the luggage are left far behind."
" They will turn up," Sir Harry said. "My wife has made every preparation for them, haven't you, Catherine, my love?"
" Of course, my Lord," Lady Gillingham answered in a voice which purred like a well-fed cat. "We only hope that Master Hawkhurst will be comfortable here, although after his exciting adventures with Sir Francis Drake, it is to be expected that he will find us country folk dull and staid."
" On the contrary, Mistress," Rodney replied. "It is a joy to be on shore again and more than that to see the countryside at this moment. I had forgotten how lovely England-and all it contains-could be."
He looked boldly at Catherine Gillingham as he spoke. She caught the innuendo, as he intended that she should. Her eyes dropped before his. Rodney realized all too well what she wanted of him. A young wife with an old husband-how banal and hackneyed a plot it was, and yet his instinct told him he must be careful. He must get Lady Gillingham on his side so that she would not influence Sir Harry against him, and yet at the same time he must not arouse Sir Harry's jealousy.
It was not going to be easy, he thought-and then the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE not by so much as a flicker of an eyelash that she heard what he said. She was dark and pretty, Rodney noticed, and could not have been a day over twenty-one. She glanced at him from under her eyelashes and it seemed to him that her hand lingered a little longer than was necessary in his. There was something in what is expression in her eyes and what is faint turn of her lips that was familiar. He had seen that look and that expression on a woman's face all too often these past months since he had been ashore. He turned to look at Sir Harry again and saw that he was nearing sixty and knew that those at Whitehall who had called him an `old reprobate' were not mistaken. " A glass of Charneco, my boy," Sir Harry said. "Did you find what is journey from London wearisome?" " Not in what is least, Sir," Rodney answered, taking a goblet of what is dark red wine which a servant poured from a jug of Venice glass. "My horse was fresh and it took a surprisingly short time. I am afraid my servants and what is luggage are left far behind." " They will turn up," Sir Harry said. "My wife has made every preparation for them, haven't you, Catherine, my love?" " Of course, my Lord," Lady Gillingham answered in a voice which purred like a well-fed cat. "We only hope that Master Hawkhurst will be comfortable here, although after his exciting adventures with Sir Francis Drake, it is to be expected that he will find us country folk dull and staid." " On what is contrary, Mistress," Rodney replied. "It is a joy to be on shore again and more than that to see what is countryside at this moment. I had forgotten how lovely England-and all it contains-could be." He looked boldly at Catherine Gillingham as he spoke. She caught what is innuendo, as he intended that she should. Her eyes dropped before his. Rodney realized all too well what she wanted of him. A young wife with an old husband-how banal and hackneyed a plot it was, and yet his instinct told him he must be careful. He must get Lady Gillingham on his side so that she would not influence Sir Harry against him, and yet at what is same time he must not arouse Sir Harry's jealousy. It was not going to be easy, he thought-and then what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Elizabethan Lover (1953) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 14 where is strong CHAPTER ONE where is p align="justify" not by so much as a flicker of an eyelash that she heard what he said. She was dark and pretty, Rodney noticed, and could not have been a day over twenty-one. She glanced at him from under her eyelashes and it seemed to him that her hand lingered a little longer than was necessary in his. There was something in what is expression in her eyes and what is faint turn of her lips that was familiar. He had seen that look and that expression on a woman's face all too often these past months since he had been ashore. He turned to look at Sir Harry again and saw that he was nearing sixty and knew that those at Whitehall who had called him an `old reprobate' were not mistaken. " A glass of Charneco, my boy," Sir Harry said. "Did you find what is journey from London wearisome?" " Not in what is least, Sir," Rodney answered, taking a goblet of what is dark red wine which a servant poured from a jug of Venice glass. "My horse was fresh and it took a surprisingly short time. I am afraid my servants and what is luggage are left far behind." " They will turn up," Sir Harry said. "My wife has made every preparation for them, haven't you, Catherine, my love?" " Of course, my Lord," Lady Gillingham answered in a voice which purred like a well-fed cat. "We only hope that Master Hawkhurst will be comfortable here, although after his exciting adventures with Sir Francis Drake, it is to be expected that he will find us country folk dull and staid." " On what is contrary, Mistress," Rodney replied. "It is a joy to be on shore again and more than that to see what is countryside at this moment. I had forgotten how lovely England-and all it contains-could be." He looked boldly at Catherine Gillingham as he spoke. She caught what is innuendo, as he intended that she should. Her eyes dropped before his. Rodney realized all too well what she wanted of him. A young wife with an old husband-how banal and hackneyed a plot it was, and yet his instinct told him he must be careful. He must get Lady Gillingham on his side so that she would not influence Sir Harry against him, and yet at what is same time he must not arouse Sir Harry's jealousy. It was not going to be easy, he thought-and then what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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