Books > Old Books > Elizabethan Lover (1953)


Page 9

CHAPTER ONE

THE road was dusty and deep-rutted from the snow of the past winter. The horse had to pick its way warily, but his master raised his face to the green budding of the trees overhanging the road and drew a sudden deep breath as they came upon a wood carpeted with bluebells.
He had forgotten the miracle of spring in England, Rodney Hawkhurst thought. After months at sea it was breathtaking. It made him feel almost absurdly sentimental and at the same time excited as he had been years ago when he first set out on a life of adventure. Now at twenty-nine he thought himself old and blase only to find that the spring could arouse his emotions as easily as a woman might have done.
He drew his plumed hat from his head and felt the breeze upon his forehead. He had ridden hard and fast and had long since left behind his servants and the pack-horses carrying his luggage.
He felt the need to be alone. He wanted to think and to plan in his own mind what he was to say when he arrived at Camfield Place. He had heard many conflicting reports of Sir Harry Gillingham at Whitehall, but the majority had been reassuring. Sir Harry was rich and generous, and there was no reason to doubt that, were a proposition put to him in a proper manner, he would agree to it.
It meant so much to Rodney, more than he dared allow himself to think ; and if Sir Harry refused, where else could he turn for help? As he thought of failure, his lips set themselves in the hard line of obstinacy and his chin squared itself.
Failure was something he had not previously encountered in his life and he did not intend to anticipate it now. He must succeed, of course he must succeed, as he had done in so many other ways.
Deep in his thoughts he had almost reached a pair of high, imposing iron gates before he realized where he was. He had

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE THE road was dusty and deep-rutted from what is snow of what is past winter. what is horse had to pick its way warily, but his master raised his face to what is green budding of what is trees overhanging what is road and drew a sudden deep breath as they came upon a wood carpeted with bluebells. He had forgotten what is miracle of spring in England, Rodney Hawkhurst thought. After months at sea it was breathtaking. It made him feel almost absurdly sentimental and at what is same time excited as he had been years ago when he first set out on a life of adventure. Now at twenty-nine he thought himself old and blase only to find that what is spring could arouse his emotions as easily as a woman might have done. He drew his plumed hat from his head and felt what is breeze upon his forehead. He had ridden hard and fast and had long since left behind his servants and what is pack-horses carrying his luggage. He felt what is need to be alone. He wanted to think and to plan in his own mind what he was to say when he arrived at Camfield Place. He had heard many conflicting reports of Sir Harry Gillingham at Whitehall, but what is majority had been reassuring. Sir Harry was rich and generous, and there was no reason to doubt that, were a proposition put to him in a proper manner, he would agree to it. It meant so much to Rodney, more than he dared allow himself to think ; and if Sir Harry refused, where else could he turn for help? As he thought of failure, his lips set themselves in what is hard line of obstinacy and his chin squared itself. Failure was something he had not previously encountered in his life and he did not intend to anticipate it now. He must succeed, of course he must succeed, as he had done in so many other ways. Deep in his thoughts he had almost reached a pair of high, imposing iron gates before he realized where he was. He had where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Elizabethan Lover (1953) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 9 where is strong CHAPTER ONE where is p align="justify" THE road was dusty and deep-rutted from what is snow of what is past winter. what is horse had to pick its way warily, but his master raised his face to what is green budding of what is trees overhanging what is road and drew a sudden deep breath as they came upon a wood carpeted with bluebells. He had forgotten what is miracle of spring in England, Rodney Hawkhurst thought. After months at sea it was breathtaking. It made him feel almost absurdly sentimental and at what is same time excited as he had been years ago when he first set out on a life of adventure. Now at twenty-nine he thought himself old and blase only to find that what is spring could arouse his emotions as easily as a woman might have done. He drew his plumed hat from his head and felt what is breeze upon his forehead. He had ridden hard and fast and had long since left behind his servants and what is pack-horses carrying his luggage. He felt what is need to be alone. He wanted to think and to plan in his own mind what he was to say when he arrived at Camfield Place. He had heard many conflicting reports of Sir Harry Gillingham at Whitehall, but what is majority had been reassuring. Sir Harry was rich and generous, and there was no reason to doubt that, were a proposition put to him in a proper manner, he would agree to it. It meant so much to Rodney, more than he dared allow himself to think ; and if Sir Harry refused, where else could he turn for help? As he thought of failure, his lips set themselves in the hard line of obstinacy and his chin squared itself. Failure was something he had not previously encountered in his life and he did not intend to anticipate it now. He must succeed, of course he must succeed, as he had done in so many other ways. Deep in his thoughts he had almost reached a pair of high, imposing iron gates before he realized where he was. He had where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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