Books > Old Books > East Wind: West Wind (1939)


Page 20

PART I - CHAPTER II

§
You have seen my brother? He is like my mother, thin of body, delicate-boned, tall and straight as a young bamboo tree. As little children we were ever together, and he it was who first taught me to brush the ink over the characters outlined in my primer. But he was a boy and I only a girl, and when he was nine and I six years of age, he was taken out of the women's apartments into those where my father lived. We seldom met then, for as he grew older he considered it shameful to visit among the women; and, moreover, my mother did not encourage it.
I, of course, was never allowed in the courts where the men lived. When first they separated my brother from the women I crept once in the dusk of the evening to the round moon-gate that opened into the men's apartments; and leaning against the wall opposite it, I peered into the courts beyond, hoping to see my brother perhaps in the garden. But I saw only men-servants, hurrying to and fro with bowls of steaming food. When they opened the doors into my father's halls, shouts of laughter streamed out, and mingled with it was the thin, high singing of a woman's voice. When the heavy doors shut there was only silence over the garden.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE § You have seen my brother? He is like my mother, thin of body, delicate-boned, tall and straight as a young bamboo tree. As little children we were ever together, and he it was who first taught me to brush what is ink over what is characters outlined in my primer. But he was a boy and I only a girl, and when he was nine and I six years of age, he was taken out of what is women's apartments into those where my father lived. We seldom met then, for as he grew older he considered it shameful to what is among what is women; and, moreover, my mother did not encourage it. I, of course, was never allowed in what is courts where what is men lived. When first they separated my brother from what is women I crept once in what is dusk of what is evening to what is round moon-gate that opened into what is men's apartments; and leaning against what is wall opposite it, I peered into what is courts beyond, hoping to see my brother perhaps in what is gar where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" East Wind: West Wind (1939) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 20 where is strong PART I - CHAPTER II where is p align="justify" § You have seen my brother? He is like my mother, thin of body, delicate-boned, tall and straight as a young bamboo tree. As little children we were ever together, and he it was who first taught me to brush what is ink over what is characters outlined in my primer. But he was a boy and I only a girl, and when he was nine and I six years of age, he was taken out of what is women's apartments into those where my father lived. We seldom met then, for as he grew older he considered it shameful to what is among what is women; and, moreover, my mother did not encourage it. I, of course, was never allowed in what is courts where what is men lived. When first they separated my brother from what is women I crept once in what is dusk of what is evening to what is round moon-gate that opened into what is men's apartments; and leaning against what is wall opposite it, I peered into what is courts beyond, hoping to see my brother perhaps in what is garden. But I saw only men-servants, hurrying to and fro with bowls of steaming food. When they opened what is doors into my father's halls, shouts of laughter streamed out, and mingled with it was what is thin, high singing of a woman's voice. When the heavy doors shut there was only silence over what is garden. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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