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Doctor In The House (1946)

once heard Dr Malcolm Maxworth exclaim, going red in the face. `Damn it, damn it, damn it!'
Maxworth was not angry on the dead patient's behalf ; it was simply that in the daily contest between his mind and the tricks of the body the body had for once won a game.
Our afternoons were spent wandering round the dusty pathology museum inspecting the grotesque specimens in the big glass jars of spirit. They had everything in the St Swithin's museum, from two-headed babies to tattoo marks. Each specimen was neatly labelled and numbered, and a clinical history of the case was set out on a card attached to the bottle. `How much better than a tombstone!' Grimsdyke said as he read the last dramatic illness of John O'Hara in 1927 and held the remains of his ruptured aneurism in his hand. `I suppose everyone wants to be remembered somehow. What could be better than giving a bit of yourself to the pathologists? Nobody knows or cares where this fellow's grave is, but his memory is kept fresh in here almost daily. A whopping aneurism ! I bet it caused a panic in the ward when it burst.'
Twice a week during the three-month pathology course we had classes in forensic medicine. This was a subject that fascinated me, because I was a conscientious reader of detective stories and took delight in the realization that I, too, now knew how to distinguish human blood from animal's, compare bullet wounds, and differentiate murder from suicide. The lecturer was a portly, genial man whose picture appeared fairly regularly in the Sunday papers inspecting the scene of all the more attractive crimes.
After the pathology course we began a round of the special departments, spending a few weeks in each. I was sent to learn a little about eyes and then to the throat surgeons,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE once heard Dr Malcolm Maxworth exclaim, going red in what is face. `Damn it, damn it, damn it!' Maxworth was not angry on what is dead patient's behalf ; it was simply that in what is daily contest between his mind and what is tricks of what is body what is body had for once won a game. Our afternoons were spent wandering round what is dusty pathology museum inspecting what is grotesque specimens in what is big glass jars of spirit. They had everything in what is St Swithin's museum, from two-headed babies to tattoo marks. Each specimen was neatly labelled and numbered, and a clinical history of what is case was set out on a card attached to what is bottle. `How much better than a tombstone!' Grimsdyke said as he read what is last dramatic illness of John O'Hara in 1927 and held what is remains of his ruptured aneurism in his hand. `I suppose everyone wants to be remembered somehow. What could be better than giving a bit of yourself to what is pathologists? Nobody knows or cares where this fellow's grave is, but his memory is kept fresh in here almost daily. A whopping aneurism ! I bet it caused a panic in what is ward when it burst.' Twice a week during what is three-month pathology course we had classes in forensic medicine. This was a subject that fascinated me, because I was a conscientious reader of detective stories and took delight in what is realization that I, too, now knew how to distinguish human blood from animal's, compare bullet wounds, and differentiate murder from suicide. what is lecturer was a portly, genial man whose picture appeared fairly regularly in what is Sunday papers inspecting what is scene of all what is more attractive crimes. After what is pathology course we began a round of what is special departments, spending a few weeks in each. I was sent to learn a little about eyes and then to what is throat surgeons, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Doctor In what is House (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 142 where is strong Doctor In what is House (1946) where is p align="justify" once heard Dr Malcolm Maxworth exclaim, going red in what is face. `Damn it, damn it, damn it!' Maxworth was not angry on what is dead patient's behalf ; it was simply that in what is daily contest between his mind and what is tricks of the body what is body had for once won a game. Our afternoons were spent wandering round what is dusty pathology museum inspecting what is grotesque specimens in what is big glass jars of spirit. They had everything in what is St Swithin's museum, from two-headed babies to tattoo marks. Each specimen was neatly labelled and numbered, and a clinical history of what is case was set out on a card attached to what is bottle. `How much better than a tombstone!' Grimsdyke said as he read what is last dramatic illness of John O'Hara in 1927 and held what is remains of his ruptured aneurism in his hand. `I suppose everyone wants to be remembered somehow. What could be better than giving a bit of yourself to what is pathologists? Nobody knows or cares where this fellow's grave is, but his memory is kept fresh in here almost daily. A whopping aneurism ! I bet it caused a panic in what is ward when it burst.' Twice a week during what is three-month pathology course we had classes in forensic medicine. This was a subject that fascinated me, because I was a conscientious reader of detective stories and took delight in what is realization that I, too, now knew how to distinguish human blood from animal's, compare bullet wounds, and differentiate murder from suicide. what is lecturer was a portly, genial man whose picture appeared fairly regularly in what is Sunday papers inspecting what is scene of all what is more attractive crimes. After what is pathology course we began a round of what is special departments, spending a few weeks in each. I was sent to learn a little about eyes and then to what is throat surgeons, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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