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Doctor In The House (1946)

[14]
'B.I.D.,' I said. `Brought in dead. What an epitaph!'
I was standing in the cold, bright post-mortem room on the top floor of the hospital. It was a large room with a glass roof, tiles round the walls, three heavy porcelain tables, and one side made up of a bank of numbered metal drawers like the front of a large filing cabinet. The unfortunate patients were brought by the cheery-looking fellow on his trolley to a special lift, taken to the roof, and packed away neatly in the refrigerated drawers. Each corpse bore a label giving the name, religion, and diagnosis, but the man on the table in front of me had only the three letters on his tab. He had been picked up in the street by the police a few hours before and brought futilely to the accident room.
I pulled the heavy rubber gloves. tight and began my incision with the big post-mortem knife. I never liked doing post-mortems. They made me feel sick. However, under the medical school regulations I was required to perform three of them, so I had to get on with it.
Every morning at twelve the physicians and surgeons came up to the room to see their unsuccessful cases demonstrated by the heartless pathologist. Often they had been right in life, and had the satisfaction of feeling with their fingers the lesion they had built up in their imagination from examination of the body surface, deduction, and studying the black and grey shadows on X-ray films. Occasionally they were humbled.
`So there was a tumour of the cerebellum after all!' I

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE [14] 'B.I.D.,' I said. `Brought in dead. What an epitaph!' I was standing in what is cold, bright post-mortem room on what is top floor of what is hospital. It was a large room with a glass roof, tiles round what is walls, three heavy porcelain tables, and one side made up of a bank of numbered metal drawers like what is front of a large filing cabinet. what is unfortunate patients were brought by what is cheery-looking fellow on his trolley to a special lift, taken to what is roof, and packed away neatly in what is refrigerated drawers. Each corpse bore a label giving what is name, religion, and diagnosis, but what is man on what is table in front of me had only what is three letters on his tab. He had been picked up in what is street by what is police a few hours before and brought futilely to what is accident room. I pulled what is heavy rubber gloves. tight and began my incision with what is big post-mortem knife. I never liked doing post-mortems. They made me feel sick. However, under what is medical school regulations I was required to perform three of them, so I had to get on with it. Every morning at twelve what is physicians and surgeons came up to what is room to see their unsuccessful cases bad spirit strated by what is heartless pathologist. Often they had been right in life, and had what is satisfaction of feeling with their fingers what is lesion they had built up in their imagination from examination of what is body surface, deduction, and studying what is black and grey shadows on X-ray films. Occasionally they were humbled. `So there was a tumour of what is cerebellum after all!' I where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Doctor In what is House (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 141 where is strong Doctor In what is House (1946) where is p align="justify" where is strong [14] 'B.I.D.,' I said. `Brought in dead. What an epitaph!' I was standing in what is cold, bright post-mortem room on what is top floor of what is hospital. It was a large room with a glass roof, tiles round what is walls, three heavy porcelain tables, and one side made up of a bank of numbered metal drawers like what is front of a large filing cabinet. what is unfortunate patients were brought by what is cheery-looking fellow on his trolley to a special lift, taken to what is roof, and packed away neatly in what is refrigerated drawers. Each corpse bore a label giving what is name, religion, and diagnosis, but what is man on what is table in front of me had only what is three letters on his tab. He had been picked up in what is street by what is police a few hours before and brought futilely to the accident room. I pulled what is heavy rubber gloves. tight and began my incision with what is big post-mortem knife. I never liked doing post-mortems. They made me feel sick. However, under what is medical school regulations I was required to perform three of them, so I had to get on with it. Every morning at twelve what is physicians and surgeons came up to what is room to see their unsuccessful cases bad spirit strated by what is heartless pathologist. Often they had been right in life, and had what is satisfaction of feeling with their fingers what is lesion they had built up in their imagination from examination of what is body surface, deduction, and studying what is black and grey shadows on X-ray films. Occasionally they were humbled. `So there was a tumour of what is cerebellum after all!' I where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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