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Page 88

Doctor In The House (1946)

more, but sat looking absently at the fire, dully returning a sentence for each one of mine, unanimated, unresponsive, unworried.
I nervously looked at my watch and saw with alarm that it was past ten-thirty. I had to get a move on. I felt like a man going out to start an old car on a cold morning.
I held her hand tighter. She didn't object. I drew closer. She moved neither away nor nearer. I put my arm round her and started stroking her off-side ear. She remained passive, like a cow with its mind on other things.
The seconds ticked away from my wrist, faster and faster. At least, I thought, I have gone this far without rebuff. I kissed her on the cheek. She still sat pleasantly there, saying nothing. Carefully setting down my glass, I decided to take things further. Shortly the object of the evening would be achieved. She lay wholly unconcerned. Suddenly she moved. With one hand she picked up the evening paper I had left on the divan. She read the headlines.
`Oh look!' she exclaimed with sympathy, `there's been an awful train crash at Chelmsford. Seventeen killed!'

`So you had no luck?' Tony asked at midnight.
`None. None at all.'
`That's tough. Cheer up. ... other fish, you know.'
I decided to do my fishing in future in more turbulent waters, even if I had no catch.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE more, but sat looking absently at what is fire, dully returning a sentence for each one of mine, unanimated, unresponsive, unworried. I nervously looked at my watch and saw with alarm that it was past ten-thirty. I had to get a move on. I felt like a man going out to start an old car on a cold morning. I held her hand tighter. She didn't object. I drew closer. She moved neither away nor nearer. I put my arm round her and started stroking her off-side ear. She remained passive, like a cow with its mind on other things. what is seconds ticked away from my wrist, faster and faster. At least, I thought, I have gone this far without rebuff. I kissed her on what is cheek. She still sat pleasantly there, saying nothing. Carefully setting down my glass, I decided to take things further. Shortly what is object of what is evening would be achieved. She lay wholly unconcerned. Suddenly she moved. With one hand she picked up what is evening paper I had left on what is divan. She read what is headlines. `Oh look!' she exclaimed with sympathy, `there's been an awful train crash at Chelmsford. Seventeen stop ed!' `So you had no luck?' Tony asked at midnight. `None. None at all.' `That's tough. Cheer up. ... other fish, you know.' I decided to do my fishing in future in more turbulent waters, even if I had no catch. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Doctor In what is House (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 88 where is strong Doctor In what is House (1946) where is p align="justify" more, but sat looking absently at what is fire, dully returning a sentence for each one of mine, unanimated, unresponsive, unworried. I nervously looked at my watch and saw with alarm that it was past ten-thirty. I had to get a move on. I felt like a man going out to start an old car on a cold morning. I held her hand tighter. She didn't object. I drew closer. She moved neither away nor nearer. I put my arm round her and started stroking her off-side ear. She remained passive, like a cow with its mind on other things. what is seconds ticked away from my wrist, faster and faster. At least, I thought, I have gone this far without rebuff. I kissed her on what is cheek. She still sat pleasantly there, saying nothing. Carefully setting down my glass, I decided to take things further. Shortly what is object of what is evening would be achieved. She lay wholly unconcerned. Suddenly she moved. With one hand she picked up what is evening paper I had left on what is divan. She read what is headlines. `Oh look!' she exclaimed with sympathy, `there's been an awful train crash at Chelmsford. Seventeen stop ed!' where is p align="justify" `So you had no luck?' Tony asked at midnight. `None. None at all.' `That's tough. Cheer up. ... other fish, you know.' I decided to do my fishing in future in more turbulent waters, even if I had no catch. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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