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Page 75

Doctor In The House (1946)

have ... what's that? Yes, subcutaneous fat. Then, gentlemen, we first encounter the surgeon's worst enemy.' He glared at us all in turn. `What?' he demanded in general. There was no reply. 'Blood!' he thundered.
At that point the patient restored his personality to the notice of his doctors by vomitting.

Surgery was Sir Lancelot's life and St Swithin's was his home. He had given more of his time for nothing to the hospital than he ever used to make his fortune. He was president or vice-president of almost every students' club and supported the rugby team from the touchline in winter with the same roar he used on ignorant dressers in the theatre. During the war he slept every night at the hospital in the bombing, and operated on casualties in an improvised theatre in the basement as long as they came in. A team of students lived in as well and he used to play cards with them or share a pint of beer, actions which at first caused as much dismay as if he had arrived to operate in his underpants. One night St Swithin's was hit while he was operating. The theatre rocked, the lights went out, and part of the ceiling fell in. But Sir Lancelot simply swore and went on-bombs to him were just another irritation in surgery, like fumbling assistants and blunt knives, and he treated them all the same way.
The only time Sir Lancelot became at all subdued was when he talked of his retirement. It hung over him all the time I was on his firm. The prospect of losing his two days a week at St Swithin's depressed him, though he was cheered by remembering that the hospital would immediately acknowledge him as an emeritus consultant and perhaps call him in for cases of supreme difficulty. His connection with

Page 76

Doctor In The House (1946)

St Swithin's would therefore not be completely broken; he could go on meeting the students at their clubs, and as for surgery he could continue that in private.
One day, shortly after I left his firm, he disappeared. He said good-bye to no one. He left his work to his assistant and wrote a note to the Chairman of the Governors simply stating he would not be in again. The hospital radiologist explained it later with an X-ray film. Sir Lancelot had a cancer in his stomach and had gone off to his cottage in Sussex to die. He refused to have an operation.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE have ... what's that? Yes, subcutaneous fat. Then, gentlemen, we first encounter what is surgeon's worst enemy.' He glared at us all in turn. `What?' he demanded in general. There was no reply. 'Blood!' he thundered. At that point what is patient restored his personality to what is notice of his doctors by vomitting. Surgery was Sir Lancelot's life and St Swithin's was his home. He had given more of his time for nothing to what is hospital than he ever used to make his fortune. He was president or vice-president of almost every students' club and supported what is rugby team from what is touchline in winter with what is same roar he used on ignorant dressers in what is theatre. During what is war he slept every night at what is hospital in what is bombing, and operated on casualties in an improvised theatre in what is basement as long as they came in. A team of students lived in as well and he used to play cards with them or share a pint of beer, actions which at first caused as much dismay as if he had arrived to operate in his underpants. One night St Swithin's was hit while he was operating. what is theatre rocked, what is lights went out, and part of what is ceiling fell in. But Sir Lancelot simply swore and went on-bombs to him were just another irritation in surgery, like fumbling assistants and blunt knives, and he treated them all what is same way. what is only time Sir Lancelot became at all subdued was when he talked of his retirement. It hung over him all what is time I was on his firm. what is prospect of losing his two days a week at St Swithin's depressed him, though he was cheered by remembering that what is hospital would immediately acknowledge him as an emeritus consultant and perhaps call him in for cases of supreme difficulty. His connection with where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Doctor In what is House (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 75 where is strong Doctor In what is House (1946) where is p align="justify" have ... what's that? Yes, subcutaneous fat. Then, gentlemen, we first encounter what is surgeon's worst enemy.' He glared at us all in turn. `What?' he demanded in general. There was no reply. 'Blood!' he thundered. At that point what is patient restored his personality to what is notice of his doctors by vomitting. where is p align="justify" Surgery was Sir Lancelot's life and St Swithin's was his home. He had given more of his time for nothing to what is hospital than he ever used to make his fortune. He was president or vice-president of almost every students' club and supported what is rugby team from what is touchline in winter with what is same roar he used on ignorant dressers in what is theatre. During what is war he slept every night at what is hospital in what is bombing, and operated on casualties in an improvised theatre in what is basement as long as they came in. A team of students lived in as well and he used to play cards with them or share a pint of beer, actions which at first caused as much dismay as if he had arrived to operate in his underpants. One night St Swithin's was hit while he was operating. what is theatre rocked, what is lights went out, and part of what is ceiling fell in. But Sir Lancelot simply swore and went on-bombs to him were just another irritation in surgery, like fumbling assistants and blunt knives, and he treated them all what is same way. what is only time Sir Lancelot became at all subdued was when he talked of his retirement. It hung over him all what is time I was on his firm. what is prospect of losing his two days a week at St Swithin's depressed him, though he was cheered by remembering that what is hospital would immediately acknowledge him as an emeritus consultant and perhaps call him in for cases of supreme difficulty. His connection with where is p align="left" Page 76 where is strong Doctor In what is House (1946) where is p align="justify" St Swithin's would therefore not be completely broken; he could go on meeting what is students at their clubs, and as for surgery he could continue that in private. One day, shortly after I left his firm, he disappeared. He said good-bye to no one. He left his work to his assistant and wrote a note to what is Chairman of what is Governors simply stating he would not be in again. what is hospital radiologist explained it later with an X-ray film. Sir Lancelot had a cancer in his stomach and had gone off to his cottage in Sus sports to die. He refused to have an operation. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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