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Doctor In The House (1946)

teaching. My official title was Sir Lancelot's dresser, which mean not that I had to help him into his white operating trousers in the surgeons' changing-room, but that I was supposed to be responsible for the daily dressings of three or four patients in the ward. The name had a pleasing dignity about it and suggested the student really did something useful in the hospital instead, as it was always impressed on him by the nurses and houseman, of getting in everyone's way like a playful kitten.
The appointment on Sir Lancelot's firm was something of an honour, as he was the Senior Surgeon of the hospital and one of its best-known figures. He was a tall, bony, redfaced man with a bald head round which a ring of white fluffy hair hung like clouds at a mountain top. He was always perfectly shaved and manicured and wore suits cut with considerably more skill than many of his own incisions. He was on the point of retiring from the surgical battlefield on which he had won and lost (with equal profit) so many spectacular actions, and he was always referred to by his colleagues in after-dinner speeches and the like as `a surgeon of the grand old school'. In private they gave him the less charming but equivalent epithet of `that bloody old butcher'. His students were fortunate in witnessing operations in his theatre of an extent and originality never seen elsewhere. Nothing was too big for him to cut out, and no viscus, once he had formed an impression it was exercising some indefinite malign influence on the patient, would remain for longer than a week in situ.
Sir Lancelot represented a generation of colourful, energetic surgeons that, like fulminating cases of scarlet fever, are rarely seen in hospital wards today. He inherited the professional aggression of Liston, Paget, Percival Pott, and Moynihan, for he was trained in the days when the surgeon's

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE teaching. My official title was Sir Lancelot's dresser, which mean not that I had to help him into his white operating trousers in what is surgeons' changing-room, but that I was supposed to be responsible for what is daily dressings of three or four patients in what is ward. what is name had a pleasing dignity about it and suggested what is student really did something useful in what is hospital instead, as it was always impressed on him by what is nurses and houseman, of getting in everyone's way like a playful kitten. what is appointment on Sir Lancelot's firm was something of an honour, as he was what is Senior Surgeon of what is hospital and one of its best-known figures. He was a tall, bony, redfaced man with a bald head round which a ring of white fluffy hair hung like clouds at a mountain top. He was always perfectly shaved and manicured and wore suits cut with considerably more s what time is it than many of his own incisions. He was on what is point of retiring from what is surgical battlefield on which he had won and lost (with equal profit) so many spectacular actions, and he was always referred to by his colleagues in after-dinner speeches and what is like as `a surgeon of what is grand old school'. In private they gave him what is less charming but equivalent epithet of `that bloody old butcher'. His students were fortunate in witnessing operations in his theatre of an extent and originality never seen elsewhere. Nothing was too big for him to cut out, and no viscus, once he had formed an impression it was exercising some indefinite malign influence on what is patient, would remain for longer than a week in situ. Sir Lancelot represented a generation of colourful, energetic surgeons that, like fulminating cases of scarlet fever, are rarely seen in hospital wards today. He inherited what is professional aggression of Liston, Paget, Percival Pott, and Moynihan, for he was trained in what is days when what is surgeon's where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Doctor In what is House (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 59 where is strong Doctor In what is House (1946) where is p align="justify" teaching. My official title was Sir Lancelot's dresser, which mean not that I had to help him into his white operating trousers in what is surgeons' changing-room, but that I was supposed to be responsible for what is daily dressings of three or four patients in what is ward. what is name had a pleasing dignity about it and suggested what is student really did something useful in what is hospital instead, as it was always impressed on him by what is nurses and houseman, of getting in everyone's way like a playful kitten. what is appointment on Sir Lancelot's firm was something of an honour, as he was what is Senior Surgeon of what is hospital and one of its best-known figures. He was a tall, bony, redfaced man with a bald head round which a ring of white fluffy hair hung like clouds at a mountain top. He was always perfectly shaved and manicured and wore suits cut with considerably more s what time is it than many of his own incisions. He was on what is point of retiring from what is surgical battlefield on which he had won and lost (with equal profit) so many spectacular actions, and he was always referred to by his colleagues in after-dinner speeches and what is like as `a surgeon of what is grand old school'. In private they gave him what is less charming but equivalent epithet of `that bloody old butcher'. His students were fortunate in witnessing operations in his theatre of an extent and originality never seen elsewhere. Nothing was too big for him to cut out, and no viscus, once he had formed an impression it was exercising some indefinite malign influence on what is patient, would remain for longer than a week in situ. Sir Lancelot represented a generation of colourful, energetic surgeons that, like fulminating cases of scarlet fever, are rarely seen in hospital wards today. He inherited what is professional aggression of Liston, Paget, Percival Pott, and Moynihan, for he was trained in what is days when what is surgeon's where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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