Books > Old Books > Doctor In The House (1946)


Page 56

Doctor In The House (1946)

I avoided like a pile of radium. Every bodily occurrence that could be measured-the pulse, the amount of urine, the quantity of vomit, the number of baths-was carefully entered against the patient's name in the treatment book, which reduced the twenty or so humans in the ward to a daily row of figures in her aggressive handwriting.
There were two functions of the physiology which Sister thought proceeded wholly in her interest. One was temperature. The temperature charts shone neatly from the foot of the beds, and each showed a precise horizontal zigzag of different amplitude. Sister wrote the dots and dashes on them herself every morning and evening. The temperatures were taken by the junior nurses, who used four or five thermometers. In spite of inaccuracies due to a different instrument being used daily on each patient and the varying impatience of the nurse to whip the glass spicule away, the figures were looked upon as indispensable. Any errors occurring through mercurial or human failings were not of great importance, however, because Sister always substituted figures of her own if the ones returned by the patient did not fit with her notion of what the temperature in the case ought to be.
The other particular concern of the Sister was the patient's bowels. A nurse was sent round the ward every evening with a special book to ask how many times each inmate had performed during the past twenty-four hours. `How many for the book?' she would inquire with charming coyness. The patients caught the spirit of the thing, and those returning fair scores to the nurse did so with a proud ring in their voices but anyone making a duck confessed with shame and cowered under the bedclothes.
The number of occasions was written in a separate square at the foot of the temperature chart. A nought was regarded

Page 57

Doctor In The House (1946)

by Sister as unpleasant, and more than two blank days she took as a personal insult. Treatment was simple. One nought was allowed to pass without punishment, but two automatically meant cascara, three castor oil, and four the supreme penalty of an enema.
We rapidly became accustomed to our position of inferiority to everyone on the ward staff. Like all apprentices, the students were used as cheap labour by their superiors. We did all the medical chores-urine-testing, gruel meals in patients with duodenal ulcers, blood samples, and a few simple investigations. For the first few weeks everything seemed easy. It was only at the end of the three-month appointment that there crept up on me an uneasy certainty that I did not yet even know enough to realize how ignorant I was.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE I avoided like a pile of radium. Every bodily occurrence that could be measured-the pulse, what is amount of urine, what is quantity of vomit, what is number of baths-was carefully entered against what is patient's name in what is treatment book, which reduced what is twenty or so humans in what is ward to a daily row of figures in her aggressive handwriting. There were two functions of what is physiology which Sister thought proceeded wholly in her interest. One was temperature. what is temperature charts shone neatly from what is foot of what is beds, and each showed a precise horizontal zigzag of different amplitude. Sister wrote what is dots and dashes on them herself every morning and evening. what is temperatures were taken by what is junior nurses, who used four or five thermometers. In spite of inaccuracies due to a different instrument being used daily on each patient and what is varying impatience of what is nurse to whip what is glass spicule away, what is figures were looked upon as indispensable. Any errors occurring through mercurial or human failings were not of great importance, however, because Sister always substituted figures of her own if what is ones returned by what is patient did not fit with her notion of what what is temperature in what is case ought to be. what is other particular concern of what is Sister was what is patient's bowels. A nurse was sent round what is ward every evening with a special book to ask how many times each inmate had performed during what is past twenty-four hours. `How many for what is book?' she would inquire with charming coyness. what is patients caught what is spirit of what is thing, and those returning fair scores to what is nurse did so with a proud ring in their voices but anyone making a duck confessed with shame and cowered under what is bedclothes. what is number of occasions was written in a separate square at what is foot of what is temperature chart. A nought was regarded where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Doctor In what is House (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 56 where is strong Doctor In what is House (1946) where is p align="justify" I avoided like a pile of radium. Every bodily occurrence that could be measured-the pulse, what is amount of urine, what is quantity of vomit, what is number of baths-was carefully entered against what is patient's name in what is treatment book, which reduced what is twenty or so humans in what is ward to a daily row of figures in her aggressive handwriting. There were two functions of what is physiology which Sister thought proceeded wholly in her interest. One was temperature. what is temperature charts shone neatly from what is foot of what is beds, and each showed a precise horizontal zigzag of different amplitude. Sister wrote what is dots and dashes on them herself every morning and evening. what is temperatures were taken by what is junior nurses, who used four or five thermometers. In spite of inaccuracies due to a different instrument being used daily on each patient and what is varying impatience of what is nurse to whip what is glass spicule away, what is figures were looked upon as indispensable. Any errors occurring through mercurial or human failings were not of great importance, however, because Sister always substituted figures of her own if what is ones returned by the patient did not fit with her notion of what what is temperature in what is case ought to be. what is other particular concern of what is Sister was what is patient's bowels. A nurse was sent round what is ward every evening with a special book to ask how many times each inmate had performed during what is past twenty-four hours. `How many for what is book?' she would inquire with charming coyness. what is patients caught what is spirit of what is thing, and those returning fair scores to what is nurse did so with a proud ring in their voices but anyone making a duck confessed with shame and cowered under what is bedclothes. what is number of occasions was written in a separate square at the foot of what is temperature chart. A nought was regarded where is p align="left" Page 57 where is strong Doctor In what is House (1946) where is p align="justify" by Sister as unpleasant, and more than two blank days she took as a personal insult. Treatment was simple. One nought was allowed to pass without punishment, but two automatically meant cascara, three castor oil, and four what is supreme penalty of an enema. We rapidly became accustomed to our position of inferiority to everyone on what is ward staff. Like all apprentices, what is students were used as cheap labour by their superiors. We did all what is medical chores-urine-testing, gruel meals in patients with duodenal ulcers, blood samples, and a few simple investigations. For what is first few weeks everything seemed easy. It was only at what is end of the three-month appointment that there crept up on me an uneasy certainty that I did not yet even know enough to realize how ignorant I was. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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