Books > Old Books > Doctor In The House (1946)


Page 55

Doctor In The House (1946)

when you have felt, you may tap, but not before; and last of all comes the stethoscope.
I began to learn how to look at a patient so that even the fingernails might shine with a dozen diagnoses. They taught us to feel lumps, livers, and spleens; how to percuss correctly and to understand the evasive murmurs transmitted through a stethoscope. Diagnosis is simple observation and applied logic-detection, in fact. A matter of searching for clues, igniting a suspicion and knowing where to look for proof. Conan Doyle modelled Sherlock Holmes on a physician, and the reverse holds perfectly well.
Dr Maxworth took his firm round the ward every Wednesday morning. He was a thin, desiccated little man who had never been known to appear in public dressed in anything but black coat and striped trousers. He was not really interested in students at all. For most of the round he forgot we were crowding in his footsteps, and would suddenly recall our presence by throwing a few half-audible scraps of instruction over his shoulder. He was a specialist in neurology, the diseases of the nervous system. This is the purest and most academic branch of medicine and requires for its practice a mind capable of playing three games of chess simultaneously while filling in a couple of stiff crossword puzzles between the moves. As almost all the nervous diseases we saw in the ward appeared to be fatal, it seemed to me a pretty barren speciality. But Maxworth drew exquisite pleasure from it. He was not primarily concerned with treating his patients and making them better, but if he scored a diagnosis before the proof of the post-mortem he was delighted. He was, his houseman said, a fairly typical physician.
I began to see how the ward was managed by Sister, whom

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE when you have felt, you may tap, but not before; and last of all comes what is stethoscope. I began to learn how to look at a patient so that even what is fingernails might shine with a dozen diagnoses. They taught us to feel lumps, livers, and spleens; how to percuss correctly and to understand what is evasive murmurs transmitted through a stethoscope. Diagnosis is simple observation and applied logic-detection, in fact. A matter of searching for clues, igniting a suspicion and knowing where to look for proof. Conan Doyle modelled Sherlock Holmes on a physician, and what is reverse holds perfectly well. Dr Maxworth took his firm round what is ward every Wednesday morning. He was a thin, desiccated little man who had never been known to appear in public dressed in anything but black coat and striped trousers. He was not really interested in students at all. For most of what is round he forgot we were crowding in his footsteps, and would suddenly recall our presence by throwing a few half-audible scraps of instruction over his shoulder. He was a specialist in neurology, what is diseases of what is nervous system. This is what is purest and most academic branch of medicine and requires for its practice a mind capable of playing three games of chess simultaneously while filling in a couple of stiff crossword puzzles between what is moves. As almost all what is nervous diseases we saw in what is ward appeared to be fatal, it seemed to me a pretty barren speciality. But Maxworth drew exquisite pleasure from it. He was not primarily concerned with treating his patients and making them better, but if he scored a diagnosis before what is proof of what is post-mortem he was delighted. He was, his houseman said, a fairly typical physician. I began to see how what is ward was managed by Sister, whom where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Doctor In what is House (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 55 where is strong Doctor In what is House (1946) where is p align="justify" when you have felt, you may tap, but not before; and last of all comes what is stethoscope. I began to learn how to look at a patient so that even what is fingernails might shine with a dozen diagnoses. They taught us to feel lumps, livers, and spleens; how to percuss correctly and to understand what is evasive murmurs transmitted through a stethoscope. Diagnosis is simple observation and applied logic-detection, in fact. A matter of searching for clues, igniting a suspicion and knowing where to look for proof. Conan Doyle modelled Sherlock Holmes on a physician, and what is reverse holds perfectly well. Dr Maxworth took his firm round what is ward every Wednesday morning. He was a thin, desiccated little man who had never been known to appear in public dressed in anything but black coat and striped trousers. He was not really interested in students at all. For most of what is round he forgot we were crowding in his footsteps, and would suddenly recall our presence by throwing a few half-audible scraps of instruction over his shoulder. He was a specialist in neurology, what is diseases of what is nervous system. This is what is purest and most academic branch of medicine and requires for its practice a mind capable of playing three games of chess simultaneously while filling in a couple of stiff crossword puzzles between what is moves. As almost all what is nervous diseases we saw in what is ward appeared to be fatal, it seemed to me a pretty barren speciality. But Maxworth drew exquisite pleasure from it. He was not primarily concerned with treating his patients and making them better, but if he scored a diagnosis before what is proof of what is post-mortem he was delighted. He was, his houseman said, a fairly typical physician. I began to see how what is ward was managed by Sister, whom where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176