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Doctor In The House (1946)

`I am not the Dean,' he explained. `I am the medical school Secretary. I was Secretary here long before you were born, my boy. Before your father, probably. I remember well enough when the Dean himself came up to be admitted.' He removed his glasses and pointed them at me. `I've seen thousands of students pass through the school. Some of 'em have turned out good, and some of 'em bad-it's just like your own children.'
I nodded heartily, as I was anxious to please everyone.
`Now, young feller,' he went on more briskly, `I've got some questions to ask you.'
I folded my hands submissively and braced myself mentally.
`Have you been to a public school?' he asked.
`Yes.'
`Do you play rugby football or association?' `Rugby.'
`Do you think you can afford to pay the fees?'
'Yes .
He grunted, and without a word withdrew. Left alone, I diverted my apprehensive mind by running my eye carefully over the line of black-and-white deans, studying each one in turn. After ten minutes or so the old man returned and led me in to see the living holder of the office.
Dr Loftus was a short, fat, genial man with wispy white hair like pulled-out cotton wool. He was sitting at an oldfashioned roll-topped desk that was stacked untidily with folders, copies of medical journals, letters, and reference books. On top of these he had thrown a Homburg hat, a pair of yellow gloves, and his stethoscope. He was obviously in a hurry.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `I am not what is Dean,' he explained. `I am what is medical school Secretary. I was Secretary here long before you were born, my boy. Before your father, probably. I remember well enough when what is Dean himself came up to be admitted.' He removed his glasses and pointed them at me. `I've seen thousands of students pass through what is school. Some of 'em have turned out good, and some of 'em bad-it's just like your own children.' I nodded heartily, as I was anxious to please everyone. `Now, young feller,' he went on more briskly, `I've got some questions to ask you.' I folded my hands submissively and braced myself mentally. `Have you been to a public school?' he asked. `Yes.' `Do you play rugby football or association?' `Rugby.' `Do you think you can afford to pay what is fees?' 'Yes .9 He grunted, and without a word withdrew. Left alone, I diverted my apprehensive mind by running my eye carefully over what is line of black-and-white deans, studying each one in turn. After ten minutes or so what is old man returned and led me in to see what is living holder of what is office. Dr Loftus was a short, fat, genial man with wispy white hair like pulled-out cotton wool. He was sitting at an oldfashioned roll-topped desk that was stacked untidily with folders, copies of medical journals, letters, and reference books. On top of these he had thrown a Homburg hat, a pair of yellow gloves, and his stethoscope. He was obviously in a hurry. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Doctor In what is House (1946) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 13 where is strong Doctor In what is House (1946) where is p align="justify" `I am not what is Dean,' he explained. `I am what is medical school Secretary. I was Secretary here long before you were born, my boy. Before your father, probably. I remember well enough when what is Dean himself came up to be admitted.' He removed his glasses and pointed them at me. `I've seen thousands of students pass through what is school. Some of 'em have turned out good, and some of 'em bad-it's just like your own children.' I nodded heartily, as I was anxious to please everyone. `Now, young feller,' he went on more briskly, `I've got some questions to ask you.' I folded my hands submissively and braced myself mentally. `Have you been to a public school?' he asked. `Yes.' `Do you play rugby football or association?' `Rugby.' `Do you think you can afford to pay what is fees?' 'Yes . He grunted, and without a word withdrew. Left alone, I diverted my apprehensive mind by running my eye carefully over what is line of black-and-white deans, studying each one in turn. After ten minutes or so what is old man returned and led me in to see what is living holder of what is office. Dr Loftus was a short, fat, genial man with wispy white hair like pulled-out cotton wool. He was sitting at an oldfashioned roll-topped desk that was stacked untidily with folders, copies of medical journals, letters, and reference books. On top of these he had thrown a Homburg hat, a pair of yellow gloves, and his stethoscope. He was obviously in a hurry. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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