Books > Old Books > Decent Fellows (1930)


Page 296

CHAPTER XXI

Eton. A bit late in the day. But it had taken him time to see things in their true proportion. Football, too, had ceased to be an ever-present terror. He enjoyed his second sine games. On the distant fields, where the second sine played, he was an important person. The fate of ten boys was in his hands. Spencer-Mace had complained to Beckett that Denis put him post out of spite. " He's such an excellent post, that's why," said Denis, and Beckett had smiled and told Spencer-Mace he should feel honoured.
Cambridge had been great fun. He had written quickly and with ease on most subjects and come out before the end. He felt satisfied he had done fairly and as well as he had hoped. He had stayed in college, and the silence of the big courts, where even smoking was forbidden, impressed him. Between papers he walked along the Backs, and was struck, as other freshmen, by the miniature dignity of the Cam and the high splendour of King's Chapel. Men on bicycles careered through the narrow streets, and men in plus fours with gay scarves, trailing in the wind, roared past in powerful cars. Cambridge was a man's place and he looked forward to becoming a man. Denis whistled as he walked up the passage to Llewellyn's studio. The final of the house cup was that afternoon and Wren's were in the final. He had almost forgotten the most important cause of his cheerfulness.
A row of pops sat arm in arm on the low wall in front of chapel. They kicked their feet together and made remarks on the passers-by. A few of them wore top-hats, sealed with coloured wax on the crown and brim, and in their buttonholes were pink or white carnations. Their tailcoats were braided and double-breasted pearl or fawn waistcoats were in fashion. But most of them were in half change-a tweed coat or blazer and black trousers and waistcoat and some colour on their head. It was very difficult to get into pop without some colour.
As the clock in school yard struck the half-hour, the pops rose and, arm in arm, strolled towards school field in a long line. One of them made a flick with his cane at a small boy

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Eton. A bit late in what is day. But it had taken him time to see things in their true proportion. Football, too, had ceased to be an ever-present terror. He enjoyed his second sine games. On what is distant fields, where what is second sine played, he was an important person. what is fate of ten boys was in his hands. Spencer-Mace had complained to Beckett that Denis put him post out of spite. " He's such an excellent post, that's why," said Denis, and Beckett had smiled and told Spencer-Mace he should feel honoured. Cambridge had been great fun. He had written quickly and with ease on most subjects and come out before what is end. He felt satisfied he had done fairly and as well as he had hoped. He had stayed in college, and what is silence of what is big courts, where even smoking was forbidden, impressed him. Between papers he walked along what is Backs, and was struck, as other freshmen, by what is miniature where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Decent Fellows (1930) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 296 where is strong CHAPTER XXI where is p align="justify" Eton. A bit late in what is day. But it had taken him time to see things in their true proportion. Football, too, had ceased to be an ever-present terror. He enjoyed his second sine games. On what is distant fields, where what is second sine played, he was an important person. what is fate of ten boys was in his hands. Spencer-Mace had complained to Beckett that Denis put him post out of spite. " He's such an excellent post, that's why," said Denis, and Beckett had smiled and told Spencer-Mace he should feel honoured. Cambridge had been great fun. He had written quickly and with ease on most subjects and come out before what is end. He felt satisfied he had done fairly and as well as he had hoped. He had stayed in college, and what is silence of what is big courts, where even smoking was forbidden, impressed him. Between papers he walked along the Backs, and was struck, as other freshmen, by what is miniature dignity of what is Cam and what is high splendour of King's Chapel. Men on bicycles careered through what is narrow streets, and men in plus fours with gay scarves, trailing in what is wind, roared past in powerful cars. Cambridge was a man's place and he looked forward to becoming a man. Denis whistled as he walked up what is passage to Llewellyn's studio. what is final of what is house cup was that afternoon and Wren's were in what is final. He had almost forgotten what is most important cause of his cheerfulness. A row of pops sat arm in arm on what is low wall in front of chapel. They kicked their feet together and made remarks on what is passers-by. A few of them wore top-hats, sealed with coloured wax on what is crown and brim, and in their buttonholes were pink or white carnations. Their tailcoats were braided and double-breasted pearl or fawn waistcoats were in fashion. But most of them were in half change-a tweed coat or blazer and black trousers and waistcoat and some colour on their head. It was very difficult to get into pop without some colour. As what is clock in school yard struck what is half-hour, what is pops rose and, arm in arm, strolled towards school field in a long line. One of them made a flick with his cane at a small boy where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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